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July 16, 1924 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-07-16

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THE WEATHER
FAIR AND WARNER
TODAY

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WPIRE
SERIC

VOL. XV. No. 22

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 1924

PRICE FIVE CENTS

ERICAN FLIERS
HEST IN PARIS
AMID FESTIITIES
PLACE WREATH UPON GRAVE OF
UNKNOWN SOLDIER; DINED
BY SECRETARY
PRESIDENT OF REPUBLIC
RECEIVES AVIATORS
Round of Activities Planned for En-
tertainment of Aviators: Lunch
With Pershing
Paris, July 1.-(By A.P.)- The
American round-the-world fliers' day
of rest in Paris today was the busi-
est day they have had since they took
off from American soil, they said this
evening after a round of activities al-
most as ardent as one of the more
difficult laps of their globe encircling
journey.
In the morning, they made a court-
esous call on the under-secretary of
aviation. Following which they laid
a wreath on the grave of the unknown
soldier. Luncheon with General Per-
shing could not be a long session, be-
cause they had to be received at the
City Hall and then call upon the Pres-
ident of the Republic. At their hotel,
they signed an indefinite number of
postcards and photographs and then
wound up their day of repose with
a magnificient dinner given in their
honor by Laurent Eynac, under-sec-
retary of aviation at the International
club.
"Apart from all that," said Com-
mander-Lieutenant Lowell A. Smith,
with a tired smile at the end of the
ordeal, "the day was comparatively
quiet." He added seriously, "We have
been greatly impressed in Paris not
only by the cordial welcome we re-
ceived which was far beyond anything
we had anticipated, but by the deep
and genuine interest shown in the
principle obpect of a world tour. Even
the President of the Republic who
gave us one of the most gracious
greetings any one could imagine
wanted to know all about the possible
results of our flight."
W B, FORD SPEAKS ON
TEACHING OF MTH
Prof. W. B. Ford, of the mathemat-
ies department, spoke on "The Cur-
rent Tendencies in the Teaching of
Mathematics," yesterday afternoon at
5 o'clock in Natural Science auditor-
ium.
Professor Ford divided his speech
into a discussion of Secondary Math-
ematics, and College Mathematics.
Under these two points he discussed
the questions: What if any, are the
ideals toward which we are striving?
And to what extent are such ideals
practicable? "The central purpose
in the teaching of Mathematics in
both secondary and college mathemat-
ics is to secure accuracy and precise-
nes of thought and expression," said
Professor Ford.
"The success of a teacher depends
upon two things. First, whether or
not he knows his subject thoroughly.
WAITING

Is the first thing most people like
to do last. It is decidedly un-
necessary when it comes to hay-
ing your wants satisfied. If you
don't believe it just
run up and
SEE
JIMMIE, JR.
THE AD TAKER
Press Bldg. , Maynard St.

American Globe Fliers Nearing Goal

E

4,00 ar$ 7
ti ts/T D "" .r,_, . 1. ' , u
'e. z 'r . .

I

fliers
They
gress

With the largest and most dan gerous part of their adventure behin d them,.the American round-the-world
are speedily winging their wa y from India to Central Europe, via a ncient Bagdad and Constantinople.
plan to hop off from Hull, England, across the Atlantic to Iceland on August 1. The map shows the pro-
of the flightrand the route whic h will be followed to its completion.

PLANS COMPLETE
FR HPEACEI PARLEY
Ambassador Kellogg Only Represent-
ative of U. S. in London
Conference
CONVENTION WILL DISCUSS '
DAWES REPARATION PLAN
London, July 15.-(By A.P.)-Pre-
parations virtually were completed,
today for the meeting here at the;
foreign office tomorrow morning of
the inter-allied conference, believed
by many to be one of the most im-
portant events in several years. The
purpose of the conference, in brief, is
the discussion of menthods of putting
the Dawes' report on reparations in-
to effect.
More than 150 delegates, experts'
and advisers will be present when
Premier MacDonald opens the con-
ference and hears the responses of'
the leading plenipotentiaries. Great
Britain, France, Italy, Belgium, and
Japan each will be represented at
the conference table by several de-
legates.
American Ambassador Kellogg will
be the only accredited representative1
of the United States, but Col. James
A. Logan, Jr., one of those most fam-
iliar with the complexities of the rep-9
arations problem, will sit beside him
as his official adviser. The only oth-
er American who is likely to be pres-
ent is Owen D. Young, a member of
the Dawes committee on the German
budget and currency problems and
known to the British as the man be-
hind the Dawes' report.
While Mr. Young's presence in Lon-
don is entirely unofficial, the Amer-
ican ambassador yesterday afternoon
held a lengthy conference with him
and Colonel Logan. On the eve of the
conference a decided atmosphere of
optimism prevails.
PROF._COLBY TO TALK
ON THEORY OF QUINTA
"The Theory of Quanta", will be the
topic of a lecture to be given by Prof.
W. F. Colby of the physics department
at 5 o'clock this afternoon in Natural
Science auditorium.
For information it may be stated
that the theory of quanta is a theory
of structure of matter, particularly as
developed by the recent work of Bohr.
The lecture will be of interest tit the
layman as well as to those connected
with the field of physics. The public
is invited.

Inventor, Winner
Of Pulitzer Prize,
Praises Colleges
Michael I. Pupin, whose story of his
life, "From Immigrant to Inventor",
has won the Pulitzer prize for bio-
graphy, believes that the spirit of dem-
ocracy is firmly grounded in American
colleges.,
At fifteen, Michael Pupin arived in
America alone and penniless. Eight
years later he became president of the
Senior class at Columbia University.
Today he is professor of electro-mech-
anics at Columbia and an inventor of
international fame.
Although American colleges havet
been accused of encouraging snobbery
and a spirit of aristocracy, Michael
Pupin writes that there are fewer
snobs in these institutions than in far+
less exalted places. The more pro-t
nounced spirit existing is one of un-
conscious reverence for the best Am-
erican traditions and a desire to "play
the game".
"I do not believe that either the
spirit of plutocracy or of socialism, or
any other un-American current of
thought could ever start from an Am-t
erican college like Columbia," said,
Mr. Pupin. And he adds that when
college boys have among them mem-
bers of the oldest and most aristocrat-
ic families in America and yet electI
the son of a Servian peasant for presi-1
dent of their class he thinks the spir-
it of democracy is very much alive
in them.
Fourth Concert
Offered Tonight
The fourth concert in the series of
recitals given during the summer will
take place at 8 o'clock tonight in Hill
auditorium when a miscellaneous pro-
gram of vocal and piano selections
will be, offered by James Hamilton,
tenor, and Nell B. Stockwell of the
piano faculty. Mr. Hamilton's accom-
paniments will be played by Mrs.
Maude Okkelberg, also a member of
the piano faculty.
The complete program follows:
Prelude, Op. 28, No. 17.....:.Chopin
Polonaise, Op. 26, No. 1........Chopin
Miss Stockwell
"Where'er You Walk from the op-
era "Samele" ............. Handel
"The Sorrows of Death" from the
"Hymn of Praise"....Mendelssohn
Mr. Hamilton
Consolation, No. 3 ..........Liszt
Moment Musical, Op. 94, No. 3
..........................Schubert
Elinoelles ...............Moszkowski
Miss Stockwell
"Vesti La Giubba" from "I Pag- ,
liacci"................Leoncavallo
"La Donna E Mobile" from "Rig-
oletto" ......................Verdi
Mr. Hamilton

PUT-IN BAY TRIP 1
SET FOR JULY 26
Party To Leave On Special Car At
7 O'Clock And Take Boat
To Location
SiPECIAL RATES OFERED BY
RAIL AND STEAMSHIP LINES
The Put-in-Bay excursion which has
been a regular feature of the sum-
mer session for more than 20 years,j
will be taken Saturday, July 26. The
trip is open to all members of the sum-
mer session and their friends.
The party will leave on special1
cars of the D. U. R. at 7 o'clock andt
take the steamer "Put-in-Bay" at 9
o'clock at Detroit. They will arrive
at Put-in-Bay, the scene of Perry's
victory, at noon. The geology 3s stu-
dents that are on the trip will study+
wave action, glacial groovings and
will go through several caves on this
location. The site is also remarkable
for its caverns, one of which is lin-
ed with crystals.
The steamer will leave Put-in-Bay at
4:15 o'clock and will reach Detroit at
8 o'clock. It has been arranged to
have special cars within a block of
the Detroit dock which will bring the
party to Ann Arbor so as to arrive here
at 10:30 o'clock.
Special rates have been offered by
the D. U. R. and the steamship com-
pany which will cut the entire ex-
pense of transportation to about $2,
for the round trip. This rate holds
good only if 100 or more register for
the excursion. Registration may be
made at the office of the summer ses-
sion or with Prof. William H. Hobbs,
of the Geology department.
PICTURES TO BE MADE
OF COACHING METHODS
Today will be picture day in the
school of physical education. Begin-
ning at ten o'clock pictures will be
taken of studients enrolled in the
coaching courses of the summer ses-
sion by the official photographer.
Plays and proper form in the var-
ious sports taught wil be illustrated
on Ferry field and photographed.
Opportunity will be given to students
to take their own pictures for the
purpose of. securing actual photo-
graphic illustrations of the methods
taught in the coaching school. It is
expected that these pictures will ma-
terially aid the coaches attending the
session in putting into practice the
ideas and methods they have learned,
and illustrating them for their teams.

Dodson, Editor
Of "Hygeia" Is
Lecturer Here
"The coming generation will have a
otally different attitude toward com-
nunity as well as personal health"
predicted Dean John M. Dodson of a
Chicago, in an address last night at
he natural science auditorium.,
Dean Dodson, who is the editor of
he magazine"Hygea" and secretary
f the American Medical Association,
iiscussed at length the recent rapid
progress of the medical profession in
the field of preventive medicine. In
twenty years he declared, the average
life span of the peope in the United
States has been increased from 40
to 58 years, nearly fifty per cent.
This has been due largely if not al-
most entirely to the activitiy of the
medical profession in the prevention t
of disease by vaccination and inocul-t
ation.c
At the present time the American
Medical Association is sponsoring ae
movement to educate the people in the
value of periodic health examinations.E
A large proportion of apparently heal-c
thy men and women, he declared, arec
greatly in need of competent medical
advice.c
"The American Medical Association,i
with 90,000 members throughout thei
country, is committed to carry on thisE
examination of lapparenty healthy
people at reasonable intervals", Dean
Dodson said. The care of infants ist
especially emphasized. The speaker
declared that health must be the fun-
damental tenet of education. In the
public schools regular health examin-i
ations are now the rule. Interest has,
been and is being aroused in the sub-
ject of health and disease preventionI
among the school children.
The speaker made a plea for the
broadening of the public mind in itsc
consideration of medicine. He citedt
the case of the recent small-pox epi-1
demic in Michigan as an example of
unnecessary affliction solely because
of popular prejudice against vaccin-I
ation. The elimination of such pre-
judices is the aim of the present worki
of the Association. -
Mr. Dodson is dean of the medical
courses in the University of Chicagoc
and Rush Medical College. He has
been professor of Pedriatics at thati
institution since 1901. He is carrying
out his present work by popular lec-
tures and by his magazine "Hygeia,"
sponsored by the medical association.
SPLAWNSTH PRESIDENT
OF TEXAS UNIVERSITY
Austin, Texas, July 15.-Dr. W. M.
W. Splawn, the new president of the
University of Texas, will be the ninth'
man to hold that position since the
University was formally opened in
1883. Former President Robert E.
Vinson, who resigned in 1923, held
the position for a longer period of
time than any other president, having
been in the office seven years at the
time of his resignation.
Until 1895 the University was with-
out a president, the chairman of the
faculty being the chief executive of-
ficer. Prof. J. W. Mallet was chair-
man for the opening year, 1883-1884;
then Prof. Leslie Waggener until the
summer of 1894; then Prof. Thomas S.
Miller for 1894-95. In 1895 the office
of president was created, and it has
been filled since by eight men, as fol-
lows:

Leslie Waggener, M.A. L.L.D., ad
interim, 1895-96; George Tayloe Win-
ston, M.A., L.L.D., 1896-99; William
Lambdin Prather, B.L., L.L.D., 1899-
1905; David Franklin Houston, M.A.,
L.L.D., 1905-1908; Sidney Edward
Mezes, Ph.D., L.L.D., 1908-14; William
James Battle, Ph.D., ad interim, 1914-
16; Robert Ernest Vinson, D.D., L.L.
D., 1916-1923; William Seneca Sutton,
M.A., L.L.D., ad interim, 1923-.

VALE CHEW WINS
ELIMINATION HEAT
WITHOUT EFFORT
OLYMPIC CROWDS GATHER AS
IT. S. SHOWS ROWING
* SUPREMACY
AMERICANS CONTINUE
TO SCORE VICTORIES
Wearers of Stars and Stripes Power-
ful in Swimming, Boxing,
and Tennis
Paris, July 15.-(By AP)-The Am-
ericans are strongly entrenched to-
night on the various fronts of the
Olympic batle front after notable vic-
tories today in four outstanding bran-
ches of competition. The famous
Yale Crew, the magnet for the great-
est crowd that has yet witnessed a
rowing competition, easily won in the
elimination heat for eight-oared shells
over the two thousand meter course
on the Seine River.
In the swimming contest, the Ameri-
can girls outdid the men and carried
the laurels with the Australian swim-
mers who lead the Americans at the
end of the day's three events, 24 points
to 23.
Sixteen American boxers in the op-
ening skirmish of the battle for ring
honors came off with a big share for
the first day while the American ten-
nis stars continued their victorious
march through the field. Miss Helen
Wills, American champion, won dec-
isively from Mrs. Satterthwaite, of
England; Vincent Richards was com-
pelled to go five sets to win.
Upon the completion of two days
of the Olympic swimming program
the United States stod second in the
list of twenty three nations entered.
Australia was first with 24 points,
while the United States was one point
behind.
America's unrivalled women swim-
mers piled up 19 points in the four
hundred meter women's free style
and were mainly responsible for their
country's showing, while the men
swimmers failed to win a single point
in the 1500 meter event, the plain high
divers placing fourth'and sixth to add
four points to the feminine score.
The United States placed two men
out of three in the semi-finals of the
200 meter finals of the breast stroke.
Robert P. Skelton and W. T. Kirsch-
daum, who finished- first and second
in their respective heats will have
an opportunity to defend the United
States in the semi-finals Wednesday.
Skelton turned in the best time for
the 200 meter breast stroke, 2:53 sec-
onds.
To the American women must go all
the glory for this, the second day in
the swimming contests. In the final
for the 400 meter race, it was just
a question of which of the three would
finish first. Miss Norelius, an out-
sider won, second place went to Miss
Wainwright, and Miss Ederle, the fav-
orite was placed first.
Johnny Weismuller, is now looked
upon as the last American hope to
defeat the-Australian marvel, Andrew
Charlton, and assist the American
women swimmers gathering points
for the United States
PRESTON'S CONDITION

UNDERGOES I PROI EMI NT
The condition of Robert Preston,
24E, who was seriously injured last
week when a train struck the auto-
mobile in which he was riding near
Toledo, is reported as being slightly
improved. He has regained consci-
ousness and this has been interpreted
as a very hopeful sign. He is being
cared for at a Toledo hospital.

Shakespeare Playhouse presents in University Hall, at popular prices:

Thursday Night, July 17th, 8:15 o'clock, Eugene O'Neill's
"Beyond the Horizon."
Friday Night, July 18th, 8:15 o'clock, Justine McCarthy's
"If I Were King."
Reserved seats, 75 cents. Reserved seats for four performances, $2.50. Advance

Saturday Afternoon, July 19th, 3:00 o'clock, Shakespeare's
"Hamlet."
Saturday Night, JulT 19th, 8:15 o'clock, Ibsen's
"A Doll's House.
seat sale at Wahr's State Street book store, beginning Monday morning, July 14th.

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