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July 15, 1924 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-07-15

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THE WEATHER
FAIR- AND WARNER
TODAY.

194~t

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XV. No. 21 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JULY 15, 1924 PRICE FIVE CENTS

PROF, CRISIE SiEL
TALK ON STORY 01
OXFORD DICTIONAR)
JOINT EDITOR OF FAMOUS VOL
UME TRACES GROWTH TO
PRESENT TIME
GIVES IDEA OF WORK
NEEDED FOR EDITIN
Wew Dictionary of Ten Volumes to b
Completed Soon Under Name
s.of "Oxford Edition"
"When the Oxford Dictionary is
completed, it will contain more than
400,000 words," said Prof. A. W
Craigie in his lecture on "The His-
tory of the Oxford Dictionary," in Na-
tural Science auditorium last night.
Professor draigie is joint editor of
this work.
"A full account of the history of the
dictionary would be an account of the
history of the English language it-
self," he said.
Traces Evolution of Dictionary
Before 1600 dictionaries were used
only to help people learn another
language. But the Elizabethan edi-
tors made it plain that Englishmen
Might be ignorant of many words
quite popularly used by authors. Ear-
ly in the 16th century small begin-
nings were made by Blunt and Phil-
lips. But the small volume produced,
small enough to be placed in a waist-
coat pocket was soon supplanted by a
large folio volume. The dictionary of
Samuel Johnson introduced an en-
tirely no wfeature. Illustrations of
the use of words were made from the
quotations of standard authors. These
quotations dated no further back than
Spencer and Shakespeare but Rich-
ardson who carried on this principle
went back as far as the 14th and 15th
centuries.
In 1857 the Philiological society of
London appointed a committee to dis-
cover all unregistered words. . From
this beginning the new English dic-
tionary directly sprang.
Coleridge and Furnival in their
work enlisted and organized the ser-
vices of a large body of voluntary
works. In 1861, 700 separate authors
were being dealt with. The personal-
ity of these early readers is shown
by one, Mrs. Moore, who wrote out
many thousands of quotations, taking
care to put her monogram and the
exactdate on the back of each one
recorded.r
Tells of Work of Dr. Murray
Professor Craigie said that in 1872
the dictionary still remained one of
the things the society was trying to
accomplish. In 1879 the work was in-
trusted to Dr. James Murray who ac-
complished remarkable feats of copy-
ing in a very few years. In 1882
the first installment of the dictionary
consisting of 352 pages was sent to
the Oxford Press. At one time so
many as four editors were toiling at
teh task but after 36 years on contin-
uous work Dr. Murray died leaving
behind a half-finished dictionary of
1,738 pages.

SUnderstudy For
The Big Bambino

Prof. Reed Discusses Political Commands Army
Chances Of Party Nominees Of Greek Republic
In discussing Mr. Davis and the Wisconsin, Minnesota and North Da- ARRIVES HERE TO
political situation at the present time, kota. And in California, though Cool-
Prof. Thomas Reed, of the Political idge will undoubtedly carry the state, t X
Science department, said, "The fact LaFollette will run the President a ..CO

..
Wallie Pipp, elongated first baseman
of the New Yori Yankees now must
be given the title of understudy for
Babe Ruth. When the Babe was ab-
sent, due to an injury recently, Pipp
felt that the fans should not be de-
prived of their home runs so prompt-
ly slammed out three in three games.
KRUSE RETURNS
FROM CAMP DAVis
Reports That Several New Buildings,
Including New Club Room,
have Been Added
DEAN ALSO PAYS VISIT TO
KENTUCKY BIOLOGICAL CAMP
Dean Edward H. Kraus returned
yesterday from a yisit to Camp Davis
in northern Michigan and the Biol-
ogical station in Kentucky. Dean
Krause pays the camps a visit every
two years, and reports that several
buildings have been erected in the
last year, including two mess halls,
a workshop, an old building changed
into a dark room for photographic
work, and a new club building. A
well house has also been erected over
the open well.
The new club building is call "Camp
Davis clubroom.' It is quite a large
place, containing a fireplace, numer-
ous tables for games, and a piano and
radio. The building is camp design-
ed, and is used a great deal during
recreation hours. Electric lights are;
used in camp. The class in surveyingl
has been given for the last 50 sum-]
mers, according to Prof. Clarence(
Johnson, of the engineering college.i
The Biological camp is more tempor-i
ary, because plans are being made to
move the camp across the bay to
Grapevine point, where the land isa
higher, the soil is finer, and the land
is less exposed by the elements. The
present site was choosen more or lesst
by chance 16 years ago, when Prof.
Jacob Reighard and George P. Burns
were investigating the gift of 3,200t
acres of land which the University
had been given. Other land has been
added since that time. There was a
pnmall clearing with two buildings
which loggers had left, and the camp
was situated here as an experiment.
Tents were used at first, but theyt
have been replaced by buildings, un-
til there is 40 or 50 of them. TheseE
are all built so they can be moved
across the lake when the change:
made. Oil lamps are still used in the1
station. There are several laborator-
ie, mess hall, and students houses.t
Study is made of things of interest1
"The camps are delightfully locat-t
ed," says Dean Krause, "and it is a
exceptional opportunity for the engi-
neers, and the biological students to 7
study under circumstances like these1
are."

that Mr. Davis is a New York lawyer
with a number of rich clients may be
against him as a nominee. But he is
a man of high reputation, ability and
integrity. He is acceptable to all
elements of the Democratic party ex-
pect perhaps in the middle west. It
was a distinctly clever and progres-
sive move on the part of the Demo-
crats when they chose Governor Bry-
an of Nebraska, as Mr. Davis' runn-
ing mate. Bryan will hold the middle
awestirn progressive Democrats to-
gether. This will serve to offset any
feeling that there might be against
Davis associated as he is with Wall
street." Mr. Reed said that he thought
Davis would be sure to carry the
south, and possibly Maryland and
Kentucky. He will probably also run
very well in New York unless there is
a split in the Democratic party in
that state. The fact that Governor
Smith has pledged his whole hearted
support to the nominee will be a great
factor in deciding the voting in the
Democratic ranks in New York. Ohio
is good fighting ground, said Profes-
sor Reed, for both Davis and Coolidge,
and likewise in Indiana and Illinois
the battle will be a strenuous one.
The unknown quantity is of course
the presence of LaFollette running on
a third ticket. He is sure to carry

close race. The Wisconsin senator
will also carry a considerable amount
of progressive Democratic votes in
the middle west, because of his prom-
ise to aid the farmer.
It is anybody's election, thought
Professor Reed, with the chances fav-
oring Coolidge. It depends to no
small degree on whether LaFollette
makes greater inroads into the Demo-
cratic or Republican party's votes.
And it also depends a great deal on
the strength which Davis can develop
in the North Atlantic states.
"Personally," said Mr. Reed, "Mr.
Davis is a fine man. He is a consci-
entious lawyer. When he is in the
employ of J. P. Morgan as an attorney,
he serves Morgan. And with each
client, his loyalty passes on to the new
case. It would be that way if elect-
ed President. His loyalty would pass
absolutely to the service of the United
States."
"However, the coming election pro-
mises to be as interesting a fight as
we have ever had, with the odds at'
the present time favoring President
Coolidge," said Professor Reed. "And
no matter who wins, the conservative
element of the country will be losing
nothing. The nation will be safe in
the hands of either Davis or Cool-
idge."

LF

General M. Othonajos
The new commander of the army of
the Greek republic, General M. Oth-
onajos, is known in Europe for his
diplomatic finesse and statesmanship
as well as his military knowledge.

I

STILES DISCUSSES
HEALTH PROBLEMS
Charles W. Stiles Of U. S. Public
Health Service Speaks On
Health and Race
ASSERTS THAT EACH RACE
HAS OWN PECULIAR DISEASES
Charles W. Stiles, professor in the'
U. S. Public Health Service spoke
Monday afternoon in Natural Science,
auditorium on the subject of "Pub-
lic Health Side of the Race Problem
in the United States."
"I am speaking," said Professor
Stiles, "from the sold blooded stand-
point of science in discussing this
problem of the South, and not from
the standpoint of race prejudice."
Manstudied from the zoologist's
standpoint is not ° studied as a race
but rather as certain species, said
Mr. Stiles.. Each species of man has
certain diseases peculiar to his spec-
ies. And when the negro was brought
to this country, he brought his dis-
ease with him and they flourish in the
Gulf Atlantic states. And these dis-
eases spread to the white element, and
we have in the South a much more
complex medical situation than you
do in the North. The North is largely
urban in settlement said Professor
Stiles, therefore she is richer, and
can cope with her sanitation problem
more fully than the South which is
in the main, rural.
The speaker said that in the North
you have only one race. In the South
we have two races. And each race
has its own diseases. The Black man
transmits his diseases to the Whites.
and the white man transmits his dis-
eaes to the blacks.
Mr. Stiles first took up the dis-
cussion of the Typhoid disease. As
the South is poorer we have more
typhoid there, said he. In the north
you can combat it because you have
more money to fight it with. The
greater the negro population in a sec-
tion in the South, the greatest is the
percentage of typhoid. This isn't the
negro's fault or the fault of the white
man, but is a condition which is in-
herent when you bring the two races
together.

U. So ELIMINATED
IN OLYMPIC S5M
American Swimmers Have No Chance
To Score in Free Style Swim-
ming Event Today
AUSTRALIAN AND SWEDISH
SWIMMERS OUTCLASS OTHERS
Paris, July 14.--(By A.P.)-Arne
Bert of Sweden, and A. Charleton of

i

AMERICAN FLIERS
ARRIVE IN PARIS
Better Schedule Time in Flight From
Vienna; Get to Paris at 4:46
Yesterday
HAVE MADE UP 11 DAYS
SINCE LEAVING TOKIO
BULLETIN
Paris, July 14.-The American
round-the-world fliers arrived
here at 4:46 o'clock this after-
noon.
Vienna, ( July 14.- The American

WILLIAM L. BRAGG OF MANCHES-
TER WILL GIVE LECTURES
ON X RAYS
WINNER OF NOBEL PRIZE
FOR PHYSICS IN 1915
To Attend Meeting Of Scientists In
Toronto And Addresses Franklin
Institute
Prof. William Lawrence Bragg,
dean of the college of Science in the
University of Manchester, and Lang-
worthy professor of physics in Vic-
toria University of Manchester since
1919 has arrived in Ann Arbor, and
will take up his work here as a spec-
ial member of the staff of the Sum-
mer Session. During his stay here in
Ann Arbor he will give a four weeks
course in the X ray and crystology.
Outstanding Figure in Science
Professor Bragg is one of the out-
standing figures in his field. To-
gether with Sir William Bragg, he
won the Nobel prize for physics in
1915 for their work done together in
X-rays and crystal structure, and the
year previous, he was awarded the
Barnard medal for his work in physi-
cal studies. He graduated from Adel-
aide University in Australia, and lat-
er a student in Trinity college at
Cambridge, he now holds the chair of
physics at the University of Manches-
ter. His work in the field of physics,
which has concerned itself chiefly
with X rays was recognized by el-
ection to the Royal Society of Scien-
tists.
To Offer Courses Here
The famous physicist will offer two
courses here this summer, already
announced in the catalogue beginning
this morning. The first will deal
with "X Ray Crystal Aalysis", the
second to take up the study of "Re-
cent Contributions to the Field of X
Rays and Their Interpretations", both
to be given in room 301 of the old
Physics building.
These are the only courses that
Professor Bragg will offer here. He
plans to leave Ann Arbor at the end
of the four weeks to attenid the meet-
ing of the British Association of Sci-
entists to be held in Toronto. He will
remain in this country until Septem-
her when he expects to address the
centennial of the Franklin Institute.
OBOSON TO ECTURE ON
HEA LT H EXAMINATIONS
Dean John M. Dodson of Chicago
University, will talk at 8 o'clock to-
night in Natural Science Auditorium
on the topic, "Health Examinations."
The lecture will be of a popular nat-
ure. Dr. Dodson will develop par-
ticularly the advantages and results
of a system of yearly medical examin-
ations for all, with the object of pre-
vnting disease and arresting danger-
ous conditionsin the early stages.
Dr. Dodson has been for the past
two years editor of "Hygeia", a public
health and hygiene magazine deal-
ing with these subjects from a popul-
ar point of view. As editor of this
journal Dr. Dodson has had a great
deal of experience in presenting heal-
th problems and information in a
manner interesting to the layman, and
he is greatly interested in securing
a wider interest in public health mat-
ters. His talk tonight will have this
end in view, while stressing the idea
of yearly examinations.
West Liberte Ia., July 14.-Orton
Ferguson, 38, of Atlanta, Mich, was
found dead with his head crushed in
a tourist camp last night.

Australia, on the showing they made round-the-world fliers, who reached
today in the semi-finals of the 1500 here at 3 p. m. yesterday, left at

meter Olympic swim, free style, ap-
peared to outclass the competition
from other countries as much as Nur-
mi and Ritola in the run.
The U. S. stands no chance to score
points in this event, all of its entrants
having been eliminated.
Tomorrow's race in the finals be-
tween the Swede and his rival should
prove to be a record breaker for both
of them. This afternoon they turn-
ed in marks below the old Olymp
record without being extended.
On the form displayed today, the
American swimmers however, likely
will finish one to three in the 400
meter final free style, while the Am-
erican women divers have a good
chance to score points in the plain
and high diving events.
The U. S. was eliminated by France
in the first round in the water polo
championship event.
Tuberculosis, said Professor Stiles,
is not a negro's disease, but a disease
which the white man has brought.
And when a negro contracts a white
man's disease it is much more severe
on him than on the white man. Mal-
aria is essentially a tropical disease
and the negro brought it with him.
Hookworm is a tropical and a rural
disease and it is much more severe
upon the white man than on the ne-
gr. There are three and one-half
million cases of hook worm in the
South.
Professor Stiles will speak again
this afternoon at four o'clock in the
Natural Science auditorium, illus-
trating his sneech with lantern slide

5 a. m. today for Strassburg, Al-
sace-Lorraine. They intend to con-
tinue from there today for Paris,
to attend the celebration of France's
national holiday.
The fliers arrived from Bucharest,
three days ahead of their revised
schedule. They started from Buchar-.
est early Sunday morning, had dinner
at Budapest at 11 o'clock, and took
off shortly afterward for Vienna.
The jump from Constantinople to
the Rumanian captial was made
without incident in the fast time of
four and a half hours. With the ex-
ception of Lieut. Lowell H. Smith, the
commander, who broke a rib at Cal-
cutta, but who refuses to admit there
is anything wrong with him, the avi-
ators were in perfect condition and
excellent spirits.
After the terrible weather encount-
ered in Alaska and the Aleutian Isl-
ands, followed by the blinding rain-
storms and the sweltering heat across
India and Asia Minor, the airmen
are offering thanks for having safe-
ly reached a cooler northern climate.
All of them are enthusiastic over the
remarkable progress now being made
in their journey, and so keyed up are
they that they are impatient even over
the necessary delays for eating, sleep-
ing, refueling and otherwise tending
their machines. They are looking for-
ward to being in London on Tuesday.
Since leaving Tokio, the fliers have
regained 11 days' time lost in Alaska,
in spite of the fact that they were de-
layed one day in Constantinople, so as
to permit the Turkish government to
make a required inspection of their
planes.

London, July 14.-Robert
garth, one of thespioneers of
trade unionism, is dead.

Apple-
British

WE REITERATE
That today is the last opportunity to
pay for your Daily at the $1.50 rate.
Tomorrow the $2 rate becomes effect-
ive.
Take a friendly tip from us and pay
that $1.50 today.
He who hesitates is the loser of 50c.
Yours,
JIMMIE, JR.
J THE AD TAKER
)Press Bldg. Maynard St.

^'----a "- + ...r.,.,.... re+v++ +wuwaaa aaauca. .

New i

I

planes.

PM

:_ . 9

...i

Shakespeare Playhouse presents in University Hall, at popular orices:

f1

Thursday Night, July 17th, 8:15 o'clock, Eugene O'Neill's
Beyond the Horizon."
Friday Night, July 18th, 8:15 o'clock, Justine McCarthy's
If I Were Kig."
Reserved seats, 75 cents. Reserved seats for four performances, $2.50. Advan

r r r .u.

Saturday Afternoon, July 19th, 3:00 o'clock, Shakespeare's
"Hamlet."
Saturday Night, July 19th, 8:15 o'clock, Ibsen's
"A Doll's House."
seat sale at Wahr's State Street book store, beginning Monday morning, July 14th.

ce

-- I ..-

I

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