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July 17, 1924 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-07-17

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TWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

., . .__ .e..r..,.._ ___ . .. . . .... ._........

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE"
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGANK
SUMMER SESSIONt
Published every morning except Monday
during the summer session.
Member of the Associated Press. The As-1
sociated Press is exclusively entitled to the
ase for republication of all news dispatches+
credited to it or not otherwise credited in
this paper and the local news published here.
in.
Entered at the postoffice, Arn Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building.
Comnmunications, if signed as evidence of
Zood faith, will be published ini The Summer
Daily at, the discretion of the Editor. Un-
signed communications will receive no con-
sideration. The signature may be omitted in
publication if desired by the writer. The
Summer Daily does not necessarily endorse
the sentiments expressed in the comiunica-
tons.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephones 2414 and 176-M
MANAGING EDITOR
ROBERT G. RAMSAY
News Editor............ Robert S. Mansfield
Chairman of the Editorial Board......
.................Andrew E. Propper
CitylEditor................Verena Moran
Night Editor..........Frederick K. Sparrow
Telegraph Editor..........Leslie S. Bennetts
Womens' Editor .............wendolyn Dew
STAFF MEMBERS
Louise Barley M\arian X-olb
Rosalea Spaulding Wenley B. lKrouse r
Marion Walker J. Albert Laansina
Dwight Coursey \lariun Meyer
AMarthat Chase Mary Margaret liller
Wray A. Donaldson Matilda Rosenfeld
Geneva Ewing Dorothy Wall
.\aryland E. Ilartlo f
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 96o
BUSINESS MANAGER
CLAYTON C. PURDY
Advertising Manager.......1il M. Rockwell
Copywriting Manager.......Noble D. Travis
Circulation Manager.......Lauren C. Ifaight
Publication Manager........C. Wells Christie
Account Manager..............Byron P'arker
STAFF AlEMBERS
Florence I. Morse L lorence McComb
Charles L. Lewis Maryellen Brown t
THURSDAY, JULY 17, 1924
Night Editor-ROBT. S. MANSFIELD

an insurance company gave Edsel for international copyright and for1
Ford $89,000 because his wife's Jew- simplified selling, to stress in all sea-
els were stolen. A society woman as- sons the need and advantage of the
serts she spends thousands of dollars study of American literature, and to
annually to protect some jewels which point out, perhaps in too many sea-.
originally cost her $50,000. Another sons, that literature and plays are
society woman, a short while ago, not the same thing. Now that he is
informed the police she was not par- !retiring, though he leaves no single
ticuularly concerned about the loss professor quite equal to taking up his
of her pearl necklace since it was full task, he leaves many in many uni-
only a paste duplicate of the expen- versities who are engaged in it.
sive original which was stored in a His attitude toward the stage is
vault. typical of his whole career, and of its
Why do people in this stage of civ- influence. All the smart young play-
ilization wear jewels anyway? Is it wrights, said someone a decade ago,
for pleasure, for adornment, or mere- were "brandered by the same Mat-
ly to demonstrate the ability to pay' thews." From him they learned to
for them? If people find aesthetic distrust closet dramas, the bastards
pleasure in wearing jewels, how can in blank verse and unwieldy acts and
they reconcile themselves with cheap scenes which pretended to the throne
imitations? If jewels are worn for of literature in an unpropitious time;
adornment, are we in our aesthetic learned . to study the tricks and de-
sense really any more civilized than vices of the actual stage and to think
,savages who wear rings in their nos- in terms of audience and box office.
es? If one must wear jewels to dis- Professor Matthews, and his followers
play wealth, again where is our civ- after him, liked the "well-made play,"
ilization? Are we not a bit childish aid they, if not he, made it a fetish.
if we wear jewels to "show off" or to Such a program was tempting, partic-
make our poorer friends envious of ularly so long as there was no con-
our wealth? temporary dearth of plays which had
And why are such exhorbitant sums any real literary merit. It fortified
paid for the so-called "precious" the playwrights and critics in their
stones? A great many stones are as instinct to see a necessity as a vir-
beautiful as some of the precious tue. The plays of his earlier years as
ones. The only difference is that the a professor could not be read, but
latter can be procured more readily. some of them could be played; it
If the precious stones were not so seemed therefore the part of wisdom
rare, they would not be in such de- to examine them not as masterpieces
mand. On the other hand, if they but as theater-pieces. When later a
were less in demand, they would cost new age of drama dawned, the follow-
less. And if they cost less, people ers of Professor Matthews were some
would not be so keen to wear them. of them not ready for it. They kept
on talking about Pinero when there
PRIMITIVE PURITANISM was a Shaw to talk about.
It isn't far from Ann Arbor that To put it briefly, Professor Matthews
te i .y iu w t came upon the stage of American ed-
there is a city, so imbued with the ucation at a time when the drama to
spirit of the Spanish Inquisition and have depth was expected to have dul-
the Blue Laws of Zion City that only ness. He helped to banish dulness,
those people who are friends of the but he also helped to bring it to the
librarian can draw out "The Plastic surface, to make it alert. That is no
Age," and they have to carry it out longer all the drama needs. It must,
of the library in a paper sack! The as it lately shows a tendency to do
atmosphere of rarified intelligence find its depths again. His influence
which the University is supposed to will have been most useful if it proves
disseminate has not extended to to have made it more difficult for
Adrian where this primitive from of drama to be dull.
puritanism is rampant.
It makes ,no difference about the Mi a
merits or demerits of the book, ex- i ChIgan ongs
cept that people who object actively
to it place themselves in the same (Editor's Note-During the summer
category as the Women's clubs months the University is host to a
throughout the country who put them- great many strangers who know noth-
selves on record as opposed to the ing of the school other than what they
showing of such movies as "Flaming see and hear in the course of their vis-
Youth." Neither the "Flaming Youth" it. For this reason, songs of old Mich-
nor "The Plastic Age" are worthy of igan, Michigan traditions, and Univer
a person's valuable time, they are sity history will be featured in this
silly to be considered seriously, yet column from time to time).
people all over the country rise up .
on their hind feet and hee haw ob-
I jections to obscenities they fancy are THE YELLOW AND BLUE
found there. Sing to the colors that float in the
It is all a part of the same spirit light
that leads people to find fault with Hurrah for the Yellow and Blue!
1 the textbooks of scholars with whom Yellow the stars as they ride thro
they do not agree. At this time, the night,
New York City is planning to adopt And reel in a rollicking crew;
a system whereby an "expert" text- Yellow the fields where ripens the
book writer shall write the textbooks grains,
at the dictates of the teachers. This And yellow the moon on the harves
comes as a reaction against the con- wain;
elusions drawn by certain eminent Hail! Hail to the colors that float i
t historians which run counter to those the light,
whose votes control the school Hurrah! for the Yellow and Blue!
boards.
America is about to enter a period Blue are the billows that bow to th
comparable to the dark ages where sun
learning and progress must be tied When yellow-robed morning is due
down to suit the ignorant whims of Blue are the curtains that evening
the voters, the biased, prejudiced, de- has spun,
smands of our masters. The slumbers of Phoebus to woo;

I

May you feel its steady gleaming
Guiding you awake or dreaming.
Cherish tenderly its fire,
May it all to heights inspire;
Guard it for the Maize and Blue
This gift of love so true.
'TIS OF MICHIGAN WE SING
'Tis of Michigan we sing
With a merry, merry ring
As we gaily march along
We will sing a jolly song,
Of Ann Arbor and her chimes
And her merry, merry times,
Yes, a joyous song we'll raise
To Ann Arbor and her praise.
Clessifled Ads work wonders. Try.
Tie Summer Michigan Daily for re-
sults.-Adv.
1,-

WHO ARE YOUR
ASSOCIATES?
That is a question that means much
socially. It means a deal more in
business and finance. This bank
offErs you bank connections that
will be valuable to you in the busi-
ness world.
FARMERS &
MECHANICS BANK
101-105 S. Main St.
330 So. State St.
Member of the Federal Reserve

THURSDAY, JULY 24, 1924
Typewriters
For Rent or
Sale
Hamilton
Business College
State at William
Streets

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DRUGS

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Just the thing for summer use. Is not sticky and leaves the
hair soft and velvety.
Shaker top bottle $1.00
Calkins-Fletcher Drug Co.
THREE DEPENDABLE STORES
324 S. State, corner East and South University
Aves., corner South State and
Packard Streets.

FOR BETTER
SUMMER FOOD
TUTTLE'S
LUNCH ROOM
Phone 150
338 Maynard St. South of Maj

CANDY

SODA WATER

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WHEN DO VE OIE Z
In 1920 following a great war and
the rise of vital problems, and preced-
ing an era of foundation laying for
policies and progress, the American
electorate turned its back on the polls
and passed by on the other side. Eith-
er the nations voters did not know, or
they did not care, for the consequen-
ces, and a 46 per cent return on the
election was the first result. For that
bit of political somnambulism we or
they or someone else may be respon-
sible, but for it finally all of us must
pay.
If we had time for theories, we
might state a practical one, and in
this fourth year later at the brink of
another political abyss, define for our-
selves the basis of our government.
This is a representative democracy;
in it governmental actions are per-
formed and the business of keeping on
our feet in the world is accomplished
by men dependent on and responsi-
ble to American voters. The demands
of the people as expressed at the polls
are ultimately effective, or if the peo-
ple make no demands, they acquiesce
in the status quo. Silent disgust with
party policies is no weapon against
corruption. This nation is precisely
what the electorate makes or fails to
make it.
These figures, recently published in
Collier's, the national weekly, on the
extent of the stay-at-home vote, are
significant:
In 1896, 80 per cent of the voters
cast ballots.
In 1900, 73 per cent.
In 1908, 66 per cent.
In 1912, 62 per cent.
In 1920, 46 per cent.
With 54 per cent of the voters smug
ly quiet, primary conditions of demo
cracy are not realized and the govern
ment itself must be less than half ef
ficient. Half of our plans can fail o
hal o them never mature, and w
should not complain so long as we re
main half indifferent to our share it
the work of government.
Our political silence is antiquates
and unworthy of a free and sovereign
people. We must learn to spear
above a whisper where our interest
and welfare are concerned if our gov
ernment is to interpret anything tha
we say as mandatory. The action tha
we take this November will determine
the central figure of the ceremonie
next March 4; the forces and clarity
of that action will determine the effec
tiveness of our political life durinP
the next four years.

De ffor
ntew Cow
exceeds
presentl
supply
We are not surprised!-
-For years people have
been asking for just
such a typewriter-the
convenience-porta-
bility and durability of
Corona, plus the stand-
ard keyboard and capac-
ity of a standard office
typewriter.
You'll want at least one
of these new Coronas-
for your home-your
office-or both. Better
phone your reservation
now. You need not
accept the machine until
you have tried it.
0. D. MORRILL
17 NICKELS ARCADE
Read the Want Ads

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ej
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Silk Knit Vests

Today only--B2argain Day
$1.89.
Today offers an unusual opportunity to select
silk knit undervests in white, black, flesh, or-
chid and natural, with ribbon straps and adjust-
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(Mack's, second floor)

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EDITORIAL COMMENT
EXIT
(The Nation)
The !retirement of Brander Mat-
thews from the professorship of dra-
matic literature at Columbia Univer-
sity rings down the curtain on an in-
teresting drama in the history of Am-
erican education. llis appointment, a
generation ago, brought to Columbia
an impressive element of that quality
which was in time to make it the most
worldly of the universities. As an
undergraduate, he has told in his me-
moirs, he read the Greek and Latin
dramatists without once having it im-
pressed upon him that they ever wrote
for the stage. But he had gone into
the world and had come into close
touch with the theater and with jour-
nalism. IHe had polished his French
by conversations with Coquelin and
had begun the studies which mAe him
the first American expert in fne mod-
ern French stage; in England he had
been associated with a brilliant period
of the Saturday Review and had been
forced to define his own Americanism
by becoming aware of it against a
British background. Called to his pro-
fessorship, he glittered on his city
campus, a wit among the scholars,
though also a scholar himself. He
was enough of a pioneer to do battle

Blue are the blossoms to memory
dear,
And blue'-is the sapphire that gleams
like a tear;
Hail! - Hail to the ribbons that Na-

I-

ture has spun,
Hurrah! for the Yellow and Blue!
Here's to the College whose colors we
wear;
Here's to the hearts that are true!
Here's to the maid of the golden hair,
And eyes that are brimming with
blue!
Garlands of bluebells and maize in- {
tertwine;
And hearts that are true and voices
combine;
Hail! Hail to the College whose colors
we wear,
Hurrah! for the Yellow and Blue!
SENIOR SONG
Music-"Glow Worm"
Soft the shades are 'round us fall-
ing,
While the voice of night, is calling,
See our tiny lanterns swaying
In the preezes 'round them playing.
Now from out their centers glowing,
Golden beams of light are flowing,
Telling true, Oh. Maize and Blue,
The love we feel for you.
Now to you this-torch we're leaving,
But 'tis not with tears or grieving;

.

"What a difference
Just a few cents make!"

J E WI E.S-
Time was when savages bartered
valuable lands for glass beads; today,
civilized people pay enormous sums
for jewelry; and years from now, pro-
bably, our most valued jewels will be
in museums as relics of a barbaric
age.
Only recently a millionaire paid
$600,000 for a string of pearls, while

FATIM

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