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July 03, 1924 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-07-03

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PAGE Two

THE, SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JULY 8, 1924

6 1

t

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SUMMER SESSION
Published every morning except Monday
during the summer session.
Member of the Associated Press. The As-
sociated Press is exclusively entitled to the
use for republication of all news dispatches
credited to it or not otherwise credited in
this paper and the local news published here-
in.
Entered at the postoffice, Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $rso.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building.
Communications, if signed as evidence of
good faith, will be published in The Summer
Daily at the discretion of the Editor. Un-
signed communications will receive no con-
sideration The signature may be omitted in
publication if desired by the writer. Th
Summer Daily does not necessarily endorse
the sentiments expressed in the communica-
tions.
TeEDITORIAL STAFF
Telephones 2414 and 176-M
MANAGING EDITOR
ROBERT G. RAMSAY
News Editor..........Robert S. Mansfield
Chairman of the Editorial Board......
...............Andrew E. Propper
City Editor. ...........Verena Moran
Night Editor.......... Frederick K. Sparrow
Telegraph Editor..........Leslie G. Bennets
Womens' Editor.............Gwendolyn Dew
STAFF MEMBERS
Louise Barley Marion Walker
Rosalea S paulding Leonard A. Keller
Virginia B ales Saul Hertz
Hans Wickland David Bramble
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER
CLAYTON C. PURDY
Advertising Manager.....Iliel M. Rockwell
Copywriting Manager......Noble D. Travis
Circulation Manager. Lauren C. Haight
Publication Manager.......C. Wells Christie
Account Manager..............Byron Parker
THURSDAY, JULY 3, 1924
Night Editor-FRED K. SPARROW
WITHIN THE SHADE
Masking itself behind a religious
fanaticism, drawing its support from
a religious intolerance comparable to
the rigors of the Spanish Inquisition,
clothing itself and all its acts in a
cloud of secrecy and obscurity, the
Ku Klux Klan is as guilty of the at-
tempt to force upon this country a
religion as is tne very act that the
hooded and oath bound band accuses
of every heinous crime known to man.
While seemingly religious in nature
the real issues of the Klan are polit-
ical, the ends they hope to attain
are political, but the means they take
of attaining this consummation is
through the religious prejudice of ig-
norant people.
The Klan, working as it does, sec-
retly and in the dark, is thus defying
one of the cardinal principles of lib-
erty and justice upon which this coun-
try was founded, the tradition of re-
ligious freedom and toleration brought
to us by our forefathers, taught by the
makers of the constitution, and preach-
ed throughout the years of our exist-
.ence as a nation. It may be true, that
in the troubled years following the
upset of the Civil War, in the trying
period of reconstruction when the so-
cial, and industrial and political in-
stitutions of this country were topsy
turvy and torn with the hatred engen-
dered of Civil War, such an agency
for law and order was necessary. To
day, there is no need for the Klan, and
it serves now only as an opportunity
for lawless bands, masking under the
name of the Ku Klux Klan, to prac-
tice all kinds of license, to vent per-
sonal spites, and through terrorizing,
through appealing to ignorant bias,
to wield a political power of signific-
ant magnitude.
When one of the great political par.

ties of the nation, spend their time
haggling over the question, it would
show the vast power of the invisible
empire, and the danger of its rapid
growth. While it pretends to be a
band, sworn to the best interests of
the country, of Americanism, and of
democracy, it bears every indication
of a group, duped by the silver ton-
gued oratory of their leaders, won by
the theatricalism of the flowing white
robes, the silent masses, the secrecy
and mystery, to do the bidding of its
leaders, and put them in places of the
mighty.
AIR MAIL SERVICE
At the time this is being written,
the transcontinental mail service will
have completed its first delivery, if all
goes well. No longer is the coast-to-
coast postal service a myth. It is
actually in operation. Who would
have dreamed ten-or even five-years'
,go that a letter posted in New York
at 8 a. m. Tuesday could be deliver-
ed in San Francisco the next day?
Commercial avliation has at last
begun. Soon we can expect passeng-
er and express planes, as there is noc
limit to which this phase of transport-
ation can grow. It is up to the lead-
ers of commerce to recognize its prac-I
ticability.

tween the delivery of mail by rail
and airplane we can readily estimate,
but it is too early to even guess at the
unlimited saving of money the new
service will accomplish.
FOOLISH ENFORCEMENT
Small towns located on or near
main highways may well profit from
the experience of a New York village
which has just increased the speed
limit within its boundaries to thirty
miles an hour. Considering the fact
that most small towns insist that the
motorist passing through them must
slow down to ten or fifeen miles per
hour this step on the part of Cpolonie,
N. Y., may cause surprise.
Colonie, however, knew what it was
doing. In the past it had depended
on the fines collected from speeding
motorists for a large part of its rev-
enue. For this reason its traffic of-
ficers were especially vigilant and per-
sons just breaking the speed limit
were arrested as eagerly as the reck-
less drivers. Colonie soon found that
motorists were avoiding her. Its
garages, supply stations and refresh-
ment shops felt a sharp falling off of
their trade. When it raised its speed
limit to thirty miles it found that the
traffic was increasing rapidly. .
The road between Ann Arbor and
Detroit passes through several towns
which indulge in the practice which
made motorists avoid Colonie. Driv-
ers of cars, especially experienced
drivers, like to maintain a steady
gait and rather than pass through a
town which arrests speeders because
it needs the revenue they take anoth-
er road which misses the town. It is
the duty of a driver to obey local
ordinances but when these ordinances
are made and enforced so that the
local treasury may profit he is usually
justified in giving the town the "cold
shoulder." Sensible speed laws which
are sensibly enforced have the ap-
probation of all good drivers.
JEDITORIAL COMMENTI
---- ---I
UNIVERSITIES AND THE CIRCUS
(The Science Magazine)
We have received the following
communication purporting to come
from the North American Circus
Owners' League:
Editor of Science:
We are about to select one of the
large eastern universities and to offer
to it a substantial subsidy for pro-
viding instruction for future circus
managers, artists and employees. We
wish to ascertain unofficially, through
your valued paper, if the rush of stu-
dents to take these courses would not
seriously interfere with the quieter
and less practical courses now given,
and thus possibly cause us some un-
sirable publicity.
Some universities are already train-
ing cooks salemens and plumbers, and
are teaching the laying of eggs, horse-
shoeing, etc. A careful study of their
present courses of instruction has led
our educational committee to believe
that most subjects of importance in
our profession could be given by the
existing departments, with a slight
adaptation of problems and termin-
ology.
Members of our committee have
personally attended the so-called
Spring-Day, Mud-Rush, and other sim-
ilar performances at some universi-
ties, and also various impromtu rough-
house affairs on the campuses and
down-town. They have satisfied
themselves that plentiful acceptable
circus material exists among the stu-
dent bodies of our typical universities

and colleges.*-
In offering our endowment to a un-
iversity, we shall make two condi-
tions: (a) That the requirements for
passing a course in our line shall be
considerably above the present edu-
cational standards, and (b)that no ex-
cuses for -absence shall be consid-
ered unless accompanied by at least
three separate medical certificates,
each signed by a doctor of a different
medical school, and all specifying an
ailment substantially in the same part
of the body.
For the training of managers, the
present courses in bookkeeping, posterj
design and boxing could be admirably
adapted. For training arena artists
some universities already have physic-
al directors, athletic coaches, horses,
bulls, etc., while for laboratory exer-:
cises the students themselves could in
turn take the part of wild animals.
A department of domestic science
could give excellent instruction in the
preparation of pink lemonade, redhotsj
and popcorn, while the departmentsf

would be the only additional equip-
ment needed to start with.
We shail be glad to have your im-
partial opinion in regard to the above I
proposal.
Yours truly,
HAGEN RING BARNLING,
Executive Secretary.
GERMANY MAKIN4 FRIENDS
(New York Times)
The decision of the French govern-
ment to permit the return to the occu-
.pied regions of the thousands of Ger-
mans depo-ted during the period of
passive resistance should strengthen
the desire of the German people to co-
operate in the peace settlement. And
their acceptance of supervision of
Germany's military establishment will
certainly impress the Allies favorably
To be sure, the Germans insist on
'three reservations, but the only im
portant one reads that the investiga-
tion shall not be begun for a month.
The excuse is that time is needed to
mollify public opinion in Germany.
Unfortunately, this looks rather like
one of the foolish and futile objections
which the Germans have so often put
forward to their own hurt.
When compared to the growing op-
position to those who are resisting the
government's plans to put through
the Dawes plan, this objection appears
trivial. Even the Nationalist extrem-
ists. acting under pressure said to
come primarily from the agrarians
and industrialists, are reported to be
in a more tractable mood. It is true
that this is in part due to a better
realization that unless the Dawes plan
is soon put in effect Germany may
again face a serious financial panic.
But the main thing is not so much the
reason for the greater reasonableness
on the part of the Germans as the
fact that it no wexists. There will be
delays and troubles enough in the
ordinary course of framing the neces-
sary legislation and carrying it out.
Boards and committees must be
chosen and a mass of technical work
undertaken before the Dawes plan can
actually be set in motion. This is a
vast labor, and every day of delay in-
creases the strain on Germany.
The German note to the Allies re-
iterates the claim that Germany is
disarmed, and adds thereto a forceful
declaration that she does not seek
awr. It points out that even if her
intentions were warlike she could do
nothing, because she lacks material
and supplies. These are all points
which must be established before the
world by other than German authori-
ties. The intemperate talk of the
Ludendorffs and Tirpitzes has perhaps
unjustly increased the profound ris-
trust which naturally followed the
war. The day when it can be defi-
nitely shown that their sentiments are
not those of the German people at
large, and there there is no secret mili-
tary preporedness in progress, will
mark the beginning of that mental
disarmament in Europe which is
needed as a preliminary to true peace.
0/VV11A/NN/V !

venture as a presidential contest, is
bound to reveal certain traits of na-
tional character in the way that it is
1nmanaged."
He goes on to say, "This is not a
'bad' Republican Administration which
finishes its four-year term in 1924;
in the councils of the Democratic par-
ty it is the 'worst' administration in
the history of the country. This is
not a 'good' moment to pick a candi-
date like Mr. Coolidge; for the Re-
publicans it is a 'critical' moment in
the affairs of man. Campaigns are
fought with what discrimination can
be squeezed from words like 'gravest,'
'gradest,' truest,' 'hardest,' 'dryest,'
'finest.' Issues are always 'fundament-
al.' Party wastes are 'bacchanalian,'

candidates are 'statuesque.' If the day
comes when the voter is not offered
a chance once more to choose between
'a second Lincoln' and 'the greatest
Democrat since Andrew Jackson left
the scene,' then America is not our
name." Americans dp seem to have
a great relish for superlatives.
Just as soon as we forget that "Yes,
we have no Bananas" ever existed, we
learn that it has reached Germany and
that their hats, stockings, bathing
suits, dresses, and shoes are banana-
colored. With cross-word puzzles our
latest fad, are we to expect people to
map out problems on the tile of bath-
room floors?
Try Classified ads for big Results.

DAILY TRYOUTS
Students registered in the
Sumiimer Session of the Univer-
sity who wish to work on the
Summer Michigan Daily editorial
staff are asked to call Ramsay at
2040 or Mansfield at 396, or to
come to the Press Building on
Maynard Street

1
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Rane's Quality Shoppe
WRITMORE LAKE
SPECIAL STEAK DINNERS
Reasonable prices
Lunches Ice Cream
Phone 18

'1ais

c

,0%#%^

%^1

TRY
Failings' Cool Dining
Rooms
714 MONROE STREET
One block south of Campus,
near State St.
Wonderful Home-Cooked Food for
the Lowest Price
Bring Your Friends and Have
a Table Reserved
Seeing is Believing"

"r

i

DANCING THIS WEEK
JIM BURKE'S PAVILION
WHITMORE LAKE
Wednesday, Thursday. Friday and
Saturday Nights
A GOOD SIX-PIECE DANCE ORCHESTRA

.1

'a.

41

DRUGS

KODAKS

Calkins-Fletcher
Drug Company
3 Dependable Stores
For your lunch try
one of our
Malted Milks
Delicious and
nourishing
Calkins-Fletcher
Drug Company
Corner E. and S. University Ave.
Corner S. State and Packard
324 S. State Street

OPENING OF
MacDONALD'S INN
WHITMORE LAKE
Special Chicken Dinner July 4
For Reservations Phone 30, Whitmore Lake
Parties a Specialty

t

I

Ii

I

LIGHT
LUNCHES

COOL
DRINKS

709 North University

CANDY

SODA WATER

CHOICE
CANDIES

CANOE
LUNCHES

v~ -

E F.

i

I

LAAA I&Al kAL& A LI -

!

U A,&

GLEANINGS

E

AXV
To Get

Vay
Ahead

10

W

TIN CAN BANKS
It is almost unbelievable, but some
folks still hide their coin in tomato
cans, gardens, and old socks. In these
days of air mail service, radio, and
other aidssto efficiency, it may sound
absurd to say that many people today
whose convictions are not the result
of scientific and greative thought but
rather of conventional reactions and
traditional knowledge that have been
handed down by previous generations
who lived in far other conditions than
the present. But that such an old,
outworn superstition as the fear of
banks should still survive is hard to
believe. Yet, once in a while, some-
thing turns up in the news of the
day to prove that such individuals
still exist.
There is no more sound institution
today than the modern bank. There
is risk in everything but the risk of
the modern bank is almost negligible,
it has reached the vanishing point. A
savings bank gives you something for
your money; the tin can or the hole in
the garden does not.
AN AMERICAN TRAIT-SUPERLA.
j ~TITS
Americans are prone to thing in su-
perlatives. Perhaps it is only a re-
fiection of their keen enjoyment in1

I

Honesty may be the BEST policy, but the SAFEST policy to insure
your future financial independence is a comprehensive savings plan. System-
atic saving by means of a membership in the MICHIGAN MUTUAL
SAVINGS ASSOCIATION is a definite step in this direction. A safe con-
servative investment which pays 7 per cent dividends and is secured by the
best real estate in the City of Ann Arbor is what we have to offer. BUT
a few memberships remain in our books. The number of investment-wise
business men of this community who are members of this association testifies
strongly as to the safety and solidity of our organization. Come into the
office and talk it over or have our representative call.
MICHIGAN

MUTUAL

SAVINGS

ASSOCIATION

Phone 3571-M

315 E. Washington

of oratory and psychology could teach life; but it may be noted that gener-
the proper way of calling attention to ally with an American, a thing is not
such delicicies. The departments of just "bad," it is the "worst" or the
chemistry, anatomy and law could "best." "It is probably true," writes
give training in the scientific prenara- Charles Merz in the Century magazine,
tion of freaks for the side shows. "that any affair which summons a
An assistant professor of clownery, whole nation to take a hand together,

"Under State Supervision"

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The difference in time saved be. a three-legged calf and a steam piano whether for a holiday or for such a

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