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July 13, 1924 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-07-13

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M is

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THE WEATHER
UNSETTLED
TODAY

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XV. No. 20 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, JULY 13, 1924 PRICE FIVE CENTS

MOENTEE PLAYERS
PRESENT MODERN
SELECTIONS HERE
SHAKESPEARE PLAYHOUSE GIVES
FOUR PERFORMANCES ON
CAMPUS
ACTORS RETURN AFTER
FORMER ENGAGEMENTS
Modern Plays Among Group Offered
By Famous Dxamati Organ-
Izaton
Frank McEntee and his Shake-
speare Playhouse company will ap-
pear here on Thursday, Friday and
Saturday of this week in four perfor-
mances which will embrace plays of
the modern school as well as one
Shakespearean play.
The Playhouse company has appear-
ed here consecutively for several
summers, replacing the old Ben Greet
players who for years presented a
series of performances here every
summer.
The Shakespeare Playhouse com-
pany was founded several seasons ago
by Frank McEntee with the purpose
of keeping Shakespeare before the
public as a constant source of in-
spiration. Mr. McEntee himself di-
rected his players, taking little part
in the acting, and for the past year,
has been playing Hamlet in an ex-
tensive series of performances on
tour.
Eugene O'Neill's fascinating play,
"Behind the Horizon," will be given
in the opening performance on Thurs-
day night. Its theme is modern, de-
picting a young man struggling to
rise above the materialistic world in
which he is living. On Friday even-
ing, Justin McCarthy's "If I Were
King," will be presented, this being
the play presented by the Senior wo-
men in their annual play. Shake-
speare's "Hamlet," will be given Sat-
urday afternoon, and the engagement
will close Saturday night with a pre-
sentation of Ibsen's "A Doll's House."
Tickets which will be priced
at 75 cents for single admission and
$2.50 for the whole series, will go on
sale at Wahr's bookstore at noon,
Tuesday.
BRAG TO TALK TUESDAY
ON X-RAY APPLICATION
Prof. William L. Brag arrives in
Ann Arbor on July 15 to lecture on the
application of x-ray in studying cry-
stal structure. Professor Brag is
dean of the science school of the Uni-
veksity of Manhester, England.
Before his arrival in Ann Arbor,
Professor Brag and his father, who is
also a specialist in x-ray, plan to at-
tend the meeting of the British As-
sociation' of Scientists which meets
this year in Toronto.
Professor Brag was awarded the
Nobel scientific prize for work in x-
ray recently. He expects to remain
in this country until September when
he plans to give the address for the
centennial of Franklin Institute.
I INSIDE DOPE !! I
As a special favor, Jimmie
wishes to inform those custo-

mers of his who have not yet
paid their Daily subscriptions,
that they will save one-half of $1
if payment is made before Tues-
day. The $2 rate is effective
then.
And for classifieds
SEE
JIMMIE, JR.
THE Ad TAKER
Press Bldg. Maynard St.

Soviet Decorates
American Doctor.

Davis Most Logical Choice
For Democrats Says Shartel

Ohio Man Heads
U. S. Commerce Body

FINLAND WIlNS IN
10,000 METER RUN
WITH STRONG LEAD

"In discussing political affairs,"
Prof. Burke Shartel, of the La'w
school, said. "I believe that we of the
faculty are in somewhat the position
of a judge-we should take rather a
non-partisan position."
"But," Professor Shartell said, "Mr.
Davis seems to be the most logical
man that the Democrats could have
.chosen, after the fracas in Madison
Square Garden. The fact that Mr.
Davis has been an attorney for a num-
ber of big business men in the east,
I do not believe that should be held
against him as a candidate for the
Presidency. It rather indicates that
he is capable as an executive, or he
would not have been entrusted with
the legal business of men like Mor-
gan."
"Mr. Davis is a real gentleman,"
said Professor Shartel. "He is known
for his polish and smoothness. He is
essentially an aristocrat. And the
Democrats had to pick a western man
as an antidote for some of the poison
spread about Davis. They were
probably wise in their selection of
Charles W. Bryan as Mr. Davis run-
ning mate."
In speaking of the effect the La
Follette nomination will have upon
the two major parties, Professor Shar-
tell said, "It will be difficulty to tell
just how. much of an inroad LaFol-

lette is going to make in either party.
But Davis may lose a considerable
amount of Progressive Democratic
votes to LaFollette, especially in Cal-
ifornia and the middle west. How-
ever, Governor Bryan may be able to
hold the mid-western Progressive
Demrocats pretty solidly together."
Professor Wright, of the University
of California Law school, who is in-
structor in corporations and agencies
in the law department here this sum-
mer, speaks of Mr. Davis as a man
of great intelligence, well fitted for
executive work. "He is not a particu-
larly forceful public speaker, but is
a very gracious man to meet. He is
a tremendous thinker; a keen law-
yer. But perhaps the fact that his
law practice in New York has included
some of the financial magnates of the
nation, such as the House of Morgan,
may cost him many votes in Novem..
ber, especially among the western
people."
"California thinks a great deal of
Hiram Johnson," said Professor
Wright, "and Davis is not very strong
there. So it is difficult to tell where
many of the progressive votes will
go in that state. The Bryan-Davis
combination, though it is a queer one,
was a clever move on the part of the
Democrats to hold the Progressive
Democratic votes in the west togeth-
er."

PAAVO NURMI FINISHES
METERS AHEAD OF FAST
FIELD

500

I 11 \I1 / IW / W Iq/ " .

The Soviet Russian government has
decorated Dr. Russell T. Uhls, of Kan-
sas City, Mo., for his work in com-
bating trachoma in Armenia, where
he was a member of the Near East
Relief staff.
EDUCATORS OFFER
SUMMER COURSES
Visiting Professors and Instructors
Assist Education Faculty In
Session
TEN SPECIALISTS HERE
ON ADVANCED COURSES
Among the visiting professors who
are offering courses in the school of
education this summer are authorities
in every line of practice and instruct-
ion. The University has been able
to secure prominent men to deal with
practically all phases of work con-
cerning elementary and high schools.
At present ten specialists are here to
give extra and advanced courses.
Dr. George W. Willet, principal of
township high school at La Grange,
Ill., is offering work in secondary edu-
cation this summer. One of the men
formerly at Columbia who is here for
the summer is Dr. R. R. Raup. As a
graduate student,'he assisted in extra-
mural work in New York; during the
past year he has been at Ohio State.
Dr. Edwin E. Lewis is formerly of
the educational staff of the University
of Iowa. His activities there, togeth-
er with his record as superintendent
of schools at Flint, have made him
widely known as a school administrat-
or.
An outstanding authority on educa-
tional psychology is Dr. C. S. Yoakum
He has been professor of that sub-
ject at Carnegie Institute of Technol-
ogy, and will remain here this fall
to become professor of personnel
management in the school of business
administration.
T. J. Knapp of Highland Park is
prominent in state educational af-
fairs, having served as president of
the State Teacher's Association, and
member of the state pension board.
Miss Perna M. Stine, graduate of the
Illinois State Normal Schol and of
the University of Chicago, has done
teacher training and supervisory grade
work in Minnesota.
Mr. Frank Jensen, a former Michi-
gan and Illinois school superintend-
ent, is offering a course on problem
of the small school system. Mr. P. T.
Rankin is assistant director of re-
search in the Detroit public schols.
His summer course is on the use of
tests and measurements in elementary
and high schools.

Today In Ann Arbor Churches

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Mr. Sayles will speak at the morn-
ing service at 10:30 o'clock on the
topic, "Spiritual Reinforcements".
The Sunday School will co vene at 12
o'clock. The Student's lass will
meet in the Guild House (opposite the
church) immediately after morning
worship. Mr. Hal C. Coffman, secre-
tary of the Student's Christian associ-
ation will be in charge. The church
prayer meeting is held every Wednes-
day at 7:30 o'clock.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
At the First Presbyterian Church
at 10:30 o'clock this morning Dr.
Anderson will preach on "Play: Its
Profits and Peril". The Young Peo-
ples' social hour at 5:30 o'clock will
be followed by the Young Peoples'
devotional meeting at 6:30.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
The Bible School will meet at 9:30
o'clock. Communion will be offered
at 10:30 o'clock. The topic for the,
sermon is: "The God's That Fail Us."
At 6:30 o'clock the Young Peoples'
meeting will discuss the topic: "Ab-
olish War: Why? How?"
Theretwill be no evening service.
All meetings will be held in Lane hal
until the completion of the new
church.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
At 10:45 o'clock Knox Mitchell will
speak on "Business and Religion".
His sub-topic will be, "What are
Christian Ideals?" At 12 o'clock there
will be an open forum at which Prof.
Thomas H. Reed of the Political Sci-
ence Department will discuss "Politics
and Good Government." The student
social hour will be held in the churcfh
parlors at 6 o'clock followed at 8 o'-
clock by the motion picture service.
A play of real Irish atmosphere, laugh-
ter and stirring drama "My Wild Irish
Rose " will be presented.
ST. PAUL'S LUTHERAN CHURCH
The morning service will be held
at 9:30 o'clock, the subject of the
sermon being "The Parable of the
Mote and the Beam". The Bible
School will assemble at 10:30..
A student's hiking party will be held
at 3:00 o'clock.

of his series of sermons at 10 o'clock
today, his topic will be "Can Religious
Beliefs be Enforced By Legislation?"
On July 20 his subject will be "Funda-
mentalism", and on July 27, the series
Nwill close with a discussion of "Uni-
tarianism". A cordial welcome is ex-
tended to student's of the summer ses-
sion.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Holy communion will be offered at
8 o'clock.
At 11 o'clock the morning prayer
and sermon wil be in charge of the
rector.
CIW tl EMA
WERTH
Motion picture fans who enjoy ro-
mantic plots, thrilling action. dram-
atic acting, and a powerful story for
their screen fare, will like the William
Fox version of -"The Plunderer", op-
ening today at the Wuerth, and run-
ning through Wednesday. Frank
Mayo has the leading part as a gold
mine superintendent in love with "The
Lily", a woman who owns the dance
hall and gambling rooms of the pict-
uresque town.
A remarkable screen battle which
leaves nothing to the imagination is
shown when Mayo and Santschi, "the
plunderer," engage in a fist fight.
Another thriller comes when the res-
ervoir is wrecked, releasing tons pf
water upon the little town below.
"You Are Quilty", these words pro-
nounced by the court wrecked the life
of an innocent man, sent him from the
girl he loved, from the mother who
adored him, and made him a world
wanderer on life's highway. Such is
the highly dramatic plot of "You Are
Guilty" which opens Thursday at the
Wuerth. The play is enacted by an
all-star cast, headed by James Kirk-
wood. Others in the cast are Doris
Kenyon, Robert Edeson, Mary Carr,
and little Russell Griffin.
ORPIEUM
Laura LaPlante, Universal's newest
star, is featured in "Excitement", a
farce comedy which has its first local
showing at the Orpheum, starting to-
day. The story is a novel one, relat-
ing the adventures of a bride who has

I-..
Richard F. Grant, former head of
Cleveland Chamber of Commerce, is
the new president of U. S. Chamber
of Commerce, succeeding Julius Barn-
es of Duluth.
470 MAKE VISIT
Gronps , of 50 Insp eet University Build-
ing in Three Nights Provided
For By Rule
SMALLER TELESCOPE TRAINED
ON MOON DURING INSPECTION
More than 470 people visited the Un-
iversity Observatory on Wednesday,
Thursday, and Friday nights, last
week. The first trip started at 8:15
each night. Relays of approximately
50 people an hour were shown the
points of interest by Professor Hus-
sey and his assistants.
A telescope with a 37 5-8 inch lens,
is situated in the larger dome. The
dome revolves electrically until it is
stopped at the proper position, the
shutters are moved back and provid-
ing the temperature is right, the lens
case may be removed. This means
that the observer cannot start work
until 8 o'clock in winter and 9:30 to
10 o'clock in the summer. The lens
must be kept as a nearly constant
temperature to guard against expan-
sion. The telescope is made of an
ordinary open tube through which
light rays travel to a mirror. Rays
are reflected back to a secondary mir-
ror and then to a spectrograph.
In the smaller dome, a telescope
with a 12 inch lens is trained on the
moon every cloudless night. The meth-
od of procedure was that each visitor
was allowed about one minute to climb
up a ladder and take a look at the
moon.
a craze for undergoing sensational
experiences. Horseback rides, leaps
over cliffs, sensational airplane tricks
and hair-raising auto stunts cram the
picture, forming the background for
a hilarious series of adventures. Ed-
ward Hearne, Frances Raymond, Wil-
liam Welsh, Bert Roach ang Fay
Tincher support Miss LaP.imte in
"Excitement."
On Friday and Saturday the Orph-
eum will offer Harry Carey in his lat-
est western picture, "The Miracle
Baby."
MAJESTIC
Colleen Moore once again corrals
all honors as the perfect flapper of the
screen. This time, the dainty First
National star wins the jazz age sweep-
stakes in "The Perfect Flapper",
which opens at the Majestic today.
Those who saw Miss Moore in "Flam-'
(Continued on Page Three)

BRUNETO BREAKS HOP-
STEP-JUMP RECORD
U. S. Team Breaks, World's Record In
400 Meter Run Tryouts, Record
Falls Twice In Day
Olympic Stadium, Colombes France,
July 12.-Paavo Nurmi the marvelous
Finish runner, scored his third Oly-
mpic triumph today when he won the
10,000 meter cross country race by
more than 500 meters from his coun-
tryman Willie Ritola, with Earl John-
son, the American Nlegro,. running
star, surprising the field with a great
race which gave him third place.
Finland won the 10,000 meter cross
country event as a nation with 11
points. The United States was sec-
ond with 14 points. France was third
with 20 points. This result gave. Fin-
land 25 Olympic points and the United
States 10.
Bruneto, sterling Argentine track
performer sprang the first sensation
of the day by breaking the Olympic
record in the running hop, step and
jump with a mark of 15.42 meters,
superseding the record of 14.92 meters
made by T. Ahearn, of England In
1908.
The Olympic record held by Ahearn
which Brunetto k~roke today was 48
feet 11 1-4 inches.
The United States team broke the
world's record in the 400 meter relay
race sixth trial heat making the dis-
tance in 41 1-5 seconds, beating the
new record of 42 seconds flat made
earlier in the afternoon by the Brit-
ish team.
The Americans raced like the wind
to clip four fifths of a second off the
mark set by Great Britain in the first
heat and equalled in the third heat by
Holland. The United States team was
composed of Frank Hussey, Stuyves-
ant High of New York, the inter-schol-
astic sprint champion; Louis Clark of
Johns Hopkins; Loren Murchison,
newark A. C., and Alfred Leconey,
Meadow Brook club.
Members of the League of Wom-
en voters and any other women who
are interested in the Institute of Pol-
iitcs which will be held at the Uni-
versity July 21 to 26, are invited to a
meeting at 7:30 o'clock Tuesday, in
Lane hall. Plans for the institute
will be discussed at this meeting:
The President of the United States
pays an income tax.
TF

IN TODAY'S PAPER
On page two of this issue is the
first of a series of feature edit-
orials which will be written by
M. K. W. on a wide variety of
subjects. The editorial today,
which is written from an inter-
view with a professor, discusses
ITALY-IN RETROSPECT
Further features will be writ-
ten, the next planned will be on
SPAIN
and a third on
THE FRENCH PHILOSOPHERS
In these, The Daily is attempt-
ing to give its readers some-
thing more than the cut and
dried editorial, as The Daily
believes the editorial page to be
the strongest unit of any paper.
Other articles of interest in
this issue is thb interview with
with Professor Thomas Reed of
the Political Science department
on John W. Davis, and the pol-
itical prospects of th'e nation.

Haipong, province of Hanoi,
France's model colonial capital.

is

UNITARIAN CHURCH
Mr. Robbins will preach the

fourth

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Shakespeare Plavhouse Dresents in University Hallit *

-- - -- -. 6 v..%. r -v--------. N as 1

Thursday Night, July 17th, 8:15 o'clock, Eugene O'Neill's
Beyond the Horizon."
Friday Night, July 18th, 8:15 o'clock, Justine McCarthy's
If I Were King."

v aii. fV v .U.. , pl jll Q LPP LR Ls.L:.5 .
Saturday Afternoon, July 19th, 3:00 o'clock, Shakespeare's
"Hamlet."
Saturday Night, July 19th, 8:15 o'clock, Ibsen's
"A Doll's House."

Reserved seats, 75 cents.

Reserved seats for four performances, $2.50.

Advance seat sale at Wahr's State Street book store, beginning Monday morning. Julv 14th'

a -2 -a -.

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