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July 01, 1924 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1924-07-01

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PAGE TWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JULY 1, 1924

t t '

UI4g ftmwt?
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SUIMER SESSION
Published every morning except Monday
during the summer session.
Member of the Associated Press. The As-
sociated Press is exclusively entitled to the
use for republication of all news dispatches
credited to it or not otherwise credited in
this paper and the local news published here-
in.
Entered at the postoffice, Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $.5o.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building.
Coxmmunications, if signed as evidence of
goodfaith, will be published in The Summer
Daily at the discretion of the Editor. Un-
signed communications will receive no con-
sideration. The signature may be omitted in
publication if desired by the writer. The
Summer Daily does not necessarily endorse
the sentiments expressed in the communica-
tions.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephones 2414 and 176-M
MANAGING EDITOR
ROBERT G. RAMSAY
News Editor............Robert S. Mansfield
Chairman of the Editorial Board.... e
.................Andrew E. Propper
City Editor...................Verena Moran
Night Editor.............. John W. Conrad
Nightditor..........Frederick K. Sparrow
Telegraph Editor...........Leslie G. Bennets
Womens' Editor.............Gwendolyn Dew
STAFF MEMBERS
Margaret Wrentmore Francis O'Melia
Louise Barley Marion Walker
Rosale Sauding Leonard A, Keller
Virginia Baes Saul Hfertz
Hans Wickland David Bramble
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAER
CLAYTON C. P'URDY
Advertising Manager.......hiel M. Rockwell
Copywiting Manager.......Noble D. Travis
Circulation Manager.......Lauren C. Haight
Publication Manager........C. Wells Christie
Account Man-ager..............Byron Parker
TUESDAY, JULY 1, 1924
Night Editor-ROBT. G. RAMSAY
THE RED BUGABOO
The "Reds" are at it again! Or
so thinks the Dearborn Independent,
if one reads aright an editorial from
a recent issue:
"In dealing with the business of
bank roberry, American police au-
thorities may do well to consider
the experience of Russia. Previous
to the revolution in the country,
RED PROPAGANDA FINANCED
ITSELF BY ROBBERY. The party
adopted a regular policy of what
was called 'expropriation,' that is,
they violently confiscated wealth for
their political purposes. They did
not call it robbery; it was war
against society .. . Express trains
were held up, government funds
were stolen, banks were robbed, and
when very rarely the robbers were
captured, the loot was never found."
We are further enlightened as to
current history by the following state-
ment: "The most expert criminals in
the world, most of whom are now of-
ficials of Soviet Russia, were engaged
in this work of foraging on society
for the purpose of recruiting the rev-
olutionary treasury." Fortunately the
sphere of influence of the Deaborn In-
dependent is not of sufficient magni-
tude to include Russia, and members
of the Soviet cabinet are thereby saved
from twinges of conscience.
The editorial suggests that it would-
be well to have the police include the
possibility of these wide programs for
ckillful robbery in the United States
as a part of the operations of the
Treasury Department of the World
Revolution. "There work has all the
earmarks of a program," the Dear-
born Independent concludes.
It is our belief that the editorial
of the Dearborn Independent has all

the earmarks of propaganda. Fortun-
ately, people have more or less earn-
ed not to believe all they read; and
hence when editorials such as these
apyear, the "Red" bugaboo is recog-
nized as such and nothing more.
A WAR ON BUNK AND
DEMAGOGUES
"This is the end of the era of bunk,"
said William M. Butler just before his
efforts for the nomination of Presi-
dent Coolidge bore fruit in the Repub-
lican convention at Cleveland.
Such a statement cannot make the
general public very optimistic for
"bunk" is a hardy weed and difficult
to uuproot. But it shows, perhaps, the
new trend in politics. And it is a
trend that can be truly hailed with
pleasure. The end of the era of bunk
would be a long step toward the
political millennium. It cannot be
accomplished in one step for bunk is
conventional; it is expected in polit-
ics; and its presence is so habitual
that its absence alone would tend
to make in conspicuous.
Even more encouraging than the
statement of Mr. Butler, was the first
speech of Gen. Charles G. Dawes aft-
er he was nominated for Vice-Presi-'
dent.

running rife in the world and we,
here in the United States, are feeling
its devastating effects. All good Re-
publicans and all good Democrats
who put their country above their
party demand the beginning of an
era of common sense in public dis-
cussions. In the campaign which
is before me, and as a duty which
I owe not simply to a party, but to
the citizens of the United State, I1
pledge to adhere to the truth and to1
the common sense conclusions to]
be drawn therefrom. As to the1
demagogue on the stump, whatever
may be his party, I want it dis-
tinctly upnderstood that in the coin-
ing campaign I ask no quarter and
will give none."
The announcement of a war on bunk
and a crusade against demagogues
comes as a relief to those citizens
who have grown weary of the cheap
and fruitless era of the "hard-boil-
ed" politician. Truth can do more
than bunk has ever done. Indeed,
there is an old proverb to the effect
that "if men would once consider one
another reasonably, they would eith-
er reconcile their differences, or more
amicably maintain them."
TRAINING VIA IHUMILIATION
Young fellows leave their homes to
spend four years or more at college
and expect to return to their mothers'
loving arms, well rounded and world-
ly men. They spend half of their time
at a university like Michigan before
finding out just what an education
means, and the latter portion of their
sojourn is then necessarily occupied
with the task of finding out how to
make the best of that education.
There are many worn-out reasons
given for the failure of colleges to
accomplish its purpose but one in
particular is responsible for more in-
nocent disappointments than any oth-
er. Self-assurance, confidence in word
and act, are uncultivated in almost
every boy who comes to college, Even
after several years of academic train-
ing many lack that self-reliance which
Emerson puts as a keynote to suc-
cess.
It is not a difficult thing to impress
the student with the value of this
trait. In fact with the present sys-
tem of class recitations he would be
forced to cultivate his confidence if
failure in quizzes was made sufficient-
ly humiliating. We do not want to
force students to their work but they
could none the less be made to feel
their lack of self-reliance through
embarrassment.
The man who goes out into the
world, knowing what he can do and
confident in himself through all the
trials to which he is subjected has the
advantage on the uncertain fellow
who never quite catches up to him.
This year the public has the pleas-
ure of contrasting three political con-
ventions of considerable magnitude.
The Republican national convention
at Cleveland; the Democratic national
convention at New York; and the so-
called "radical" convention at Cleve-
land. It is interesting to note how
three different groups of citizens with
varying ideas as to politics and gov-
ernment will handle the same nation-
al problems.
To a woman is attributed the first
remark showing any originality and
sense that was made at the Democrat-
ic convention to date. "Wall street
is as much a part of America as Main
street," declared Mrs. Dr, Kate Wal-
Ier Barrett, of Virginia. And the del-
egates rose to a man to voice their
approval.

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THE NEW BROOM OF EUROPE}
According to reports, a new era of
housecleaning is due in Europe and,
the latest, self-elected weilders of the
political broom and dustpan are to be
Messrs. MacDonald in Great Britian
and Herriot in France. The proclaim-
ed purpose is that of doing away with
the rubbish of the old governments,!
and of solving the problems of their
countries on the new and enlightened
basis of Socialism. Hercules attempt-
ed no more ditficult task when he un-
dertook to cleanse the Augean stables
in a single day. It will be remember-
ed that the redoubtable hero of mytho-
logy accomplished his purpose by
turning the river of Alpheus andl
Peneus from their regular courses;
and it remains to be seen whether or'
not Messrs. MacDonald and Herriot
can discover on this earth any two
rivers, figuratively speaking, of suf-
ficient volume and strength with
which to accomplish such re-direc-
tion.
This allied convention is scheduled
to meet in London, July 1, for a dis-
cussion of the most satisfactory means
of putting the Dawes scheme of rep-
arations into effect. And now one of
the first things that Messrs. MacDon-
ald and Herriot do is to issue a cry
to the United States for help. This
country ought to express sincere ap-
preciation of the invitation, but we
can see no very convincing reasons
why it should accept. In the first
place, Mr. MacDonald himself termed
this conference the "inter-Allied con-
ference." But the United States is not
one of the Allies. Again, Mr. Mac-
Donald before the House of Commons,
spoke of the coming conference as an
attempt to coordinate the terms of the
Treaty of Versailles with those of the
Dawes report. But the United States
is not a party to the Versailles Treaty
and therefore cannot be expected to
be a party in interpreting it. And
lastly, the United States has furnish-
ed, in the Dawes report, what the
Powers themselves concede to be the
most valuable contribution to the
settlement of Europe's chief problems.
Are we expected now to administer
and enforce it? That seems to be un-
called for.
Apparently Washington has decided
upon a compromise between being tot-
ally absent and wholly present. The
' American Ambassador at the Court of
St. James, Frank B. Kellogg, has been
instructed to participate in the coming
conference, "for the purpose of deal-
ing with such matters as affect the
the interests of the United States and
otherwise for the purposes of inform-
ation." That, certainly, is a large or-
der; and perhaps it is better thus, for
universial good will is highly import-
ant.
EQUAL RIGHTS FOR WOMEN
The National Women's Party again
creeps into the limelight at the Dem-
ocratic national convention. The
Party seeks what it chooses to call
"equal rights for women." It de-
manded this from the Republicans
(and got it) and now the Democrats
follow suit.

A bland and similing stranger eas-
es up to him and whispers, "What's
the matter, old man In a jam on pro-
hibition?"
The defendant nods. The stranger
consolingly places an arm around his
newly found friend and says, "Is that
all? Don't let that worry you. May-
be I can fix it up with my friend the
judge over there," pointing to a man
about to enter a private office.
"Do you know him?" asks the de-
lighted bootlegger, his face lighting
up.
"Do I know him?" the lind strang-
,er laughs. "Come with me,"
They go into the room and approach
the judge deferntially. "Hello, Jim,"
growls the judge shaking hands.
Friend of mine," says Jim, point-
ing to the trembling and excited vic-
tim. "Friend of mine and a good
scout. Coming up before you. Can't
you let it slide along somehow"
The judge professes great indigna-
tion but the two men retire to a
corner and converse earnestly for five
minutes. The judge leaves and Jim
returns to his friend.
"He doesn't like to do it but he
thinks you're a friend of mine and
he'll fix it up for $300."
The money is paid and Jim disap-
pears. The case is called. But an-'
other judge, the real judge, sits at the
bench. And the bootlegger goes to
jail for ten days.
Moral: Put not thy trust in smiles.
It isn't really the Ku Klux Klan, the
Le. -cwt of Nations, and other prob-
lems that are causing trouble; its
what men think about them that
creates all the noise.
We are all Adam's children, but silk
makes the differences.
All summer long you will be
able to enjoy the wholesome
food and restful quiet
at
TUTTLE'S
LUNCH ROOM
Phone 150
3,S iL,-ynard St. South of Maj

There is nothing new under the
sun,-not even "The New Woman."
In "Colonial Women of Affairs," re-
cently published by Houghton Mifflin
Company, Elizabeth Anthony Dexter
has uncovered a mine of fascinating
and authentic information. That
ladies engaged in trade, carried on
horseshoeing, soapmaking, and even
concocted the fore-runners of our mod-
ern home brew and patent medicine,
she has proved conclusively. "Per-
haps," Miss Dexter writes, "one reason
why "the new woman" has found less
resistance to her activities in the
United States than elsewhere is be-

cause of this tradition of work, and the
respect and the self-respect won quiet-
ly and unconsciously by these women
of an earlier generation. The women
of Puritan days were no more all the
"Pilgrim Mother" of poem and statue,
or the colonial dame of fancy-dress
ball than we today are all missionary
heroine or fashionplate model."
IRVING WARMOLYSD .S. C
Chiropodist and
Orthopedist
707 N. University. Phone 2662

Books And Writers

GROOME'S BATHING BEACH
Whitmore Lake
Refreshments Of All Kinds
DANCING THIS WEEK
JIM BURKE'S PAVILION
WHITMORE LAKE
Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and
Saturday Nights
A GOOD SIX-PIECE DANCE ORCHESTRA
!f11111Ulllll lll ll11Illilll lll llll1l1l lll l 1111111111111111111111111111!=
Big Reductions
SOn
Pictures, Vases and
Art Goods
Photo-craft Shop
Opposite Post Office 2 Nickles Arcade
. °t fl1iflfflfltllllll!l11fl11111 11111111D1[1111111111111111111

Self spacing 10-inch Positive line Paper
carrnage carriage Straight line indicator bail
return visibility
Automatic Twirlers on
12-yard \ both ends
ribbon of carriage
Stenciling Ball bearing
devicew e _shift
Margin
release
on keyboard
Shift lock Back spacer
on keyboard on kyboard

t
t
t
x
t
t

l CAMPUS OPINION

I

I

THANKS! ThAT HELPS !
To the Editor:
I hope that other grey-headed and
bald-headed members of the SummerI
school student body are getting as re-
freshing a "kick" from reading the
editorial page of The Summer Mich-
igan Daily as the writer. The virility
of the architects of this page in ex-
pressing opinion without fear or fav-
or is heartening to one who has long
made opinion subservient to diplom-I
acy. The Michigan Daily brings back
by undergraduate days with greater
vividness than I thought possible.
Were it not for occasional twinges of
rheumatism and other reminders of
decrepitude I would feel like leading
a class rush or other equally stren-
uous college function. Seriously, aft-
er having been absent from my native
state since "befo' de wah," I find that
the U. of M. is right here she belongs
-in the front line of educational ef-
fort and accomplishment. I am sure
The Michigan Daily is an important
agency in keeping up the morale of
the University to this end.1
M'4 } RM.

Equal rights for women? What are
the women after? What is it that
they desire which has not been grant-
ed them? They have the ballot. They
have invaded every business and pro-
fession. There are women lawyers
and some of them are better than
the men. There are women doctors,
women farmers, women who run taxi
cabs, women who serve on police
forces; exclusively male sanctuaries
in business and politics have disap-
peared. Equal rights for women?
What in the world is there that the
women think they have not? What-
ever it is, we predict they will soon
get it-or take it.
HARD LIFE
Verily the life of the bootlegger is
a trying one. First he runs the risk
of being arrested for his illicit traf-
fic; then he is swindled in the very
halls of justice. Efforts have been
made recently to stop the practices of
bond sharks and men who represent
themselves as "fixers" or misrepres-
ent themsleves as attorneys. But the
practice of muleting distressed viol-
ators of the Volstead act goes on.
Scene-a hall of justice in a big
city. Time-almost any day. A de-
jected bootlegger appears on the stage,
ready to enter a plea. He doesn't
mind the fine, but he hates to think
of going to jail. Gloomily he loiters
until his case is called.

Standard Office
Keyboard

No other t ewriter
has all these feawures

r

STUDY the diagram above. No
typewriter, large or small, at
any price, has all of the refinements
of the new Corona Four with sta dard
office keyboard.
Come in and see it. Notice its simple,
pturdy construction-its many con-
ve~niences.
Touch a key lightly-feel the swift,
easy action-the superlatively light
touch.
Now feed a sheet of paper into the

carriage and write. See what beautiful
work it does and how quietly it oper-
ates
Then try a hard test-12 carbons at
once. Look at the last carbon-clear
and black. Do you know any type-
writer that will beat it?
It's an office typewriter-and a port-.
able typewriter. You will want one
for personal use-you will want one or
more in your office. Phone your reser-
vation now-our supply is extremely
limited.

CORONA FOUR

O. D. MORRILL,

Dealer,

17 Nickels' Arcade,
THE TYPEWRITER AND STATIONERY STORE.

"An orgy of demagogism has beenI

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