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July 04, 1924 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-07-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, 3TJLY 4, 1924

THE SUMMED. MI C I DAILY

PAGN THRM

FRIDAY, JULY 4, 1924 THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

BUILDINGS COMPLETE
AT BIOLOGICAL STATION
Building operations have been com-
pleted at the Biological station situ-
ated on the shore of Douglas lake in
Cheboygan county, according to a
message received by Dean Edward
H. Kraus, of the Summer session.
A mess hall, 70 by 22 feet and 9 feet
at the eaves has been erected which
has a seating capacity of 112 people
and of 120 people by the use of a small
amount of table space. Two labora-
tories, one stockroom and 12 of the
unit houses have also been completed.
At the present time, a sidewalk is
being laid from the middle of the camp
to halfway through the men's portion
of the camp and from the mess tent
almost to Houghton hall. Material for
the walk was obtained by sawing up
old tent floors and the old mess tent
floors.
The new buildings are replacing
tents which have been used in prev-
ious years. A new dock at the camp
is under construction and partly
completed.
WASHINGTON REMAINS
Washington remained the sensation
of the American league last week,
holding first place by a two-game
margin over Detroit on Monday. New
York was in third place, close on the
Tigers' heels. Boston and St. Louis
were in a tie at the half-way mark,
with Chicago, Cleveland, and the long-
suffering Athletics trailing in the or-
der named. The race in the American
league is still very uncertain. New
York can be expected to make a des-
perate fight to regain the lead. It
looks like a close finish this fall.
In the National loop New York had
a comfortable lead on Chicago for
first place. The Giants look like win-
ners, although Chicago has a good
chance. Brooklyn held down third
place, followed by Pittsburgh. In the
lower division Cincinnati, Boston, the
Phillies, and St. Louis are fighting to
keep out of the cellar. The Phillies
and the Cards were in the last two
places, the Cards holding the buck on
Monday.
Baseball Games
Will Start Monday
The first baseball game of the sum-
mer will be played by the two teams
of the school of education on Monday,
July 7, at 4:30 p. m. Principals and
superintendents will battle then for
initial honors on Ferry Field. The
series of games will progress at the
rate of two every week until the end
of the session.
Factory production of ice cream in
this country last year was 300,000,000
gallons.

Try Amerca First For Art,
Slogan Boomed By Architect

I}

Ed Faculty Gets
Praise For Books
Special notice is accorded members
of the education faculty for work done
under the direction of Prof. Guy M.
Whipple in the Journal of Education-
al Research for June.
Prof. Whipple himself started the
series with a collection of "Prob-
lems in Educational Psychology",
which was published recently. Lat-
er he edited five books of problems
written by other Michigan faculty
men. To date "Problems in Secondary
Education", by J. B. Edmonson, "Pro-
blems in Elementary-School Instruct-
ion", by Clifford Woody, "Problems in
the Administration of a School Sys-
tem", by J. B. Edmonson and Erwin E.
Lewis, "Problems of the High School
Teacher", by J. B. Edmonson and Ral-
eigh Schorling, and "Problems of the
Rural Teacher by Marvin S. Pittman,
have been published.
The Journal quotes topics under
consideration in the six pieces of
work, and comments upon them as of
unusual interest and practical value.
Specific references cited by the auth-
ors are praised for the opportunity

that they give for more detailed study.
The series as a whole presents, it de-
clared, "something new, something
significant, and something vital for
the use of teachers and students of
education."

GROOME'S BATHING BEACH
Whitmore Lake
Refreshments Of All Kinds

China with its great population has
only half as many automobiles as
Hawaii.
Little investment - big returns,
the Daily Classifieds.--Adv.

JEAN GOLDKETTE'S
FAMOUS ORCHESTRA
- AT -
The New Lake House Pavilion
WHITMORE LAKE
Friday and Saturday Nights
JULY 4 AND 5

Rane's Quality Shoppe
WHITMORE LAKE
SPECIAL STEAK DINNERS
Reasonable prices
Lunches Ice Cream
Phone 18

Alfred C. Bossum and model of the BuM alo building that will have a pyr-
anidal top
"Try America first for art and arc hitecture," is the slogan advocated
by Alfred C. Bossum of New York, no ted architect, who has offered prizes
in a world wide competition for desig ns based on native American art, in
an effort to bring into use neglected art and architecture on the North
American continent.
INowIShowin

Admission. $1.00

Tax extra

C A R R I C i
Pop. Mat. Tues. Thurs. & Sat. 25c & 50c
Nights 5c - 50c - 75c and $1.00
6th Week 15th Season
THE BONSTELLE COMPANY
A Thrilling and Beautiful Love Story
"SECRETS"
NEXT MONDAY-" YOU AND I"

..........

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-

,

Now Playing
"THE ARIZONA EXPRESS"
With David Butler and Pauline Starke
The Yale Uuiversity Press pre-
sents "The Declaration of
Independence."
Sunday through Wednesday
Lloyd Hughes and Louise Fazenda in
"THE OLD FOOL."
"Long Live the Ring.'
By H. C. Witwer
COMING
L-ew Cody in "THE SECRETS OF PARIS"

Now Showing
Gladys Hulette in
"THE NIGHT MESSAGE"
"LEATHERSTOCKING"
By James Fenimore cooper.
Sunday through Tuesday
Charles Hutchison in
"SURGING SEAS"
With a splendid cast including
David Torrence.
Coming-Laura LaPlante in
"EXCITEMENT "

I

,

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I~J

UNPAID
SUBSCRIPTIONS
TO
THE SUMMER

TODAY AND TOMORROW

e

I

I

I

ICHIGAN

DAILY

Should be paid by

HEALTH SERVICE OPEN
The privilege of the University
Health service will be extended
to all students of the University
Summer session. The Health
service is located at the corners
of Washtenaw and Volland ave-
nues and will be open from 9 to
12 o'clock daily except Sundays
and from 2 to 5 o'clock, Satur-
days and Sundays excepted. All
students who care to take ad-
vantage of it are given free med-
ical service.
Physicians are available at all
times by calling the Health ser-
vice infirmary, University 186-M.

July 15th.

Other-

'I

I

wise the $2 rate
will be charged.
Send your check
to the Press bldg.,
or come to the
office any time be-
fore Tuesday, the
15th.
THE SUMMER
MICHIGAN DAILY

ko w %0

.

CLASSIFIEDS

A

LOST
LOST - Tuesday evening near the
campus, gold wrist watch, Hamp-
ton make, black ribbon braclet and
gold clasp. Phone 1314-W.
LOST - Gold Eversharp. Reward.
2442-W. 1020 Michigan Ave.
LOST - Gold, engraved Eversharp
pencil; initials H. M. "R. on barrel.
Lost the evening of June 5 at the
Library or Union Reading room.
Please call Rockwell, 960 or 3104.
Subscribe for The Summer Mich-
igan Daily.-Adv.
WatchRepairing
FINEST Watch Repairing in the city.
Arnold's State Street Jewelry.

1 Fm

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Read The Daily

"Classified" ColumnsI

14'

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