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July 10, 1924 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1924-07-10

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THE WEATHER
FAIR AND COOLER
TQDAY

41v
AL

4bp

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XV. No. 17. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JULY 10, 1924 PRICE FIVE CENTS

PUPPETEERS WILL
APPEAR TWICE IN
REVUE HERE TODAY
WOMEN'S LEAGRUE. SPONSORS
PERFORMANCES IN ANN
ARBOR
HOLLISTER PUTS GROUP
ON PLANE WITH SARG'S
'St. George and the Dragon", "Pyr-
amus and Thisby" Form Part Of
Program
Two performances of the "Puppet
Revue" will be given at 3 o'clock and
at 8 o'clock today in the Mimes cam-
pus theater, by the Puppeteers. The
revue includes: "St. George and the
Dragon", an old English Mummers
play, "Pryamus and Thisby" from act
5 of "A Midsummer Night's Dream"
and " Galli, the Prima Donna."
The Puppet Revue is sponsored by
the Women's League.' Proceeds from
the entertainment will be turned over
to the Women's League building pro-
gram.
The "Puppeteers" is a group of uni-
versity students who have perfected
their art to a place where Professor
Hollister declared them to be not in-
ferior to the famous Tony Sarg. The
Marionettes are a distinct form of
dramatic entertainment, whose his-
torydates back to the ancient Punch
and Judy shows of England and Italy.
Last summer the "Puppeteers"
gave over 60 successful performances.
After their Ann Arbor performances
they will go to 30 northern Michigan
resorts for a seven week's tour.
Of them the Albion Recorder says:
"The good sized audience of last even-
ing was delighted with the novel en-
tertainment, and no doubt if the Pup-
peteers were to return to Albion they
would be greeted with a crowded
house."
ES5ERY SUCCUMBS
TO HEART FAILUR91E
Washtenaw County School Comis-
soner Dies At His Home In Ann
Arbor Tuesday Night
HAS HELD PRESENT POST
WITH COUNTY SINCE 1907
Evan EIssery, Washtenaw county
school commissioner, well-known
throughout the state for his work
among rural school stud(nts 'died
suddenly Tuesday night at his home,
918 South State St.
Mr. Essery had been listening to a
concert being broadcast over radio.
He began to read a newspaper and
when it dropped to the floor, Mrs. Es-
sery went to him, but he was dead.
Death, which came about 9 o'clock,
was attributed to heart disease.
Evan Essery was born Nov. 21
1856 at Hatherleigh, Devonshire, coun-
ty, England. He came to this coun-
try when he was 16 years old. In 1892
he went to Manchester as superintend-
ent of schools where he remained un-
til 1907 when he was elected for his'
first term as county school commis-
soner. He had served four full terms
in this office and one year of his
fifth.

Mr. Essery was graduated from the
Michigan State Normal college of
Ypsilanti in 1897. In 1908 he receiv-
ed the degree of bachelor of pedagogy
from the same institution. Mr. Essery
was chairman of the rural section of
the Michigan State Teacher's associ-
ation and had held other prominent
offices in the association.
YE TEMPUS
sure does fugit! And tempus is
cash! Therefore, make haste to
save time and money by consist
ent use of Daily Classifieds.
Hustle up and
SEE
JIMMIE, JR.
THE AD TAKER

Summer Session
Popular, Help ful
Says Dean Kraus
More han 3, 000 men and women
have been attendling American un-
versities since the close of t~e regu-
lar school year this June, says Dean
Edward IH. Kraus. lie attributes the
large number enrolled to the nation-
wide development of plans to keep
higher educational institutions at
work the year round. Growing pop-
ularity of tthe summer study idea is
further attested by its adoption by
secondary an dhigh schools, the dean
declares. .
Of the total number of summer stu-
dents registered this year, nearly one
.third are studying in the state of
Michigan. The large percentage for
this state may be accounted for par-
tially by the opening of numerous
small schools for summer work. All
together the state has 12,000 of the
35,000 students now at work.
Enrollment here reached its low
mark just after the war in 1918,,when
1301 ,students attended the Univer-
sity. In 1919, registration increased
to 1961. In 1920 it was 2194; in 1921,
2794; in,1922, 2786; in 1923, 3066. The
present total for this year 3160, and
authorities expect that the figure will
be 3200 before the end of the session.)
Records for the registration of lit-
erary and graduate students during
the same period show a more than
proportional increase in the gradu-
ate school. For this purpose educa-
tional students, all of whom are ui-
dergraduates, are considered with
those in the literary school, the in-
crease since 1920 amounting to ap-
proximately 39 per cent. The in-
crease in the Graduate school is 124
per cent. In 1920 there was one grad-
uate in seven; now the proportion is
one in four and a half.
Dean Kraus looks upon the rising
enrollment as a consequence of the
emphasis lately placed upon advanced
work. Attractive courses are being
offered which appeal to the graduate
student. Also, summer sessions un-
dertake to cover not only essential
parts of the curriculum taught during
the year, but they include special
courses to aid and interest certain
students, especially school adminis-
trators. Public school systems are
basing salaries now upon the self-
improvement of the teacher.
Higher requirements for educators,
more interest among students, and
the development of better facilities for
summer study are among the fact-
ors which will continue to bring stu-
dents to the universities after the re-
gular session.
Local Artists
Win Applause
of Audience
Mrs. Ava Comm-Case, pianist, and
Mr. Julius Niehaus, basso, were solo-
ists at the third of the faculty concerts
last night. Both artists are compar-
atively new to Ann Arbor, Mrs. Case
being one of the newest additions to
the piano faculty of the School of
Music and Mr. Niehaus being a new
arrival in Ann Arbor. Mrs. Case op-
ened her recital with Grieg's Sonata,
Op. 7, following with a group of small
numbers, extremely modern in their
import, and closing her program with

the Polonaise of MacDowell, the most
splendid of all of the American's
compositions. She plays with a great
deal of sympathy and power, but her
pedaling in the Grieg Sonata was too
insistent, obstructing the clarity of
her tone, and the beauty of her
phrasing. She was best in the small
numbers, where her natural musici-
ansh'ip, and artistry were well suited
to the quiet rythm of the songs.
Julius Niehaus, *the pupil of James
Hamilton, a Chicago singer who has
come here to continue his studies un-
der Hamilton, has a fine bass voice,
powerful, robust, yet capable of the
most beautiful effects when singing
sotto voce. His program was light
but pleasing, from the sombre majesty
of Beethovens's In Questa Tomba Ob-
scure to the rollicking 'swing of Roll-
ing down to Rio. His is a bass voice,
deep and vibrant and at the same time
musical, colorful ad dramatic yet at

DEMOCRATS NAME
DAVI91S FOR CHIEF
IN 103RD BALLOT
liltAIOO FAILS TO TRANSFER

DEMOCRA TIC NOMINEE

STRENGTH1 TO MEREDITH
IN FIGHT
NOMINATION MADE BY
ACCLAMATION OF BODY
'ichigan Casts 29.5 For Davis In
Last Roll Call; Bryan Opposiion
Fails
BULLETIN
New York, July 9.-(By AP)-Sen.
Thomas J. Walsh of Montana refused
the Democratic Vice Preisdential nom-
ination here late last night.
Madison Square Garden, New York,
July 9.-John W. Davis of West Vir-
ginia was nominated for president to-
day by the Democratic national con-
vention. The opposition of William
Jennings Bryan and the attempt of
William Gibbs McAdoo to deliver his
strength to Meredith failed to stop
him. The decision came on the 103rd
ballot.
Beginning with this morning's bal-
lotting the movement to Davis gather-
ed a momentum which could not be
retarded and gradually but surely
through the succeeding ballots the
votes flopped over into the Davis
column as state after state either in-
creased its offering to him or turned
over its whole quota.
Bryan's opposition to Davis was
swept away in the rain of Davis votes
which swept over the convention.
On the ballot, which nominated
Davis, Michigan voted: Davis 29.5;
Walsh, .5.
Acclamationi Granted
The attempt of the McAdoo forces
to make Meredith the successor to the
McAdoo strength commanded a follow-
ing but the Iowan was only a bad third
and when the Davis flood was rising
so fast that all other candiltes were
being swept before it, Iowa. Meredith's
home state, withdrew him from the
contest and voted for Davis.
The scenes of disorder swept the1
convention as everybody clamoed for
a chance to join the winning forces.
When the uproar was at its height
Thomas Taggart of Indiana mounted
a chair and moved the nomination of
Mr. Davis by acclamation. The mo-
tion was carried with a roar and'
Chairman Walsh shouted:
"The chair declares the Hon. John
Wt. Davis the nominee of this con-
vention."
SIXTH TRIP INCLUDES
ADING MACHINE PLNT
Tours of the Burroughs Adding
Machine Company's plant and the
General Motors building will make
up the sixth excursion of the Sum-
mar session on Saturday. The party
will leave for Detroit on the D. U. R
at 8 o'clock in the morning from the'
corner of Packard and State streets.
At the Burroughs plant a complete£
inspection will be made o' the intri-
cate processes involved in making thet
vs ious models (f adding and calcu-
lating machines. Special guides will
conduct the partjr through the plant
to explain the 1oinplicated details of
manufacture. Lunch will be eaten in
the General Motors building dining
room. After luncl a trip through the
building will he taken. This is said
to he the largest office building in the
world and, the excursionists will have1
an opportunity to see how many de-l
t"ls involved in the administration of
an institution of this size are taken
care of. The trip will end at 3 o'clock.
Tt will be necessary chat, all those

w-o care to take part in this excur-
Oon leave their nanes at the Summer
s ion office, room 8 Universily hall
1--cre 6 o'clo .l Friday night.
New York, July 9.-New York City's'
new municipal radio station, WCNY,
will broadcast every night about
8:30 o'clock (7:30 p. m. Detroit time.)
Its first program was given last night
with an address by Mayor John F.
Hylan. The wave length is 526 met-
ers.

John W. Davis

Former U. S. Ambassador to Gre at Britain
from West Virginia who has been nam ed by the
vention as their nominee for the presi dency.

and former congressman
Democratic Nationa- Con-

JAMES LECTURES
ON PERU DESERTS
Illustrated Talk Delivered By Geo-
graphiy Professor On Observations
In the Arid Areas
TELLS OF MWFICULTY IN
TRANSPORTATION To COAST
Prof. Preston E. James, of the geo-
graphy department, delivered a lec-
ture on "Geographical Observations
in the Great Deserts of Peru" yester-
day at 5 o'clock in Natural Science
auditorium.
Professor James illustrated his lec-
ture with a series of lantern slides,
showing the geographical features of.
that part of South America.
"From a geographical standpoint,
the study of the problems of the des-
ert are always very simple," said
Professor James. Due to the \a.ck
of moisture the physical changes in
a desert are few, and the study of the
problems of the deserts of Peru are
easier than the study of other des-
erts of the world because there are
practically no physical changes at all
in those regions. "No other desert
in the world shows the entirely rain-
less condition that the desert of At-
acama does, in that part of the
globe."
The deserts of Peru lie along the east
coast of that country. This is due
to the fact that the Andes mountains
shut off the trade winds, and the lack
of moisture leaves these areas near
the coast totally barren. These re-
gions are different from all other des-
erts, in that there is no growth of
vegetation, not even the so-called des-
ert shrub, on them. The coastal
mountains are like these areas in this
respect that they also are absolutely
barren.
Discussing the industries and char-
acter of Peru, Professor James stated
that most of the products of Peru
have to go through the coastal des-
erts on their way to the coast for
shipment. This makes the problem
of getting the exports to the coast a
costly and dangerous process.
Walla Walla, Wash., July 9.-Walla
Walla now boasts of the lowest taxi-
cab rates of any city of its size; the
largest concern here recently announc-
a flat rate of 25 cents to any part of
the city. An 'increase in business has
resulted in the step, it was stated.
By photographing the stars from
time to time, a machine known as "the
Zenith tube," is said to indicate the
distance the land slips each year.

DELMIVER [0111HLECTURE
"Public HealtiX From An International
Standpoint," Is Topic To Be
Discussed
WILL BE ENTERTAINED
BY MEDICAL SOCIETY
Surgeon General Hugh S. Cum-
mings who will speak at 8 o'clock
tomorrow night in Natural Science
auditorium, will have as his subject,
"Public Health from an International
Standpoint." Dr. Cummings is the
head of the United States Public
Health service, the largest official
health agency in the country. ,-
The United States Public Health
service stands as an outpost for the
protection of this country against the
introduction of diseases from for-
eign countries. As such it has charge
of all maritime regulations and
quarantines, and examination of all
immigrants. His knowledge of the
subject he is to speak on comes direct.
ly from the work with which Surgeon
General Cummings is connected. This
is one of the series of public health
lectures.
In honor of Surgeon General Cum-
mings, a dinner is being arranged by
the public health committee of the
Washtenaw County Medical society.
The dinner is scheduled to be held
at the Michigan Union at 6 o'clock
tomorrow. It is hoped by the commit-
tee in charge of the affair that the
doctors o\ Washtenaw county will
be given an opportunity to meet Dr.
Cummings informally during the two
hours which he will be able to spend
with them. A large attendance is an-
ticipated.
Former Regent Is
Honored By Sons
In memory of their father, Oliver
Lyman Spaulding, a bronze tablet has
been erected in Alumni Memorial Hall
by his sons, one of which, John C.
Spaulding is an alumnus of the uni-
versity graduating in 1897. The tab-
let has been recently accepted by the
board of regents of the University.
Oliver Lyman Spaulding was a col-
onel in the 23rd Michigan infantry
also a Brigadier General of the U. S.
Volunteers, and a member of the Board
of Regents from 1959-1864. He was
born in 1833 and died in 1922.
George Washington was the first
decendant of "common people" but he
had the blood of practically every
medieval royal line.

U. St HOLDS LEAD
IN OLYMPIC MEET
THROUGH 4 DAYS
AMERICANS HAVE 135 POINTS,
FINLAND 73, AND GREAT
!BRITAIN 34
SCHOLZ WINS 200 METER
RUN, PADDOCK FOLLOWS
Turn Of Head Costs Californian First
Placesin Race Won By Team Mate
Scholz, N. Y. A. C.
BULLETIN
James K. Broker, '25L, has qualified
for the finals in the pole vault togeth-
er with the three other American
vaulters at the Olympic games.
Olympic Stadium, Colombes, France,
July 9.-(By AP)-America, with her
mighty track and field forces is stead-
ily piling up a formidable margin
over her gallant rival Finland and
also squared accounts today with
Great Britain in the spectacular con-
test of the two nations for the Olympic
speed laurels, when the veteran Am-
erican whirlwind, Jackson V. Scholz,
New York A. C., swept to triumph in
the 200 metre dash. The Stars and
Strips went up on the victory pole
with the greatest thrill that has yet
marked the historic athletic fray.
Finishing the last ten meters like a
catapult, Scholz won a sensational
race by inches from his countryman,
Charles W. Paddock, who, after lead-
ing to win a few strides of the taps
threw what seems to have been cer-
tain victory for him to the wind by
slightly turning his head to see his
closest rival. That fleeting instant
of waywardness cost the Californian
the glory of an Olympic cown but
did not change the final ttiumph of
the United States.
When dusk settled over the fourth
day of the stirring competition, the
United States had taken a command-
ing lead. With twelve events, nearly
half the program completed, the wear-
ers of the shield had amassed a total
of 135 points, nearly twice as many as
Finland, which was in second place
with 73. Great Britain third with 34
1-2.
First place honors also rest with the
Americans who had taken 6 events,
while the Finns had captured 4 and
Great Britain 2.
WHAT'S GOING ON
THURSDAY
3:00-Marionette show-Conducted by
Mr. F. G. Brown and Mr. R. B.
Henderson; under the auspices of
the Women's League, Mimes thea-
ter. Admission will be charged.
4:10-Upper Room Bible class meets
in Lane Hall.
7:00-Choral Union rehearsal-School
of Music.
8:00-Marionette Show--Mimes thea-
ter. Admission will be charged.
8:15-Visitors' Night at the Obesrva
tory. Admission by ticket only.
FRIDAY
4:00-Women's League tea at Adeia
Cheevem house, 516 East Madison
street. All women of the Universi-
ty are invited to attend.

5:00-The Romanticism of John Dav-
idson. Prof. R. M. Wenley, Natur-
al Science auditorium.
8:00-Public Health from the Interna-.
tional Viewpoint. Dr. Hugh S.
Cumming, surgeon-general of the
United States Public Health Serv-
ice, Natural Science auditorium.
:15-Visitors' Night at the Observa-
tory. Admission by ticket only.
SATURDAY
8:00-Excursion No. 6- Burroughs
Adding Machine company. Lunch in
General Motors Building dining
room. Trip through and behind
the scenes of the General Motors
office building. Trip ends at 3 p. m.
Verdun, France, July 9.-Gen. John
J. Pershing and the members of the
American Battle Monuments Com-
mission arrived here yesterday for
an inspection of the battlefield cem-
eteries.

Press Bldg.

Maynard St. I the same time, lyrical.

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