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July 03, 1924 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-07-03

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THE WEATHER
FAIR AND WARMER
TODAY

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XV. No. 12

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JULY 3, 1924

PRICE FIVE CENTS

SECONO CHOICE IS
THORN IN SIDE OF
PROGRESSIVE PARTY
COMMITTEE SEES LAF0LI: i:TTE
LIKELY NOMINEE AT
CONVENTION
LARGE NUMBER IN RACE
FOR VICE PRESIDENC
Brotherhood President And M. E.
Bishop Are Among
Candidates
Cleveland, O., July '2.-Final plans
for the Conference for Progessive Pol-
itical Action here July 4 were discuss-
ed by the national committee at its
first session in Cleveland today. The
,credentials committee also was ex-
pected to meet.
With the nomination of Senator
Robert M. LaFollette virtually a cer-
tainty the committee was expected to
discuss vice presidential possibilities,
this question apparently being the on-
ly important one not decided.
Bishop Francis M. McConnell of
Methodist church, chairman of the
inter-church world committee; D. B.
Robinson, president of the Brother-
hood of Locomotive Firemen and En-
ginemen and virtually ,all of the Pro-
gressive bloc of senators have been
mentioned, Arthur E. Holder, execu-
tive secretary of the conference said.
A revision of the national committee
announced by Mr. Holder adds an
equal number of women. Its mem-
bership includes Miss Mabel Buel of
the Michigan State grange.
Delegates to the Socialist conven-
tion here July 5 and 6, will watch the
conference's proceedings in a body,
it was learned today, and on their im-
pressions will depend in large part
whether the Socialist party will put
a ticket in the field.
Will Prejent Petition
Washington, July , 2.-Tentative
agreement has been reached by per-
sons who have been urging Senator
LaFollette of Wisconsin to run for
president to present to him, probably
this week a petition which they assert
carries hundreds of thousands of
signatures.
"A LaFollette for president com-
mittee," located in Chicago, has charge
of the petition and W. T. Raleigh pro-
bably will make the presentation in
Washington.
Senator LaFollette is expected to
make a statement to the committee de-
fining his position. The committee
will have some association with the
Cleveland convention which meets
July 4 and which is expected to nom-
inate the Wisconsin senator.
ITRIT UOCHESTRA
TO PLAY AT OPENING
Jean Goldkett's orchestra, well-
known musical organization from De-I
troit, will feature the opening nights
of the new Lake House pavilion at
Whitmore lake. Tomorrow and Sat-
urday Goldkett's will remain at the
pavilion. The new dance building is
unique in that it has a balcony which
extends over the water and upon
which couples may dance. Admission

will be $1.00 and tax extra for the
opening nights.
Designed Like a real airplane, a
three-wheeled coaster that is said to
give children many of the thrills of
a genuine flier, has been invented by
a former aviation instructor.
Poetry making in Russia is said to
be unionized under the Soviet regime.
OLE SHERLOCK
hisself is "non est" when
it comes to locating lost
whosits and doodabs. The
real detective is the Daily
Classified Service. Try
it for all your wants and
troubles.

Harvard A lumn us,
c-.Bishop, Leader In
Albania Republic
'! s
Albania, which won its independ-
ence in 1920 after centuries of dom-
ination by Turkey, is now setting up
a republic, with Bishop Fan S. Noli,
of the Albanian church, former Har-
vard student, taking a leading part.

ib

UNIVERSITY WILL
HAVE GOLF COURSE
Forty Acres Of Land South of Ferry
Field Acquired: Work Begins On
Greens and Fairwaye
SMEMBERSHIP OPEN TO ALL;
LIMITED TO 250 PLAYERS
Ann Arbor is to have a new golf

PRESS CLUB PLANS
CONVENTION HERE
Journalists Will Meet Here Novemiber
20 to 23 In Sixth Annual
Couention
ABBOT, AND SWOPE OF WORLD
WILL BE AMONG SPEAKERS
The University Press Club of Michi-
gan, membership of which includes
newspaper men of the state, will hold
its sixth annual convention at Ann Ar-
boir under the auspices of the Univer-
sity on November 20, 21 and 22. The
program is now being formulated and
will include among its speakers Willis
J. Abbot, editor of the Christian Sci-
ence Monitor; Herbert B. Swope, ex-
ecutive editor of the New York World,
and others. It is expected that rep-
resentatives of the American Society
of Newspaper Editors will also be
present.
The Press Club is wholly profession-
al in its objects and the activities of
the convention will be directed sole-
ly toward the improvement of journal-
ism and not toward the financial or
administrative side of newspaper or-
ganization. Its membership includes
more than 250 journalists of the state.
The president is A. L. Miller, editor of
the News-Enquirer of Battle Creek;
the vice-president is Arthur H. Van-
denberg, editor of the Grand Rapids
Herald; the secretary-treasurer is J.
L. Drumm, professor of journalism,
University of Michigan.
ENTRANTS FOR SUMMER
TENNIS CONTEST SLOW
Entrants in the summer tenni
tournament whih is being sponsored
by the Athletic association are sign-
ing up more slowly this year than
they formerly have done. The tourn-
ament is open to all summer school
students and some interesting compe-
tition is expected. Drawing for
matches will be held July 9 and every
student interested is asked to leave
his name at George Moe's Sport Shop
on North University avenue before
that date.
COLLEGE TENNIS TITLE
GOES INTO NEW HNS(
One new champion was crowmd I
in intercollegiate sports as the re-
sult of the college tennis champion-
ships recently reld at Philadelphia.
Ie is Wallace Scott of the University
of Washington, who won over Arnold3
Jones, last year's champion, in the7
finals of the singles event. White andE
Thalheimer of the University of Tex-
as, were successful in defending their<
doubles title won last year.

course, which will be situated just
south of Ferry Field and adjoining the
property of the Ann Arbor Golf and
Outing Club at its south-east corner.
Forty acres of rolling land have been
acquired there by twvo University grad-
uates, H. E. Hastings and 0. H. Clark,
and work will begin at once upon the
fairways andgreens. Since part of
the land was at one time a golf course
and since all of it is now covered
with blue grass, it is expected that
the course will be playable by Septem-
ber 20. The necessary seeding is to
be done under the direction of C. A.
Harris, local seed merchant.
Membership in the club, which is to
be known as the University Golf Club,
will be open to the first comers, but
is limited to 250 players. Member-
ships will be issued on a yearly basis
at the rate of $30.00. Students may
enroll at the yearly rate or for $15.00
a semester. Membership blanks can
be obtained at George Moe's sport-
shop. Although the project was first
anounced yesterday in the Ann Arbor
Times-News, there has already been
a brisk demand for playing privileges,
and it is expected that the limit of
250 will soon be reached. Many reg-
ular students who play golf are now
in summer school, and have an oppor-
tunity to secure memberships early
for next year.
EDUCATION COURSES TO
STRESS DFMONSTRATION
Emphasis is being laid this sum
mer cm demonstration work in class-
wprk of the department feature class-
es in the School of Edcation. Sev-
eral courses listed in the general
ork of the department feature class-
es actually under instruction. After
the class hour a discussion is held
during which teachers, and especially
those having had practical exerience,
find it protfitable to ask questions
Courses in which the method is
used cover everything in the field of
high school subjects. Under natural
sciences, there are special courses in
methods in botany, zoology, physics
and chemistry. Languages in which
observation is stressed include French,
English, Latin, Spanish, and German.
Courses in methods in history and in
mathematics also are being offered.
Something similar is done in the
courses in coaching now being con-
ducted on Ferry field, except that the
students in that work demonstrate the
principles for an hour on the field
after every lecture.
No practice teaching has. been pos-
sible as yet during Summer sessions,
although such work will be undertak-
en probably next summer i the Uni
versity high school.
The general tendency in education
at present is toward demonstration
and criticism of fundamental teach-
ing problems. To cover this side of
the work of the profession Mr. T. P.
Knapp, superintendent of Highland
Park schools, is giving a general
course on the principles of method.
MT, HOLYOKE CRAD EDS
PHYSICAL ED EPRTMENT
Miss Grace Rockwood, a graduate
of Mt. Holyoke College, is supervisor
of the women's branch of the Physi-
cal Education department for the sum-
mer. She is assisted by Miss Melden,
Everett, who was one of the instruct-
ors in this department during the past
year. Women students are urged to

avail themselves of all the facilities;
offered in Barbour gymnasium, and to
register for- the general courses in
Physical Education. Among the cours-
es in this department during the sum-
mer session are: horseback riding,
swimming, tennis, natural dancing,
games, and coaching of major games.,

MICHIGAN'S FALL
SCHEDUE HEAVY
Coach Little's Squad Will Play Six
Strong Conference Elevens
In 1924
WOLVERINES WILL DEDICATE
GIANT NEW ILLINOIS STADIUM
Michigan's grid schedule for 1924
is the most exacting in several years.
Besides the four conference teams
played last year, the Wolverines will
meet Illinois, undefeated in 1923, who
tied with Michigan for the champion-
ship. Northwestern will be the sixth
conference opponent for Coach Little's
squad. Miami univeristy and Michi-
gan Agricultural college complete the
list. Three of the games will dedi-
cate new stardia at East Lansing,
Urbana, and Minneapolis, making the
fall schedule of unusual importance.
The game with Illinois at Urbana
October 18 will be the greatest test
of a Michigan team in many years.
This contest will dedicate the new
$2,000,000 stadium, and will involve
the settling of the disputed supremacy
claims of followers of both teams as
a result of the tied championship of
last year. 80,000 spectators are ex-
pected to attend this game.
All of the conference teams played
will furnish strong opposition. Pre-
dictions as to the outcome of the sea-
son cannot be made with any degree
of certainty, as in previous years. One
thing only sems assured, that Michi-
gan faces in its 1924 schedule the sev-
erest test in many years.
The complete schedule follows in
detail:
Oct. 4--Miai university at Ann Ar-
bor.
Oct. 11-M. A. C. at East aLnsing. P
Oct. 18-Illinois at Urbana.
Oct. 25-Wisconsin at Ann Arbor.
Nov. 1-Minnesota at Minneapolis.
Nov. 8-Northwestern at Ann Arbor.c
Nov. 15-Ohio State at Columbus. c
Nov. 22--Iowa at Ann Arbor.
50 STUDENTS INSPECT
FORD MOTOR FACTORY
Fifty students inspected the Ford
Motor Company, Highland Park, yes-
terday afternoon on the third excur-
sion of the summer session. Under
special guides, the party was taken'
through' the tool room, motor assem-
bly, crank shaft machine room, and
finally through the huge power plant.
Production methods that have brought
unparalleled quantity output and mon-c
ey making eficiency were observed;t
and where necessary, explanations
were added, when the din of the plant
operations permitted.
At present the Ford plant is operat-
ing on a five day basis, most of thec
departments running on the three
eight hour shift, twenty-four hours per
day, schedule. The guide suggested
that Ford production, in some respects
was an accurate criterion of general
business conditions.
Dinner following the tour through'
the buildings was secured at the Maj-
estic building cafeteria on lower
Woodward avenue. At eight forty
five the excursion group arrived in
Ann Arbor.
There will be no excursion this com-
ing week end because of the Fourthc
of July, but Wednesday, July ninth,

Belle Isle will be visited.
8,141 GET DEGREES
SINCE 1921 CATALOGUE
Since the publication of the last Uni-
versity Alumni catalogue in 1921, 6,-
141 students have received degrees,
making a total of 42,541 degrees re-
ceived to date.I
Of this number, 1,823 degrees were
recived in 1921, 2,093 in 1922, and 2,-
225 in 1923, besides 35 honorary de-
grees which have been confered dur-
ing the last three years.
The 1921 catalogue contained the
names of 61,566 alumni of the Univer-
sity. The next edition will appear in
1931, containing totals of the number'
of living and dead alumni to date, andr
records of all degrees conferred.

Brother Of Fascist
Chief Wields Big
Stick In Italy, Too

Arnoldo Mussolini
More than one Mussolini is promin-
ent in the political affairs of Italy.
As director of the "Popolo D'Italia,"
a leading newspaper, Commander Ar-
nolodo Mussolini, brother of the Fas-
cist premier, wields a powerful polit-
ical stick in Milan.
1050 WOMEN HERE
IN SUMMVERSESSION
Lit School Comes First With 505:
Graduate School Second
Education Third
MISS HELEN BISHOP, DEAN
OF WOMEN FOR SUMMER WORK
Enrollment in the summer session
of the University has reached the total
of 3,109 students, 1,050 of which are
women, according to figures compiled
by Miss Helen C. Bishop, in the office
of the Dean of women.
Five hundred and five students out
of the 1,131 registered in the College
of Literature, science and the arts are
women and 15 women are included in
the enrollment of 419 students in the
Engineering school. -
Out of the 293 students studying
in the Medical school, 24 are women
while the schol of pharmacy has reg-
istered three women in its total of 15
students. The Law school has a total
of 150 students. Two women are
studying law in the school this sum--
mer.
Two hundred and fifty-five stu-
dents out of of the total of 678 regis-
tered in the Graduate schol are wo-
men and the school of education has
246 women out of the total enrollment
of 423 students.
These figures show that the Literary
college has the largest proportion of
women. The Graduate schol follows
second in line with 255 and the school
of education ranks third with an en-
rollment of 246 women.
MEDICAL SCHOOL SHOWS
INCREASED ENROLLMENT
Enrollment in the practitioners'
course offered by the Medical school
has now reached 20, the secretary's
office announced today. Six states are
represented. Michigan leads with 13,
Ohio has 3, and Wisconsin, Missouri,
New York, and Kentucky have one
each.
The course is offered by the de-
partment of internal medicine under
the direction of Professors Warfield,
Newburgh and Wilson. General diag-
nosis, including ward rounds, is the
subject treated.
INTERCOLLEGIATE GOLF
CHAMP RETAIS TITLE
Dexter Cummings, Yale golfer, sue
cessfully defended his intercollegiate
championship when he defeated W. H.
Taft of Dartmouth, 6 and 5 in the fin-
als of the intercollegiate tournament
at Greenich, Conn., recently.

R

1MCADOO STILL IN
LEAD AS DELEGTES
CA"ST 40TH BALLT
DLEM. CONVENTION REELS UNDER
BOMBARDMENT ACCORDED
W. J. BRYAN
COMMONER'S STAND ON
MCADOO STIRS PARTY
Record of Balloting Climbs Toward
A New High
Mark
Madison Square Gardens, New York,
July 2.-(By AP)-A total for the
40 ballots are as follows; McAdoo,
505 1-2, Smith 317 1-2, Davis, W. V. 71,
Underwood, 38 1-2, Cox, 55, Glass, 25,
Ralston, 32; Robinson, 23, Ritchie, 18
1-2, Davis, Kansas, 3, Walsh, 1, Sauls-
bury, 6, Owen, 4, Jackson, 1. Stopped
voting. Total, 1007, 1-2.
Madison Square Gardens, New York,
July 2.-(By AP)-Still reeling under
the effect of the bombardment and
counter attack which swept the demo-
cratic national convention late this
afternoon when W. J. Bryan took the
platform for William G. McAdoo, and
was under a fire of questions regard-
ing McAdoo's connection with the oil
question and Tax refunds from the
government to corporations, the con-
vention assembled at S o'clock tonight
for the 39th ballot.
The effect of Bryan's move, and the
storm which accompanied it, was the
sole topic of discussion among teh
leaders when the convention assembl-
ed. Who had been benefited, and who
had been hurt were the great ques-
tions. There was an agreement on
all sides that if anything had been
necessary to solidify the Smith peo-
ple, it was Bryan's reference to the
necessity for a candidate whose pos-
ition was right on "the liquor ques-
tion". It was obvious that Bryan had
broke out on the floor of the conven-
tion a subject which the McAdoo peo-
ple had no relish for throwing into
open debate, the oil question and the
tax refund case.
The Ralston people were evidently
looking about to estimate how -their
candidate had fared under Bryan's
open attack.
Senator Walsh of Montana, a de-
clared supporter of McAdoo had given
way in the chair for the next session
to Senator Walsh of Massachusetts
a declared supporter of, Smith, so that
the way might be cleared from any em-
barrasment for clearing the galleries
of Smith's rooters if they became so
unruly as to stop the convention pro-
ceedings as they had done at the after-
noon sessionwhen they snowed Bryan
down under a cloudburst of howls,
cat calls and uncomplimentary re-
marks.
Slowly the record of ballots was
climbing toward the record made at
Baltimore and San Francisco where it
took 46 and 44 respectively to find
a nominee. If no nominee is chosen
tonight, the record will be in a fair
to be broken. At 8:15 Chairman
Walsh began gavelling for order; sil-
enced the band, waved delegates and
alternates to their seats, and shook a
hand at the galleries to keep in order
and announced that Mr. Fred II. Knu-
bell of the United Lutheran churches
would lead in prayer.

Hong Kong, July2.-Stuart MacLar-
en, British aviator, left here at 9:30
a. m. today for Foochow, on his
around-the-world flight.
WAT'S GOING O0N'
THURSDAY
4:00-Bible class,. Upper room, Lane
hall.
5:00-Niagara Falls and Its History.
(Illustrated). Mr. C. R Hussey, Na-
tural Science auditorium.
7:00-Choral Union rehearsal, School
of Music.
8:00-Educational motion pictures, Na.
tural Science auditorium.
FRIDAY
National holiday-University classes
suspended.

SEE
JIMMIE, JR.
THE AD TAKER

ynard St.

Varese Bldg.

May

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