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July 04, 1924 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-07-04

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T,4 r

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THE WEATHER
FAIR AND WARMER
TODAY

f.fr isgan

L3ttu

ASSOCIATED
PRES
DAY AND NIGHT WPIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XV. No. 13 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JULY 4, 1924 PRICE FIVE CENTS
f

THIRD PARTY OPENS
CONVENTION TODA1
DELEGATES GAHER
PROGRESSIVES' MEETING TO BE
HELD IN CLEVELAND
OHIO
COMMUNISTS BARRED
FROM SEATS IN BODY
Committee Asks LaFollette Permis-
sion To Use Name For President-
ial Nomination
Washington, July 3.-Senator La-
Follette intends to hold his peace with
reference to his plans to run for presi-
dent until a Democratic candidate has
been selected in New York, it was
said today by a group of his support-
ers who held a conference here.
Cleveland, Ohio., July 3.-(By AP)-
Senator Robert M. LaFollette of Wis-
consin today formally was asked to
permit the use of his name as a presi-
dential candidate by the national com-
mittee of the Conference for Pro-
gressive Political Action which opens
its convention here tomorrow.
A subcommittee drew up a message
to the senator which was submitted
to the full committee for approval and
then dispatched to Washington.
A favorable reply confidently is ex-
pected by the leaders of the Cleveland
gathering. A big influx of delegates
was expected today. Among these
was William Green, secretary of the'
United Mine Workers of America.
Many Socialists who will take part
in the national convention of that
party opening July 6 also were here
in the role of observers, although their
organization is represented as an of-
ficial unit of the conference.
Mqrris Hillquist a member of the
national committee of the Socialists,
also is a member of the national coin-
mittee of the Progressive confernce.
Communists will not have a part in
the conference here, if the sentiment
of the national committee is carried
out.
This committee yesterday agreed
that the credentials of all deleghtes
shall be critically inspected and that
Communists when known to be such,
shall not be seated. Each delegate,
it was said, will have to represent an
accredited organization.
Men's Ed Club Is
Representative
Figures from the directory of the
men's Educational Club show partial-
ly, at least, a significant distribution
of students taking education this sum-
mer. Classifications may be made
professionally, as to the positions held
by members during the school year,
and geographically, as to the places'
in which they are employed.
Of the 108 students members, 23
are principals and 36 are superintend-
ents. A few are students at Michigan,
but most of the rest are department
heads and instructors.
A total of 85 men will teach next
year in this state after spending the
summer at the University. Others
come from Illinois, North Dakota, Neb-
raska, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Ala-
bama, Wisconsin, Indiana, Ohio, Texas
and Louisana. The whole group is
thus fairly representative of educat-
ional institutions and practice over the

country.
Anotherfact that demonstrates the
further interest and usefulness of the
club is that 46 of its members come
from school systems in communities
of less than 500 population, while 60
teach in larger places, including Chi-
cago and Detroit.
Faculty members numbering 23 are
listed as members.
1 -9

Individual And
CommunityHave
Responsibilities
In an interview, Monday, Miss Mar-
jorie Delavan, the Director of the Bur-
eau of Education for the Michigan De-
partment of Public Health, who is giv-
ing five Health lectures on Monday,
Tuesday, and Thursday of this week,
and on Wednesday and Thursday of
next, at four o'clock in the West Am-
phitheater of the Medical building,
emphasized the need of health public-
ity. It is the adult, according to Miss
Delavan, who is hard to educate in
health habits. The average man is of
ten very ignorant and has a number of
wild theories and superstitions about
diseases and their cures. It is just
this popular ignorance that the Public
Health workers are trying to fight.
They are doing it largely through pub-
licity, "safe, sane and reliable publi-
city." The newspapers, the slogans,
the lecture platform, all help to put
across the idea of Public Health.
Both the individual and the com-
munity have a definite responsibility
and it is the job of the Health worker
to reach thenr by every legitimate
means.
Miss Delavan is taking up principles
of publicity in her lectures. She con-
siders adult instruction as a selling
proposition, based on the psychology
of salesmanship and advertising. By
reaching the individual, she believes
we can get multiplied action, result-
ing in healthier communities through-
out the country.
The movement for public health has
been going on for about fifty years.
Health publicity is, however, a very
recent organization, dating about three
years back. However, it is growing
very rapidly and offers a fascinating
new field of work. Health nurses are
now doing the largest share of it, but
it offers great opportunities along
other lines, pamphleteering, lecturing,
and field work.
Dr. H. E. Kleinschmidt, the head of
the Toledo Public Health Service, will
talk on graphic aids in lecturing, onl
next Monday and Tuesday.1
This course of lectures is of es-
pecial value for public health nurses
and doctors.
LINCOLN CASUELL WILL
IMPERSONATE LINCOLN
Abraham Lincoln will be personified
by his namesake, Lincoln H. Caswell,
in an entertainment given under the
auspices of the public speaking de-i
partment on July Interpretation andi
impersonation of the president will be
given in costume.
Mr. Caswel's life has been one of1
continuous admiration and study ofi
the life and character of Abraham1
Lincoln. His father, also an ardent
admirer of the martyred president,
gave him the name of Lincoln when,
he was a few days old. These circum-
stances have culminated in Mr. Cas-
well's purpose to portray the prin-
ciples and ideals of Lincoln as he has
conceived them after a lifetime spent
in research and effort to discover and
reveal the actual Lincoln.
In writing the monologue Mr. Cas-
well has chosen all his characters
from the actual history of that period
and the language used in the imper-
sonation is for the most part Lincoln's
own. It is given in three acts as fol-
lows: The first act brings back the
summer of 1862 in Lincoln's office at
the White House, where the Presi-

dent is receiving! visitors and holding
interviews. In the second act you
are introduced to Lincoln's famous
War Cabinet, at the time of the sign-
ign of the Emancipation Proclamation.
The third act is laid amid the discour-
aging conditions of the summer of
1864, two years later.
Paris, July 3.-A great crowd gath-
ered to meet Ras Taffari, the Prince of
Ethiopia on his recent arrival in Paris
because of a rumor that the prince
would be accompanied by 15 or 20
jungle animals. The only animal he
had, however, was a docile bulldog.
Bombay, July 3.-A many-colored
bird that leaves its eggs suspended
from the boughs of trees was discov-
ered by a party of English scientists
that returned here recently from the
heart of India.
Mexico has a freight car shortage.

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HUSSEY SPEAgKS ONi
NIAGARA__HISTORYI
Traces Development of Falls From
Glacial Ages; Gives Age At
22,000 Years
LECTURE PRELIMINARY
TO EXCURSION JULY 11
Continuing the summer lecture ser-
ies, Mr. Russell C. Hussey, instructor
in the Geology department lectured on
"Niagara Falls and its History" yes-
terday afternoon. This lecture was
intended to serve as a preliminary
to the excursion which is to be taken
there next week.
Mr. Hussey traced the development
of Niagara falls through the periods
of the glaciers. which covered North
America and the later receeding of
the glaciers due to the warming of
the climate and melting of the ice.
Interesting statistics concerning the
falls were given. Mr. Hussey said,
"Nigara falls is approximately 18,000
to 22,000 years old. The American
falls is 167 feet high. The crest is
1,000 feet long while the crest of the
horseshoe falls is 2,500 feet long.
Mr. Hussey told how the falls re-
cede each year due to the enormous
turmoil created by the water when it
strikes the bottom after dashing over
the cliff. The tumultuous waters,
beating against the soft lower layer of
stone wear it away and periodically
the top falls over, thus bringing the
falls back several feet. The average
recession of the falls is a foot a year
on the American side and four and one
half on the Canadian side. Eventual-
ly, according to Mr. Hussey, the falls
will disappear but it will be many
thousands of years before this will
occur.
Numerous spectacular slides accom-
panied the lecture and a number of
remarkable views of the falls were
shown.
Monterey, Calif., July 3.-The pilot
and observer of a seaplane attached
to the battleship Mississippi, who were
doused in the sea when their craft
went into a nose dive off the Del
Monte boathouse yesterday were res-
cued by the crew of a second plane.
England has 12 licensed women air
plane pilots.

WT I O
iWHA T'S GOING ON

'FOUR AME'NDMENTS
TO0 GOON BALLOT'

FRIDAY
National holiday-University
suspended.
MONDAY

DEMOCRATS NABLE
TO, PICK CANDIDATE
AFTER 2 BALLOTS
RALSTON TOTAL SWELLS TO 93
AS MISSOURI LEAVES
MCADOO
SMITH CONTINUES TO
HOLD 319 DELEGATES
MicAdoo's Total Now Only 412 1-2 Due
To Desertion of Missouri,
Mississippi
Madison Square Garden, July 3.-
Senator Ralston was given the soljid
Mississippi vote on the forty-ninth
ballot today and he began to pick up
scattered groups in other delegations.
The Mississippi switch cost McAdoo
20 votes.
On the fifty-first ballot McAdoo
lost 19 more, Smith gained 8 1-2, Dav-
is gained 3 1-2 and Ralston gained 5.
On teh fifty-second ballot Lowa re-
turned her 26 votes to McAdoo but
Missouri, with 36, desetred to Ralston,
cutting McAdoo's total to 412 1-2 and
and swelling Ralston's to 93.
Madison Square Garden, New York,
July 3.-(By AP)-Eclipsing all rec-
ords for prolonged balloting save one
the Democratic national convention
still was deadlocked as tightly as ever
today with no indications as to how
soon the break would come after mak-
ing 51 ballots.
McAdoo has dropped below the 500
mark again, due to the loss of Okla-
homa, which jumped to Senator Robin-
son. The Smith people said they were
laying back "letting McAdoo have his
run" and the McAdoo people said they
were waiting for all the Smith votes
to be brought out on the floor before
displaying their strategy further.
Dark Horses Still Dark
It looked very much as if both for-
ces were near their top strength.
Meanwhile, managers of candidates
who have been held in reserve as dark
horses to break the deadlock were
carefully considering the arrival of
the moment for them to make their
drives.
McAdoo's total went down on the
forty-third ballot, the first today, be-
cause Oklahoma with 20 votes jump-
ed out of his column and joined the
forces of Senator Robinson of Ark-
ansas.
The vote on that ballot, the first
of the day showed the leaders stand-
ing this way:
McAdoo, 483.4; Smith, 319.1; Davis
71; Robinson, 44; Ralston 31. This
showed a net loss of 19 for McAdoo,
carrying him below the 500 mark. It
was a gain of a half vote for Smith
a gain of 4 votes for Davis and the
gain of the whole state of Oklahoma,
20 votes, for Robinson.
Michigan divided, 15 for McAdoo and
15 for Smith.
ANN ARBOR5CELEBRTES
ITS 100THANNIVERSARY
Ann Arbor will celebrate the centen-
nial anniversary of its founding today
in and old time Fourth of July way
at. the fair grounds. The program
will open officially with a baseball
game at 10 o'clock at West Park, but

all of the rest of the activities will
take place on the fair grounds. A
fanmily basket picnic dinner, horse
races, a speech by H. Wirt Newkirk
and fireworks in the evening are feat-
ures on the program. The Centen-
nial Celebration committee of which
Willis Johnson is chairman has charge
of the event.
Leningrad, Russia, July 3.-It's
Leningrad-not Petrograd-and Soviet
government authorities intend to fine
anyone who presents a letter at the
postoffice addressed to Petrograd.
Washington, July 3.-The comp-
troller of the currency today issued a
call for the condition of all national
banks at the close of business on
Monday, June 30.
Buenos Aires, July 3.-Luis Firpo
is sailing today for New York on the
steamship American Legion to fulfill
his engagement to fight Harry Wills,

classes

Income Tax, Reapportlonnient,
ochial Closingr Prolibition

Par.
Ira

5:00-Heredity and Immigration. (I-
lustrated.) Prof. A. F. Schull, Na-
tural Science auditorium.
8:00-Public Health from the Inter-
national Viewpoint. Dr. Hugh S.
Cumming, surgeon general of the;
United States Public Health serv-
ice, Natural Science auditorium.
TUESDAY
5:00-Evolution in the Bible. Prof. W.
R. Humphreys, Natural Science au-
ditorium.
7:00-Choral Union rehearsal, School
of Music.
8:00-Recital- Lincoln - Character
Study and Impersonation, Mr. Lin-
coln Caswell of New York City, au-
ditorium of University hall. Admis-
sion will be charged.
WEDNESDAY
1:00-Excursion No. 4. Belle Isle and
the Detroit River. An afternoon's
outing at this famous playground;
botanical gardens, zoo, pavilions, la-
goons, and wooded drives. Ferry
to Belle Isle and return from Wood-
ward avenue. Trip ends at 6:30 p.
m.
5:00- Geographical Observations in
the Great Desert of Peru and Chile.
(Illustrated). Dr. P. E. James, Na-
tural Science auditorium.
16 ALL. "A"! REPORTED
BY ENGINEERING SCHOOL
The Engineering School reports 16
all "A" students for the second semes-
ter 1923-24.
These are as follows: Ludlow F.
Beach, '25E, Clark E. Center, '26E,
Charles C. Driscoll, '25E, Fred N.
Eaton, '26E, Karl II. Hachmuth, '26E,
Charles L. Hulswit, '24E, Louis R.
Kirscheman, '27E, Herbert Kuenzel,
'27E, Maurice Markowitz, '26E, Carl
C. Monrad, '27E, Harold W. Priebe,
'26E, William E. Renner, '26E, J. Rob-
ert F. Swanson, '24E, James L. Van
Vliet, '27E, Lyle A. Walsh, '26E, and
Clarence H. Young, '26E.

Go To Voters
STATE GRANGE BACKS
INCOME TAX CHANGES
Lansing, Mich., July 3.-The time
limit for filing petition for amend-
ments to the State oCnstitution to be
voted on at the general election in
November expired at noon today. Four
amendments will go on ballot. They
are the proposals for an income tax,
reapportionment, changes in the pro-
hibition enforcement law and to close
the parochial schools.
The income tax measure is the one
which has the backing of the State
Grange. It provides a 4 per cent
state tax on incomes in excess of
$5,000 in addition to the Federal tax
now collected. A. B. Cook, master of
the Grange, and other farm leaders
have been active in the campaign for
a state income tax for several months
and had little difficulty getting suffi-
cient names to put the measure on the
ballot. The proposal for a state in-
come tax has once been defeated by
the Michigan voters but those behind
the present bill believe it will pass
because of the provision starting the
income tax collections on a minimum
salary of $5,000. The previous bill
lacked this provision.
Dry Law An Issue
Voters will be asked to pass on the
Michigan "bone dry" prohibition law
for the first time since prohibition
was adopted in Michigan. This amend-
ment would modify the present law
to make it comply with whatever the
Federal law may mean. Petitions for
the amendment were filed by Robert
D. Wardell, of Detroit, state repres-
entative and secretary of the Michi-
gan branch of the National Associat-
ion Opposed to the Prohibiton Amend-
ment. Dry leaders say that, while the
measure on the face of it is apparent-
ly harmless, if adopted it would be
hailed by the "wets" as an indication
that the voters of Michigan are get-
ting tired of prohibition and desire a
change.
Eggs are now being sold for a cent
a piece in Russia.

I-

RAY FOR THE 4TH!

Grand, glorious, and noisy-
Enjoy yourselves, folks! But
don't forget to listen to the
rumpus on page three-Daily
Classifieds are most noisy and
effective for their size.
SEE
JIMMIE, JR.
THE AD TAKER
Press Bldg. Maynard St.

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