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July 21, 1925 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1925-07-21

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THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SUMMER SESSION
Published every morning except Monday
during the University Summer Session by
the B'oard inl Control of StudentA Publica-
tions.
The Associated Press is exclusively en.
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatehes credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lisped herein.
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michizan,
postoffice as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $1.so; by mail,
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Communications, if signed as eviucnce of
good faith, will be published in The Summer
D eaily at the discretion of the Editor. Un-
signedl communications' will receive no con-
sideration. The signature may b omitted in
publication if desired by the writer. The
Sinumer Daily does not necessarily endorse
the sentiments expressed in the communica
tionms.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 492 5
MANAGING EDITOR
NORMAN R. THAL
News Editor...........Robert S. Mansfield
City Editor....... ...Manning Ilousewortih
Women's hditor...............Marion Mead
Night Editor............LeRoy L,. Osborn
igh dor.......... Calvin atteon
Night Editor.,.....,...,C handler 1H. Whi;Ppe
Assistants
W lliam T. Barbour George F .ehtinen
Viian rBoron Marion Meyer
Julia Ruth Browvn Ralph tB. _N(lson
Dorothy B urrns Miriam Sehitterbeek
Katherine Lardner N anceeko
Ina 1I en Lehtinen Wendall Vreeland
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
JOHN W. CONLIN
Circulation................Kermit K. Kline
Publication...............Frank Schoenfeld
Assistants

Myra C. Finsterwald Thos.

E. Sunderland

TUESDAY, JULY 21r 1925
Night Editor--C. H. WHIPPLE
-. WHY HELP THEM ALONG
The suggestion has been made, and
seconded by Acting President Lloyd,
that the universities of the country
reduce the value of the educational
credentials of the state of Tennessee,
-create more or less of a penalty for
the anti-evolution laws which that
state has chosen to adopt. This-has
been merely a suggestion, ahd un-
doubtedly will never ' become more
than that. There are a number of
reasons why it should not.
Whether or not the pple of the
state of Tennessee and the members
of the legislature of that state are
earnest in their opposition to evolu-
tion is a problem, but it is certain
that those people have found much in
evolution to be thankful for. The
world was reminded that Alabama
still retains her statehood at the great
Democratic farce of 1924 when the
phrase "Alabama-24 votes for Un-
derwood" remained set up in newspa-
pear leads throughout more than a
hundred ballots. Alabama's neighbor
to the north, Tennessee, finding her-
self comparatively unknown as a
state outside the geography books,
and almost completely ignored there,
was able, after a year, to "crash
through" with a much better, and
more intentional stunt. The only dif-
ference is that while Alabama's was
not nearly so good a stunt, the world
thought less of Alabama when it was
all over.
Tennessee, or at least a part of
Tennessee, consciously went after pub-
licity when the evolution law passed
and the case brought against John T.
Scopes. Tennessee is getting public-
ity, plenty of it, but it is to be doubted
whether this is the kind of publicity
that Tennessee wanted. Still, it is
publicity, and it seems as though
that state is ready and willing to do
anything to assert its statehood.
But to create any prejudice against
the credits granted by Tennessee
schools would inflict upon the people
attending schools in that state, peo-
ple who had no. part in the passage
or enforcement of the anti-evolution;
laws. The only justification for such
an action is to be found in the fact,
that it might be regarded as a sort of
penalty,-but people who are foolish
enough to create such a law are too
foolish to care about the recognition
of the universities of the land.
The only joys in being an editor are
tbose that come with knowing that
somebody agrees with you. We have
had a lucky week, - three letters
agree with us.e
A bum movie actor taps a cigarette f
on his wrist and thinks he is regis-
tering culture.
Education may be all right, but sail-
ing is sure a lot more fun.

EDITORIAL COMMENT
S THE RIIUHR ERA ENDS
(The New York Times)
Almost unheralded, the withdrawal
of the French and Belgian
troops from the Ruhr is now in pro-
gress. Essen and Bochum are to be
evacuated during the coming week.
Already numerous smaller places
have been vacated. The withdrawal
of the troops is to be completed dur-
ing the remainder of the month, and
thereafter until Aug. 16 only a small
body of French police will remain.
On that day the last man leaves.
Thu ends the episode of the Ruhr.
About the efficacy of the venture
there will long be differences of opin-
ion. The matter of most immediate
importance, however, is the effect that
this withdrawal will have upon Fran-
co-German relations. There could be
no better guarantee of France's wish
to co-operate than this. The old days
of harshness and force are over. At
the same time, those' Germans who
have continued to preach that France
could never be trusted because the
still sought secretly to place Germany
under her iron heel now find them-
selves deprived of their principal ar-
gument. To this extent, therefore,
the evacution of the Ruhr cannot but
have a salutary effect in Germany.
The latest dipatches confirm the re-
port that not only the Ruhr region,
so called, but also the towns of Dus-
seldorf, Duisburg and Ruhrort, on the
right bank of the Rhine, which had
been occupied in 1921 by way of
"sanctions" against Germany, are to
be evacuted. This means that the
entire eastern side of that river, bar-
ring the bridgeheads, will again be in
German hands. It also presages the
prompt evacuation of the Cologne
area and of that territory north and
west of Cologne which was to be evc-
uated five years after the coming in
force of the Versailles Treaty. In
other words, by autumn (barring
some unexpected act) Germany will
see a good part of the occupied ter-
ritory again under her own flag. This
is certain to relieve tension.
For the present all is well. France
is giving proof of her good-will. Ger--
many is complying with the terms of
the Dawes Commission. The exterm-
ists and croakers on both sides, of
course, say that this state of affairs
cannot long last. Voices are raised in
Germany crying that, although the
Dawes plan can be carried out for the
flrst year or so, it is destined to fail
because it is too hard on the Ger-
mans. In France the old bogy is rais-
ed of a Germany so prosperous and
recovering so quickly that she will
again crush Fance in a few years.
But in spite of these people to whom
General Dawes gave the unsavory
title of "carrion," there is a marked
relaxation of the Franco-German ten-
sion, which promises well for the
coming negotiations about security.
Certainly the contrast between the
international situation today and
three years ago is encouraging. In
place of suspicion and bitterness on
the part of the French and an appar-
ent determination to pay no more rep-
arations on the part of Germans, we
see the French anxious to co-oper-
ate and Germany loyally paying. In
place of chaos in international trade,
we see economic sanity reapparing.
They have been three hard years, but
the crisis seems at last to be passed.
WhAT DO YOU MEA,

"CIVIL LIBERTIES"?
(The Daily Illini)
Arthur Garfield Hays, sent to Day-
ton by the Civil -Liberties League, pro-
poses a law parallel to the anti-evo-
lution legislation:
"Be it enacted by the General As-
sembly of the. State of Tennessee
that it be illegal for. any teacher in
any of the universities, normals and
other public schools in the state,
which are supported in whole or in
'partsbythe publicaschool funds of
the state, to teach any theory which
denies the Bible story that the earth
in the center of the universe --and to
teach instead that the earth and
planets move around the sun."
"Section 2-Be it further enacted,
that any teacher found guilty of a vio-
lation of this act shall be guilty of a
felony and upon conviction shall be
put to death."
We wonder if the All-Campus dance
which the Women's League is going,
to give is supposed to be a recital for
the social dancing classes.
A newspaperman recently left a
million dollar estate. His other treas-
ures erelaid up in Heaven.
A popular movie'- couple have just

OASTED ROLLS
THLICK
THAL
THUBTHIDETH

II

catcher's Union. We've got to get him
another:job-this idleness is driving
him in the wrong direction.
Shakespeare last night! Some cul-
ture, eh boy?

Tamam.

He wants to resign his new post as-
office shiek, but we won't let him-
we can't let him-we'd be next in line,
and that simply could not be. We
held the job last summer, and it was
an awful strain. He must carry on
bravely.
Daily Dissertation
Today's Topic: The University Fac-
tory.
May we venture to -suggest some-
thing a bit futuristic, indicated by the
present trend of affairs? Taking your
permission for granted, let us look
ahead to the year 1950. The place is
Ann Arbor, the time.8 o'clock on a
sunny September morning-the open-
ing day of registration at the Univer-
sity of Michigan. The scene is the
-Registrar's office.
' The door swings wide, and from the
corridor beyond comes the sound of
many thousand feet shuffling. The
three hundred clerks sit up and as-
sume the proper mein of thorough
boredom. The mob splits into lines
and moves to the desks.- Le us lis-
ten in at one of these desks.
"Your hours will' be from midnight
to 8 o'clock," says the clerk. "Are
you a member of the students' Un-
ion? No, I don't mean the Michigan
Union, that was turned into a play-
ground for women students long
ago."
"Who is the forema of my depart-
ment?" asks the prospective student.J
"No personal conversation will be
tolerated here," says the clerk, hand-
ing him a folder labeled: "Rules and
Regulations and an Explanation of
Capital Punishment at Michigan."
"I'm sorry," she adds sotto voice, "Its
the rule, you know. Ever since the
factory system came into effect they
have forgotten that we're human."
The boy moves on, his eyes dimmed
with tears. He goes out onto the
walk which treads its-way among the
towering buildings. He looks up at
the rows of steel framed factory win-
dows, and at the neat rows of stu-
dents filing out of a narrow portal.
He moves to the one open space on
the campus-the crossing of the diag-
onal, and there finds a large group
looking intently at a scaffold erected
in the center of the space. A student,
blindfolded, his arms bound to -sides,
is led out, the noose adjusted, and
with a sickening jerk, the rope comes
taut.
"Why are they hanging him?" asks
the boy of a bystander.
"Don't you know?-Why he bolted
a class."
Another form was led out, and the
horrible process repeated.
"And that one?" asks the bay, anx-
iously.
"He smoked a cigarette, and also
got a paper in a day late. Either
count was enough. They're going to
hang him twice to satisfy the law."
The boy turns and leaves the cam-
pus. Downtown he sees a mob leav-
ing the court house.
"What has happened?" he asks
someone.
"Just tried Bill Jeff for murder,"
says the stranger. "Found him guil-
ty and he got ten days."
. - * * *
Peat Bog Says:
"It's too hot for inspiration these
days, but not for perspiration."
* * *
And now they've got Clarence Dar-
-frW up for contempt under a $5,000
bond, and he laughed right through
the whole proceedings. We bet he
snapped his red galluses with unholy
glee when they called him.
And while we're talking about the

notorious trial, we might as well say
that if Bill Bryan carries this matter
of the ethnological research fund to
Congress, he should have enough talk-
ing to satisfy him for some time. We
feel, too, that Bill shouldn't do that.
Doesn't he realize that if his plan goes
through he will throw many men out
of employment? And Bill's a great
benefactor of the human race, norm-
ally-just ask him-he'll tell you so.
The last we heard from Washing-
ton, his pa was -going to buy him, a
horse to ride. Wash says that he is
going tobuy him young and train him
into his own (Wash's) way of think-
ing. All of which reminds us of Un-
cle Olaf's advice on getting married.
He says:
"Get 'em young, treat 'em rough,
and train 'em." It seems to us that
we've heard that somewhere before.
Olaf says that it always works.
Battling Doug, now out of a job
since Thlick took over the Shiekhood
of the office, wants to know if Roscoe
Pound Is the President of the dog.

ARTISTIC
PRINTING
PROGRAMS
BOOK PLATES
FRATERNITY
PUBLICATIONS

10-

i

U

r

A BUSINESS education is the
safest thing in the world
for any woman to possess. It
may be helpful in a day when
conditions change for you finan-
cially.
Prepare here for Success
HAMILTON
BUSINESS COLLEGE

We Do Not
Serve
On Monday

Private
Partie
Ser

THE HAUNTED TAVE.RN'
417 East Huron St,
For Reservations Phone 7781

State & William'
Ann Arbor

11

NEW CASINO PAVILION

" i

I

1

1

I

Detroiter
Alto Sax
Silver-Gold Bell

r

m

Dancing Every Night
EXCEPT SUNDAY

the -Cr;
Over Ae06'8 Sport 5S
Dial 5182

NAT NATOLI'S

$98

ORCHESTRA ENTERTAINERS

F

Detroiter
Trumpet
Silver-Gold Bell

I

ONE OF THE BEST

This dance pavilion is one of the largest an finest in the State.

WALLED LAKE, MICHIGAN

$40

Forty-five Minutes Drive from Ann Arbor

Made by Conn for
School Orchestras

F,

Easy to Play
Easy to Pay
Come in and we will tell
you all about them.

The Trim Distinction of a Lad

1Il11

Conn Music Shop
14 Nickels Arcade

% 3
\{

Meaning Quality and Grace--
is Manifested in the
Stock We Carry

I
00A

THE ART OF DRESS AS WE
SEE IT
Combines several things that are all import-
ant which makes it an intricate study, but
we are never weary of looking into it from
every angle. Especially we dwell on the
viewpoint of the lady who wishes to mix
taste with economy. She is often the best
dressed of all, for she carefully selects her
apparel with an eye to style, quality and
harmoy.
BEAUTY OF LINE
HARMONY OF COLOR

Combined in Garments Well Fitted
and Appropriate

FOR EVERY OCCASION
Most women are especially par-
ticular about their evening frocks.
They want to have something quite
intriguing to slip on for those so-
cial hours because they wish to
leave an attractive impression with
their friends that will linger even
after the event itself is forgotten.
So we keep an alluring selection
to choose from for the more dres-
sy occasions. Fine and cobwebby
laces, sheer crepes, etc., are all in
this collection.

'

The Store Where Style is Paramou
MACK'S SECOND FLOOR

To die good these days, it is quitel
cessary to die particularly young.

celebrated their fifth wedding anni-I
versary. Good advertising.

/'

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