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July 11, 1924 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1924-07-11

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PAGE TWO?

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, JULY 11, 1924

_
...............

,.. .__.

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SUJMMER SESSION
Published every morning except Monday
during the summer session.
Member of the Associated Press. The As-
sociated Press is exclusively entitled to the
%se for republication of all news dispatches
credited to it or not otherwise credited in
this paper and the local news publishedthere-
in.
Entered at the postoffice, Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $.50'.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building.
Cornmunications, if signed as evidence of
good faith, will be published in The Summer
Daily at the discretion of the Editor. Un-
signed communications will receive no con-
sideration. The signature may be omitted in
publication if desired by the writer. The
Summer Daily does not necessarily endorse
the sentiments expressed in the communica-
tions.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephones 2414 and 176-M
MANAGING EDITOR
ROBERT G. RAMSAY
News Editor............Robert S. Mansfield
Chairman of the Editorial Board.
.............Andrw E. Propper
City Editor.................Verena Moran
Night Editor..........Frederick K. Sparrow
Telegraph Editor...........Leslie G. Bennets
Womens' Editor............Gwendolyn Dew
STAFF MEMBERS
Louise Barley Marion Walker
Rosalea Spaulding Leonard A. Kelle
Virginia Bales Saul Hertz
Hans Wickland David Bramble
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 96o
BUSINESS MANAGER
CLAYTON C. PURDY
Advertising Manager.......Hiel M. Rockwell
Copywriting Manager.....Noble D. Travis
Circulation Manager. Lauren C. Haight
Publication Manager........C. Wells Christie
Account Manager..............Byron Parker
FRIDAY, JULY 11, 1924
Night Editor-ROBT. G. RAMSAY
The only real tragedy in life
is the being used by personally-
minded men for purposes which
you know to be base. All the
rest is at worst mere misfor-
tune or mortality; this alone is
misery,. slavery, hell on earth.
This is the true joy in life, I
the being used for a purpose
recognized by yourself as a
mighty one; the being thor-}
oughly worn out before you are1
thrown on the scrap-heap; the
being a force of Nature instead
of a feverish, selfish little clod
of ailments and grievances, com-
plaining that the world will not1
devote itself to making you hap- I
py.I
--BERNARD SHAW.
A VOLTAIRE TO THE RESCUE!
VOLTAIRE braved imprisonment,
death when he put hi thoughts into
print. There was little tolerance in
France in his time for a preacher o
tolerance. How very up to date and
applicable the following paragraph
sounds:
"What a sight it would be to
have all Europe in hoods and
masks, with two little round holes
in front of the eyes! Do they ser
iously think that God prefers thi
custome to that of ordinary folk
Further, this garment is the uni-
form of controversialists, warning
their opponents to get to arms. I
may excite a kind of civil war o
minds, and would perhaps end i
fatal excesses, unless the King an
Ministers were as wise as the fan
atics were demented."
So wrote that fearless champion

VOLTAIRE, two centuries ago, when
men and women and children were
burned to rid them of evil spirits
And what he though and said of Cath
olic bigotry in France during his time
he would just as surely have though
and said of Protestant bigotry in Am
erica today. He would have charac
terized the Ku Klux Klan in a man
ner just and deserved, as a secret
insidious, hateful, un-democratic, ani
un-American organization. For i
Protestant America less bigoted an
more sane and enlightened than wa
Catholic France 150 years ago?
Where will Americans find a leade
who will teach us tolerance as yot
did your own Frenchmen, VOL
TAIRE?
MAKING IT INTERESTING
The work done at Cleveland during
the last week may have far greater
significance than many are willing tc
attribute to it. The Conference fo
Progressive Political Action has nom
inated Iobert M. LaFollette as it:
candidate for President and has ad
opted his platform-a pltform which
is sure to appeal to a goodly share o
the electorate. In addition to this the
Socialist party has decided to endorse
both the candidacy and platform o
LaFollette instead of placing a can
didate of its own in the field.

The Socialist party does not intend
to give up its party organization. It
Intends to collaborate with the Inde-
pendents who are supporting LaFol-
lette. It has good reasons for doing
this for the combined vote of the two
factions should make an impressive
figure. At its height the Socialist
party has polled almost a million
votes in a Presidential election. It
is a big opportunity and the party
has decided not to let it pass.
The real strength of the new ele-
ment, aside from the obvious rein-
forcements gained from the Socialists,
lies in the platform which was adopt-
ed. It appeals to all those who are
dissatisfied with the policies of the
two major parties-to all those who
have a grievance. Of course, it is not
radical enough for some but they will
support it as far as it goes rather
than support either of the conserva-
tive parties. It also appeals to a great
many voters who are now enrolled
under the standards of the major par-
ties but who belong to the left wings
of these parties. They are the ones
who call themselves Progressives.
Robert M. LaFollette is a striking
character. He has long been the lead-
er of the progressive element in the
Senate. His views are very well
known to those who follow politics at
all closely. He will be sure to garner
quite a number of votes on his per-
sonality alone. A man of his type
is the logical sort of leader for 'a
party made up of discontented fac-
tions His ability, fearlessness, and
integrity are known to many and are
feared by his opponents.
The point to be made is not that the
third party, if it can be called a par-
ty, will elect its candidate. That can
hardly be expected. But it may af-
fect the outcome of the election.
Third parties have done this a num-
ber of times before. Roosevelt's
Progressive party drew away enough
votes from the Republican party in
1912 to give Wilson the Presidency.
That is the most recent example.
The Prohibition party in 1884 drew
away enough votes from the Repub-
licans to allow the Democrats to car-
ry New York and thus win the elec-
tion. Other examples might be given
The coming fall election may not be
the cut-and-dried formality which
many seem to expect it will be.
CAMPUS FABLES
I. The Story of the High-Brow.
There was a certain young studen
who was a high-brow. He had a
good vocabulary and a great reputa
tion among his fraternity brothers a
a deep boy. His pet abomination wa
something he called "sob-stuff" an
he defined this as an unnecessary ap
peal to the emotions by means o
tricks old enough to be retired. H
abhorred the movies, adored book
and art, and claimed that college wa
too easy. He! maintained that al
f his professors were ignorami, the psy
chologist had never heard of Janet o
Freud, the philosophers were unac
quainted with Kant, Spinoza, an
George Sylvester Morris. Much read
ing had made him cynical and he se
out to show the profs that the text
- book balderbash which they serve
s up for his education gave him a pain
? Accordingly he lit into the prof
- tooth and nail and gave them a fe
pointers about how to conduct
t course. He even wrote a !stter t
f the college daily bawling them ou
n because they had so far forgotte
d style and classical usage as to spel]
- today without the hypen. He blushe
with shame at the absurd demonstra
tions which the boys put on durinn

n football season, but he managed t
e swallow his anger and told the mot
s to remember their manners in thi
- future. During the whole year h+
, refused to attend his courses becaus,
t they taught him nothing new an
- instead stayed home and read up of
- the deep stuff.
- In June he received a note in whic
the fourth aid fifth letters of the al
d phabet were most conspicuois. 11
s left school and became a lecturer o-
A Free Thought.
is
The most satisfactory convention C
r the year was the Progressive conven
u tion recently held in Cleveland. Rol
- ert La Follette accepted his nomina
tion for the Presidency before it wa
offered him.
g The ways of diplomacy are dar;
r and mysterous. The inter-Allied con
o ference has completely befuddled in
r ternational journalists.
-
s There's many a delegate who wi]
- return from the party with a head
h ache, a brown taste, and an empt;
f pocket.
le
e According to insurance experts, a
f ages under 30 years the lowest mor
- tality rates among the insured per
sons 10 pounds above the average.

I

I

Y

persons masquerading as white and
slipping into the country. It is
probable that the immigration officials
are wishing that the white Indians
had obeyed the injunction of the poet
and remained:
Silent, upon the peak in Darien.
Patronized Daily Advertisers.

CAMPUS TREES REMOVED
TO GIVE GRASS CHANCE
Workmen are engaged in removing
a number of large trees from the cam-
pus. This is being done because

the trees are too close together mak-
ing so much shade that it has been im-
possible to grow grass in a number of
places. Two trees in the middle of
the parking space along University
Hall will also be removed.
Subscribe for The Summer Mich-
igan Daily.-Adv.

vVWVWvr/-
LINES FROM A FOREIGN CORRES-
PONDENT
The Olympic Games in France have
attracted travellers from all parts of
the country to the stadium at Colom-
bes. Here men of ekperience, b si-
ness-men, statesnjen ;gloe-trotters,
and journalists are gathered to behold
the youth of all nations perform,
among them the youth of America. It
is interesting to note the conclusions
that are drawn from seeing the Am-
erican athletes in competition. "A
single afternoon spent in the amphi-
theater at Colombes," writes a for-
eign correspondent of an Asiatic
journal, "is enough to furnish the in-
telligent observer with a complete
picture of the habits and psychology
of the American people, without ne-
cessitating a tedious and expensive
trip across the Atlantic." He then
goes on to dilineate the American
character as revealed in the Games.
"As I watched those clean-cut Am-
erican youths acknowledging victory
or defeat with the same modest smile,"
he writes, "I knew that they came
from a quiet, sportsmanlike people."
"When I saw the silent and magnif-
Icent effort of their runners and their
jumpers, I knew that they came from
a people that loved action and ab-
horred palaver.'
"When I saw the young Americans
soar like birds over the bars and the
hurdles, I said to myself that this is
the way every American surmounts
the obstacles in his path."
"When I saw on the list of con-
tenders names like Scholz and Le
Gendre, I understood that I was deal-
ing with people utterly ignorant of
the debasing sentiment of racialism
and sectionalism."
"When I saw the swiftness and
certainty with which the young Am-
ericans met every emergency as it
arose, I said to myself that this is
a people of magnificent individual in-
itiative, a people who would take or-
t ders from no one."
"When I saw the splendid devo-
- tion of each athlete to the single
s cause of his country's victory, knew
s that this was a people which sacri-
d ficed self to the common good."
At the time those notes were taken
e the National Democratic convention
s had just cast its 100th ballot without
s coming to an agreement; reports of
l further Ku Klux Klan outrages were
occupying the pages of the daily
r press; another political scandal had
been uncovered; and other American
d traits of character had been revealed
in the usual manner.
t We hope this gentleman postpones
his visit to this country for some time
, to come. May he enjpy his illusions.

-r a~S.-

I
.., - .

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11

1

EDITORIAL COMMENT!
PAINLESS RED TAPE
(The Baltimore Evening Sun)
The red tape of the Immigration
Department met an acid test yester-
day and as usual was not found want-
ing. The arrival of three white In-
dians in New York was without pre-
cedent. If they were Nordic blonds,
they should have been welcome. If
they were Indians, it might have been
possible for the officials to recognize
the claims of one school of anthropol-
ogists and to exclude them as unde-
sirable Asiatics. It was obviously
impossible to keep them out on the
ground that the quota had been filled
up, there being no quota for white?
Indians.
Thus the immigration officials were
caught between two stools. They are
to be congratulated on finding suffici-
ent red tape to hold up the new ar-
rival for a day and thus protect for
a time the American strain from any
infusion of blood which might appear
to be white but which in reality is
red. If the Indians get in at all, the
$500 bond and other strings attached
to them should serve as a safeguard
against that pollution of the native
stock upon which the prized institu-
tions of the republic depend. It is a'
source of gratification that the offic-
ials for once accomplished their pur-
pose without the apparent infliction of!
mental or physical suffering. No hus--
band was separated from his wife
or a child from its mother.
Now that a precedent has been sett
there should be no further danger of
the nation of Asiatics and such like

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