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July 10, 1924 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-07-10

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PAGE TWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JULY 10, 1924

,

4e fumr
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SUMMER SESSION
Published every morning except Monday
during the summer session.
Member of the Associated Press. The As
socited"Press is exclusively entitled to the
see for republication of all news dispatches
credited-to it or not otherwise credited in
this paper and the local news published here-
r.
Fi tered at the postoffice, Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $ .50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building.
Communications, if signed as evidence o
good faith, will be published in The Summer
Daily at the discretion of the Editor. Un.
signed communications will receive no con-
sideration. The signature may be omitted in
publication if desired by the writer. The
Summer Daily does not necessarily endorse
the sentiments expressed in the communica-
tions.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephones 2414 and x76-M
MANAGING EDITOR
ROBERT G. RAMSAY
News Editor..........Robert S. Mansfield
Chairman of the Editorial Board......
....................Andrew E. Propper
City Editor...................Verena Moran
Night Editor.........Fredrick K. Sparrow
Telegraph Editor..........Leslie G. Bennets
Women' Editor...........Gwendolyn Dew
STAFF MEMBERS
Louise Barley Marion Walker
Rosalea Spaulding Leonard A. Keller
Virginia Bales Saul Hertz
Hans Wickland David Bramble
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER
CLAYTON C. PURDY
Advertising Manager.....Hiel M. Rockwell'
Copywriting Manager......Noble D. Travis
Circulation Manager.......Lauren C. Haight
Publication Manager......C. Wells Christie
Account Manager......a.......Byron Parker
THURSDAY, JULY 10, 1924
Night Editor-ROBT. S. MANSFIELD
I
It is necessary that educationf
should be the handmaid of cit-
izenship . . . Our institutions
are constantly, and very proper-
ly, the subject of political in-
quiry. Unless t eir nature
is comprehended, unless their
origin is understood, unless
their value is properly assessed,
the citizen falls ready prey to
those selfish agitators who would
exploit his prejudices to pro-
mote their own advantage... .
All of our learning and science,
our culture and our arts, will
be of little avail, unless they
are supported by high charact-
er, unless there be honor, and
truth, and justice; unless our
material resources are support-
ed by moral and spiritual re-
cources . . . Unless these abide,
American sitizenship will be
found unequal to its task.
PRESIDENT COOLIDGE.

his products more cheaply. No one
will deny that by setting a low price
on his cars, others have reduced
thjeirs and the automobile is now
within the reach of many. His trac-
tors have been a boon to the farmer.
His flour, the farmer's '{ e finds
"just as good as any other brand
and it costs considerably less."
Ford is wise in putting his money
and effort into these necessities and
in that he is doing his fellow-men a
great service. On the other hand, he
is at the same time enriching him-
self. To be sure, occasionally, he
does put his money to uses other than
strictly business. His buying up
places for the benefit of the pubp
is praise-worthy.
But the fact that this plane landing
field adjoins the new administration
building of the Ford Motor company
in Dearborn leads one to believe that
his announcement regarding the in-
tention not to go into the airplane
business should read "at least not this
minute." It seems inconceivable that
he should not eventually do so. As a
matter of fact, it is his duty to do so,
since he has demonstrated his ability
to turn out good engines at a low
cost. At any rate, our richest citizen
deserves our thanks for rendering his
country such timely assistance, re-
gardless of his motives.
FROM GREECE TO FRANCE
Athletes of all nations are gather-
ed in France at the Stadium of Col-
ombes to compete in the Olympic
games. Almost three thousand years
ago, in a similar manner, the young
men of Greece came from the towns
and countryside to the Olympiad and
contested for the crown of olive that
was the guerdon of the victor.
The Olympic games are a direct re-
vival of the old Greek games and
mark a vertiable renaissance of
sport. Young men from all the cor-
ners of the earth, speaking many
tongues, have assembled outside the
walls of Paris for the international
contest.
This is an era of sport. In this
country, and among other nations as
as well, the educational system has
developed to a point where it may be
said to almost grant athletics prior-
ity over studies. The pages of Homer
and the sporting pages of the daily
journals have this in common that
they both worship athletic heroes. In
some ways this is a beneficial tend-
ency, in some ways it is to be re-
gretted. It is to be feared because
it migit be overdone; it must never
be allowed to go so far as to bring
about a worship of brawn and a scorn
for brain.
But this mania for sport is benefic-
ial in many respects. To the Greeks
the Olympaid was a gathering in
which Greek youth gave of its best.
The modern Olympic games, too, teach
youth to give its best, a lesson that,
once well learned, will result in great
social progress and improvement.

wish to- smoke should do so,-except
where it is prohibited, but also be-
lieves that those who honor their Un-
iversity should abide by its laws.
M. E. M.

OASTED OLL
r
DAVIS
GOT
IT

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As per the crumbs, former U. S.
ambassador to Great Britain and for-
iner congressman from West Virginia
John W. Davis received the Dem-
cratic nomination for the Presidency
of the United States. They are yet to
nominate a man for the Vice-Pr'esi-
dency, but it come as a distinct relief
that they have accomplished the pri-
mary task which they set out to do.
Now the Night Editors wont have to
rack their brains any more for head-
lines including the wo'rds "Smith,"
"McAdoo,"' "Democratic and "Unable
to Pick Man" without ever repeating
themselves. Two weeks of that sort
journalistic lives have been lost by
suicide over that one thing already.
Now that its done, we're glad to see
that they followed out our prediction
and nominated Mr. Davis. We allus
said they would after Mac and Smit-
ty got into their scrap and gummed
the works. Bets may now be placed
on the VP nomination.
And by the way, who is this sub-
frosh who goes around acting as
though he has been here all his life?
The other day this bozo barges up to
us and says:
"Disgustingly hot weather isn't it?
Say, what do you think of this Mich-
igan Daily?" -
"We reserve judgment," says we in
a nasty tone of voice.
"Well,' says he, "I think it's rot-
ten. I could put out a better paper
all alone. They oughta have a comic
strip in it, to begin with."
"Why don't you try it,' We inquires,
trying hard to be sarcastic. "About
the comic strip, though, don't you
think that there are hardly enough
youngsters here to warrant it?"
"Are you getting personal?" says
he, "and if you are, why just get over
t, because I know what I'm talking
about."
"What paper, if any, have you play-
ed with?" was our snappy comeback.
"I was the editor of the Baih High
School semi-annual Blat," he states,
haughtily.
At this point the News and Manag-
ing editors of our little sheet ambled
up and caught the last few remarks.
n one breath they asked him if he
thought he was so good why he didn't
come up and work on the paper. his
reply formed his last words:
"I haven't been here a semester
yet."
TO YOU
To you I dedicate this poem-
It's all about our telephone-
It hangs upon the wall,
And it doesn't ring atal.
The other night I called a guy-
I always was most awful shy.
And sez I--Whacha doing now?
How to answer me he don't know
how.
So sez he-of your business
That's none. Nevertheless
To you I must confess-
I'm in bed-my clothes to press.
I offered to help him all I could-
"Oh-he says-You're awful good-
But already have another pressing
Engagement. I'm offa him for good.
The other day we stated we didn't
have a cut of the City Editor. She
gave us one to run, and we run it
below. The costume proves without
a doubt that we have cold weather in
Ann Arbor, even if summer school
students will not believe it. The
J'plhoto was taken on the boulevard
during# the classic semi-annual ski
ineet.
LODRIT

THE C. E.
* *1 *
There. Now we have done our duty
and feel relieved,
In Serious Vein
Seriously and sincerely, we wish to
congratulate Prof. William H. Hobbs
on the honor bestowed upon him by
the French government.
Taman.

EDITORIAL COMMENT I
THEY WENT ON
(The New York Times)
While it is too soon to despair of I
government by party, many of us have
become heartily ashamed of it. The
sullen acrimonies of the Democratic
strife are not ennobled even by their I
ferocity. Nor does the contrasting
harmony of the Republicans offer
much consolation; for the Democratic I
civil war began in a fight for a sound
principle, while the Republicans at-
tained harmony by ignoring it as be-
neath the notice of gentlemen.
Yet, from Madison Square Garden,
look up to Everest. The unconquered
mountain is not unconquerable. Per-
haps it was conquered by those two
men who disappeared in the mist, still
going upward. They never came
back-Irvine with the fiery dedication !
of his youth, Mallory whose battle
with the mountain had become a per-
sonal combat. They knew, on that
late afternoon just below the summit,
with darkness closing in and bringing
such cold as no man can resist, that
they had climbed higher than men
ever climbed before. But they had not
reached the peak, so they went on.
They knew that if they climbed higher
they might never come back, yet they
went on.
Man's victory over Nature is an-
cient history. Ever since thick-skulled,
hairy men learned to defy the ice
sheet, Nature has been beaten. What
the world has been wondering is
whether Man can ever conquer him-
self, or if that self is worth conquer-
ing. Snarling Democrats and smirk-
ing Republicans say no. Mallory and
Irvine say yes.
A Texas farmer went a-fishing in
a local river. The fish saw him com-
ing, and-if we must believe one of
last night's papers-took fright, scur-
ried ashore, climbed up a tree and had
to be brought down with a gun.
Please page Baron Munchausen.
Why didn't they include marathon
dancing in the Olympic games? The
United States might have garnered a
few more points.

I
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LIGHT
LUNCHES

709 North University
Superior Service

CANOE
LUNCHES

i

CHOICE
CANDIES

DRINKS &
SUNDAES

_ i

1

If you Cannot Find it
Or
Forget it
TRY
THE
COLLEGE GROCERY
Phone 8655 516 E. William
Open Evenings & Sunday

..p

i ,'''
- -

THE NATION PAUSES
The world must move along. Noth-
ing, no calamity however great, can
prevent the sun from rising or day
from succeeding night. Man in the
same way must keep going. But yes-
terday the nation paused for a few
minutes in its worldly affairs to of-.
fer President and Mrs. Coolidge its
sympathy in their hour of sorrow.
That sympathy is not offered to the
President and the First Lady of the
land, but rather it is offered to a
father and mother who have lost a
son. It thus symbolizes the world's
sympathy for all fathers and mothers
whomust sustain the loss of a belov-
ed child.
This country can ill sustain and
badly spare the loss of such lads as
young Coolidge. It is their youthful
shoulders that must. in the future
assume the destiny of the nation.
The end was untimely, but alas, as
one soul passes on another always
comes to take its place.
HENRY FORD AGAIN
Henry Ford and his son, Edsel, an-
nounce.a gift of a field approximate-
ly three-quarters of a mile square as
a .,landing for aircraft. They furn-
ish this field "as a civic development
and a national patriotic move" and
.announce that there is "no intention
on the part of the Ford Motor com-
pany to go into the airplane busi-
ness, other than to watch its develop-
ment."
The citizens of his community
should and will express their grati-
tudeto the Fords for coming to the
aid of commercial aviation at this
early stage of progress. But with
Ford's Muscle Shoals project fresh
ilmind, one cannot help impugn his
motives.
henry Ford is not a philanthropist,
in the usual sense. He is, however, a
shrewd business man. He has proved
that he can produce anything he un-
dertakes more efficiently than any of
his competitors, and that he can sell

CAMPUS OPINION
To the Editor:
I have just read the communication
in Wednesday's Daily, signed "C. C.
M." with regard to smoking in Uni-
versity buildings, concluding "Why
should we curb our desires because of
the whims of few non-users?"' The
question4 of smoking in University
buildings is not a matter of whims.
Neither is it an attempt on the part
of anybody to interfere with the mor-
al principles of other individuals. It
is, instead, an ordinary -matter of ne-
cessity. In accordance with the re-
quirements of the insurance compan-
ies carrying fire insurance the Re-
gents have prohibited smoking in Un-
iversity buildings with the exception
of private laboratories, private offices,
and assigned smoking rooms. These
regulations are posted in the prin-
cipal hallways of the University build-
ings. The co-operation of all mem-
bers of the University, faculty stu-
dents, and officials, is asked in the
observance of this necessary and rea-
sonable regulation of the Regents.
SHIRLEY W. SMITH,
Secretary of the University.
31ORE DISAGIEEMENT
To the Editor:
Our friend, C. C. M., who thinks it
a small matter that students, faculty,
and officials of the University should
smoke in the halls and corridors of
the various buildings, might consider
the fact that whoever does this isl
breaking a law of the University, laidj
down by the Board of Regents under
the heading "Rules Relative to Firt
Hazards," a copy of which, I believe,
may be found in every campus build-
ing. The part referring to smoking
reads, "Smoking, except in private
offices, private laboratories, or as-
signed smoking rooms, is prohibited."
The writer believes that those who

THE HUTZEL SHOP
ANNOUNCES
\
The Annual .July Sale
Coats and Suits at
HALF-PRICE
Four lots of Dresses at
greatly reduced prices
Many other Specials
MAIN AT LIBERTY

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