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July 11, 1924 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-07-11

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OF

THE WEATHER
FAIR AND WARNER
TODAY

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XV. No. 18

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JULY 11, 1924

PRICE FIVE CENTS

DEORTS SELEP
FOR HRNNIN MA
NEBRAS iAN COVERNOR, BROTH
ER OF THiE GREAT COMMONER,
i AVIS' CHOICE
NOMINAIIQN ACHIEVED
WITH SINGLE BALLO'
Nominees, and William Jennings Bry.
an Dne Together; Lincoln Plans
Homecoming
New York, July 1.-(By AP)-
John W. Davis of West Virginia and
Gov. Charles W. Bryan of Nebraska
are the Democratic party's candidates
for president and vice president.
Emerging on the 103rd ballot as
the Democratic national convention's
choice for the presidential nominat-
ion, the West Virginia lawyer and
diplomat swept away great waves of
bitterness churned up during the 15
preceding days of stormy conflict.
Then taking command immediately,
the new head of the party guided the
convention swiftly toward the select-
Ion of his running mate, the brother
of William Jennings Bryan, his, most
vigorous opponent throughout the
balloting.
Adjourns at 2:30 A. i.
When the convention adjourned at
2:24 a. in. today, it had filled many
new pages of political history, rising
in draratic force from the violent
struggle 12 days ago over naming the
Ku Klux Klan in the party platform
through the record-breaking dead-
lock between supporters of William G.
McAdoo and Gov. Alfred E. Smith
which held throughf100rballots before
a presidential nomination was in sight
and in the closing scenes came a new
precedent in the personal appearance
of the nominee to acknowledge his
gratitude and his prompt assumption
of command.
The final adjournment, which mark-
ed the formal ending of the convention
came two minutes after Gov. Bryan
had been declared nominated for the
vice presidency. Tt was accomplish-
ed with a single ballot, through the
changing of many votes which elim-
inated most of the 30 names that first
appeared, but it was not unanimous.
The weary delegates had finished
their work.
New York, July 10.-(By A.P.)-
After a hectic day, during which he
surrendered good naturedly to a
throng of admirers and photographers
who besieged him repeatedly at the
Waldorf Astorial hotel, John W. Dav-
is, Democratic nominee for President,
tonight escaped from an inundation of
congratulatory telegrams, dined with
Charles W. Bryan, his running mate,
and William Jennings Bryan, and pre-
pared to go to his country home at
Locust Valley, Long Island, for a
brief rest before taking up detailed
plans for his campaign.
William J. Bryan, who had opposed
Mr. Davis' nomination met the nomi-
nee in a corridor of the hotel immed-
iately after Mr. Davis' meeting with
newspaper men this morning. Mr.
Bryan held out his hand, smiled
and said. "I am at your command."
Lincoln, Neb., July 10.-(By A.P.)
-All civic and patriotic organizations
discussed plans today for a homecom-
h ng celebration for Charles W. Bryan,

Democratic Vice-Presdential nominee,
who is expected to arrive Sunday.
Mayor Gehrunghas expressed will-
ingness to issue a proclamation°ask-
ing that the business district at home
be decorated with the national colors.
The Chamber of Commerce told the
governor in a telegram sent to New
York City today, that he will be "roy-
ally welcomed."
THOSE THINGS
one wants, and yet cannot get,
sure do make life miserable.
Let the Daily Classifieds bright-
en up your life.
Do amble up and
SEE
JIMMIE, JR.
THE AD TAKER
Preso Bldg. Maynard St.

'CHOSEN FOR SECOND PLACE
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The brother f William Jening"}Bryanthe.Great.Comoner,:is th
Jh W. Dvis, h oieefrtefis!oiin.Drn hebloig
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Charles W. Bryant
The brother of William Jennings Bryan, the Great Commoner, is the
Democratic nominee for the vice-pres idency. He was virtually chosen by
John W. Davis, the nominee for the first position. During the balloting,
Governor Bryan, of Nebraska, was D avis' bitterest opponent.

I

F-- - -----

Puppeteers Give
Pleasing Revue
For Large Group
The marionette show given yes-
terday afternoon and evening at the
Mimes theater for the benefit of the
Women's League was the most suc-
cessful performance the toy actors
have ever presented in Ann Arbor.
The program was about evenly divided
between musical, terpsichorian, and
dramatic numbers- an arrangement
that prevented the occasional mon-
otony of puppet shows, and the dia-
logue and action were both fantastic
and highly amusing.
The clown Harlequin made his us-
ual charming, stiff little bows to the
audience and announced each act in,
verse. A Dutch dance was given by
Hans and Gretzel, two dolls of unus-
ual grace and remarkably limber
joints, and a song was sung by Gio-
vanni, a quaint Italian hurdy-gurdy
man.
The dramatic parts of the prpgram
were a short Japanese fable about a
clever beggar and an easily fooled
miser, the old mummer's play of St.
George and the Dragon, and the last
scene of "Midsummer Night's Dream,"
with its farcial tale of Pyramus and
Thisbe. The scenery of these plays
was quite modern and striking and
the costumes were executed with con-
siderable skill.'
The undoubted hit of the perform-
ance was Madame Galli, the prima'
donna. Her deep, throaty voice, hys-
terical gestures, and quaint system of
breathing gave real dramatic intensity
to her selections. The audience ap.
preciated her ability to the full and'
encored her with generous applause.
NIAAATRIP STRTS
AT 3 OCLOCK TODAY
Sixty-six people will leave for De-
trgit on the D. U. R. this afternoon
at 3:10 on the first leg of the excur-
sion to Niagara Falls. These excur-
sions have been a regular event for
the last twenty years and this year's
party is larger than usual. The trip
from Detroit to Buffalo and return'
will be made by way of the D & C
Steamship lines. The main point of
interest on the trip will be the gorgeI
below the falls rather than the falls
themselves. Professor Hobbs who isl
in charge of the expedition states that!
nowhere else in the world is there so
good a clock for measuring geological
time. The class will study. the gorge
and will work out the incidents of it
history.,

Coolidge's Son
Buried In New
England Home
Plymouth, Mass., July 10.-(By
AP)-In a little village cemetery
where the maples and evergreens
throw long shadows across the old
tombstones on the hillside, they buried
Calvin Coolidge sixteen year old son,
namesake of the president today. Re-
straining in a large part, outward
manifestation of their sorrow, the
President, Mrs. Coolidge, and John
the eldest son, stood with bowed
heads during the short simple com-
mitment service until a marine bugler
had blown "Taps" across the grave.
The cemetary where Calvin was laid
to rest lies on a little hill, dominated
by the Green mountains which over-
shadow in the family plot by the
mother of the President and kinsmen,
an in the same grassy row, where the
grave was dug, are spaces reserved
for the last resting places, of the
President, John and his mother.
Much of official Washington, in-
cluding each cabinet member, the
speaker of the nations House of Rep-
resentatives and the Governors of two
states attended th'e services. The
party from Washington came in the
closely guarded train which halted
at Northhampton in the Edwards Con-
gregational church where Calvin was
a member.
After the last notes of "Taps" had
echoed away, the family group went
for a short time to the old white farm
house of the President's father, Col.
John C. Coolidge where the President
took his oath of office, Aug. 3 a year
ago. Then accompanied by the elderj
Coolidge, the little family, broken
now by death, started on the journey
back to Washington.
KRAUS, COOLEY, AND DATES
AMY ON- BUSINESS
Dean Edward H. Kraus, of the Sum-
mer session, left yesterday for a vis-
it to Camp Davis, and the Biological
camp, both located near Cheboygan.
He will return to Ann Arbor on Mon-
day.
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley, dean of
the Colleges of Engineering and Arch-
itecture, in in New York attending the
Democratic convention. After the de-
parture of many of the Michigan dele-
gates, Dean Cooley was appointed as
a temporary delegate.
Dean Henry M. Bates, of the Law
school, will return next Tuesday from
Philadelphia where he is on busi-
Dess.

UsS. ATHLETES STILL
MANTAIN LEAD ITN
OLYMPIC CONTESTS,
Brooker, of Michigan, Places Third
in Pole Vault, Tying With
Petersson
PAAVO NURMI CAPTURES
A BRILLIANT VICTORY
Finnish Star Wins Double Victory in
1500 and 5000 Meter Runs, Most
Spectacular Races of Day
Olympic Stadium, Colombes,
France, July 10.-(By A.P.)-
James Brooker, captain elect of
the University of Michigan track
team for next year, and their star
polevaulter, placed third today in
the polevault competition here.
He tied with a Danish rival with
3:90 meters.
Olympic Stadium, Colombes, France,
July 10.-(By A.P.)-Despite the
spectacular double victory of Fin-
land's great runner, Paavo Nurmi,
who won the 1500 and 5000 meter runs
in Olympic record time, the United
States increased its point lead over
the little Scandinavian nation on the
fifth day of the Olympic competitions
today by winning both the pole vault
and the hammer throw.
The result of the hammer throw
final was as follows:
Fred B. Tootell, Boston A. A., first,
53.295 meters; Matt J. McGrath, New
York A. C., second, 50.84 meters; M.
C. Nokes, Great Britain, third, 48.875
meters; Ericson, Finland, fourth, 45.-
285 meters; James MacEachren, Olym-
pic club, San Francisco, sixth, 45.225
meters.
The pole vault final resulted as fol-
lows:
Glenn Graham, California Tech., and
Lee Barnes, Hollywood, Calif., tied for
first with 3.95 meters, equalling the
Olympic competitive record; James K.
Brooker, University of Mich and Pet-
ersson of Denmark, tied for third
place with 3.90 meters; Pickard, Can-
ada, fifth, with 3.80 meters; Ralph]
Spearow, University of Oregon, sixth
with 3.70 meters.
Olympic stadium, Colomnbes, July
10.-(By A.P.)-Within two hours this
afternoon, Paavo Nurmi, Finland's
great distance runner raced to spec-
tacular victory in the 1500 and 5000
meter events breaking the Olympic
record in both distances and winning
an Olympic trial such as no individual
has ever achieved before.-
Nurmi captured the 1500 meter run]
against a' fine field in 3 minutes, 53
3-5 seconds, clipping off 3 and 1-5 sec-
onds from the old record but failing]
by 2-5 of a second to equal his own;
world record. He won the 5000 meter,
from his fellow countryman, Willie
Ritola, in 14 minutes, 31 and 1-5 sec-]
onds, meeting both the Olympic and
world record by several seconds. ]
But even this super trial of Fin.
land's greatest ace, could not check
the onward march of the uniteds
States for the Americans demonstratd
their superiority in the pole vault and
hammer throw, the emaining finals of'
the fifth day of Olympic competition
and lengthened their mounting point
lead over the rival Scandavian na-

tion in the dual for international su-
preacy.
The glory which went in double
measure to Nurmi was also shared
for the day by two young Americans,
Fred Tootel, Boston A. A., who cap-;
tured the hammer throw by a decis-
ive margin from his countryman, Max
J. McGrath, New York A. C. veteran
of four Olympics and Lee Barnes, the
the 17 year old California high school
boy who won the pole vault laurels in+
the jump off with his coast rival Glenn
Graham, after they had tied for first
place at a height of 12 feet, 11 1-2
inches, which equalled the Olympic
record.
These three sent Finland's emblem
and the stars and stripes exclusively
up the victory pole for the day. But
another hero run tothe top in Joseph
Imbach, unsung and unheralded swift
whirlwind, who won his heat in the
second trials of the 400 meter run4
(Continued on Page Four) I

WHAT'S GOING ONI
FRIDAY
4:00-Women's League tea at Adelia
Cheever house, 516 East Madison
street. All women of the Universi-
ty are invited to attend.
5:00---The Romanticism of John Dav-
idson. Prof. R. M. Wenley, Natur-
al Science auditorium.
8:00-Public Health from the Interna-
tional Viewpoint. Dr. Hugh S.
Cumming, surgeon-general of the
United States Public Health Serv-
ice, Natural Science auditorium.
8:00-Student mixer - Wesley hall.
All students are invited.
8:15-Visitors' Night at the Observa-
tory. Admission by ticket only.
SATURDAY
S :00-Excursion No. 6- Burroughs
Adding Machine company. Lunch in
General Motors Building diningf
room. Trip through and behind
the scenes of the General Motors
office building. Trip ends at 3 p. in.
COMPLETE DRA9IN6t
IN NET TOURNEY9
Thirty-Two Men Entered in Singlest
r With Thirteen Teams Signed a
For Doubles
MATCHES WILL BE PLAYEDg
ON FERRY FIELD COURTS8
Drawings for the mens summer
session tennis tournament were heldt
yesterday at Moe's Sport Shop.9
Thirty two are entered In the singlesa
and thirteen teams in the doublesc
event. Matches will be played off onn
the Ferry field courts. Contestants
are asked to communicate with their
opponents in order that the matches
be played off as soon as possible.
The draw resulted as follows:
Singles
Wetzel,2563-J vs. Schaefer,2686;
Nagle, 1954-J vs. Shaak, 288-;
Greiner, 909 vs. Tuttle, 1165-J; Rush, t
1722-W vs. Bielfield, 1722-W; Prall,a
2665-J vs. Bradbury, 1668-W.e
Stimpson 1579-J vs. Welch 2174-R; N
Neihuss 1147-R vs. Swarts 2540-W; B.L
Ramsdell 2174-R vs. Nelson 2234-W;
Neff 1484 vs. Solomon 1722-W; Ear-a
hart 371 vs. Wilcox 3083-M; Reasonh
1484 vs. Celine ,1306-W; Moore 2288n
vs. Rosenberg 1808-W; Chapman 422-h
M vs. E. T. Ramsdell 2174-R; Gold-g
smith 3126-R vs. Sidwell 3003-JN
Scott 3003-J vs. Stevens 371; Jeromea
vs. Wright.I
Doubles IV
Bourke 131 and Jerome 371 vs. Neff_
and Reason 1484; Chapman 422-M andv
Nagle 1954-J vs. Wilcox 3083-M and
Lukumar 2759-R; Scott and Sidwell
3003-J vs. Celine and Rosenberg 18-
08-W; Wright and Kock 1417-J vs.
Earhart and Stevens 371; Goldsmith
3126-R and Oester 3003-J vs. Schaef-
er 686 and Greiner 909.
Bieldfleld and j partner, 1722-W,
Moore and Moore 2288, and Stimsong
and Prall 2665-J drew byes and willI
play in the second round.-
The tournament is open to all menc
regularly enrolled in the summerp
session. A number of prizes have been
offered for the winning players bye
George J. Moe, under whose direct-h
ion the tournament is being held.
WENLEY WILL TALK ONs

LIFEOFBOHN DAVIDSON
"The Romanticism of John. David-
son" is the subject of a lecture to bet
delivered Friday by Prof. R. M. Wen-n
ley, of the philosophy department. -
John Davidson, a Scottish poet, play-
wright and novelist, is not popularly
known, although he was the author
of numerous literary works of var-
ious kinds. He was born in Scotland
'in 1857, and died in 1909. His novels
were uniformly unsuccessful, although
they were written in a most unusual
romantic style. Among his poems
probably the most successful was ane
English adaptation of Copee's "Poura
la Couronne,' published in 1905. I
Philadelphia, July 10.-Charles E. J
Hughes, secretary of state, today was1
elected president of the American Barc
association at its annual meeting. 4

CUMMING TO SPEAK
TONIGUT ON HEATH
LECTURER SERIES
WILL DISCUSS PUBLIC HEALTH
FROM INTERNATIONAL
VIEWPOINT
LECTURER, DIRECTOR
U.S. HEALTH SERVICE
County Medical Society To Give DIn-
ner At Union In Honor Of Noted
Speaker
Dr. Hugh Cumming, Surgeon Gen-
eral of the United States Public
Health Service, will speak at 8 o'-
clock tonight in Natural Science aud-
itorium on the subject, "Public Health
from the International Viewpoint".
The lecture is one of the series of
public health lectures being given
th'is summer.
As head and director of the United
States Public Health service, Dr.
Cummings is throughly qualified to
talk on his topic, is knowledge of the
talk on his topic, his knowledge of the
conected. The work of his service is
guard the countr'y against the impor-
tation of diseases from foreign coun-
tries, to disseminate health inform-
ation, and cooperate with local boards
in keeping up public health. It has
charge of maritime regulations and
quarantines, and examination of immi-
grants.
In honor of Dr. Cumming, the pub-
lic health committee of the Wash-
tenaw County Medical society will
give a diner at the Michigan Union,
at which .the doctors of Washtenaw
county will have an opportunity to
meet him informally.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE GIVES
TEA AT CHEEVER HOUSE
University women will be enter-
tained Friday afternoon from 4 to 6
at the Women's League tea to be giv
en at AdeHia Cheever House, 516 East
Madison. The tea will be the second
League party of the summer.
Adelia Cheever is one of the cooper-
ative dormitories on the campus and
has recently been enlarged by an an-
nex. Mrs. T. S. Helen, director of the
house and members of the board of
governors will be in the receiving line.
Music will be furnished during the
afternoon by -Lucille Bellamy and
Helen Van Blois of the School of
Music.
All women conected with the Uni
versity are cordially invited to attend.
EARLLTON WELLS STAS
IN RUNNING FOR TITLE
Carlton Wells, Michigan amateur
golf champion, remained in the runn-
ing for the district golf title as a re-
sult of his victory Wednesday over H.
Sellman in the "first round of match
play.
Wells played the best golf he has
exhibited in the tournament, winning
his match by 4 and 3.
Johnny Malloy, 17-year-old Ann
Arbor youngster who provided the
sensation on the opening day with low
medal score, was eliminated in the

first round of match play Wednesday
by Roger Hill of the Detroit Golf club
who took the youth into camp by a
score of 4 and 3.
Wells was matched with R. J. Hut-
ton in the second round yesterday
morning, Hutton defeating Dennen of
Plum Hollow yesterday, 2 and 1.
BOMPERS, LABOR HEAD
CRITICALLY ILL IN NJ
New York, July 10.-(By A.P.)-
Samuel Gompers, president of the Am-
erican Federation of Labor, is critic-
ally ill at the hotel Shelburn, .Coney
Island, it was learned today. "Mr.
Gompers is very weak," said one of
his two secretaries. Two nurses are
$onstantly in attendance an4 !spe-
cialists from Manhattan were to ex-
amine Mr. Gompers late today.

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