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July 01, 1924 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-07-01

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THE WEATHER
FAIR
TODAY

C, 4 r

ix tm e :

Ian

Datli

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XV. No. 10 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JULY 1 1924 PRICE FIVE CENTS

v r

OHIO STORM LEAVES
NINETY FOUR KNOW
DEAD; TOLL RISES
PROPERTY DAMAGE AMOUNTS TO
$30,000,000; HUNDREDS IN-
JURED)
LORAIN DISTRICT IS
HARDEST HIT AREA
Windstorm Sweeps From Sa-u-sky
Along Coast of Lake Erie to
Cleveland
Cleveland, June 30.-(By AP)-
Ninety-four persons were known to be
dead in Ohio today as a result of Sat-
urday's severe wind, rain and electric-
al storm which swept the coast of Lake
Erie from Sandusky to Lorain, wreck-
ing a large portion of Lorain and
parts of Sandusky.
Although the loss of life was not as
great as at first believed, relief work-
ers said today that the list of dead may
grow. Several hundred persons were
reported injured, several scores of
them seriously and the property dam-
age was estimated at more than
$30,000,000.
Tabulation of Damage
Following is a tabluation of the
Ohio storm damage as compiled by
The Associated Press:
Lorain-70 dead, several hundred
probably injured and property damage
estimated at more than $25,000,00.
Sandusky-6 dead, about 100 injur-
ed and property damage estimated at
more than $1,500,000.
Cleveland-7 dead and small proper-
ty loss.
Mantu-3 dead.
Akron-i dead and property dam-
age estimatedatdbetween $500,000 and
$1,000,000.
French Creek-3 killed and 12
houses demolished or badly damaged.
Warren-1 dead and damage esti-
mated at $250,000.
Near Weymouth-2 children drown-
ed.
Youngstown- dead.
Salem-1 dead.
Alliance-No casualties but 100 re-
ported rescued by police from flodded
homes.
Elyria-Virtually no damage.
Cedar Point-6 cottages blown
down; no casualties.
Vermillion-Small damage from
heavy rain but no casualties.
Norwalk-Creek valley residents
make preparation to leave their homes
as waterworks reservoir weakens
from heavy rains.
GRIFFN WILL DISCUSS
REPARTON PAYMENTS
Prof. Clare E. Griffin of the econ-
omics department will lecture at 5 o'-
clock this afternoon in Natural Sci-
ence auditorium on "The Economics of
International Payments, With Special
Reference to Reparations."
9ihe lecture wPillheal trimaiy
with the methods of transfer of funds
from Germany to other countries and
the effect of this transfer on the
countries involved. Professor Griffin
will explain how the capacity of Ger-
many to pay the oher counrties is as
much limtied by her ability to raise
the funds. He will also show how the

question of German reparations is not
only a question of taxation within
Germany but also a question of inter-
national trade.
He also hopes to touch, on the ques-
tion of the European debts to the
United States, the methods of pay-'
ment adopted by the different coun-
tries, and how the payments will ef-
fect our country.
POTENT STUFF
For the small sum of 10c per line
we can give you some real effect-
ive Daily Classified Remedy (Pat.
App. For.) If taken for three
days, the price is 9c per line.
Drop up and
SEE
JIMMIE, JR.
THE AD TAKER
Press Bldg. Maynard St.

Boosted For Laureate

,

Edwin Markham

An official laureate of America, and
Edwin Markham as poet laureate are
the two pjects of an organization
formered by prominent persons from
various parts of the country. The
movement had its inception in Miami,
Florida when the California poet,
author of "The Man of the Hoe" spoke
there.
II

I

DETROIT CLUB
GIVES INVITATION
Associated MichiganA lumni Clubs to
Hold Triennial Meeting in
June

PRES. RUMNEY ANNOUNCES
TENTATIVE SCHEME FOR DATE
The U. of M. club of Detroit has is-
sued an invitation to hold the first
triennial meeting in Detroit, during
the coming year. The by-laws of the
assosiation state that these meetings
must be held in some city other than
Ann Arbor.
This invitation was accepted by the
board of directors of the Alumnae as-
sociation at its meeting here June 13
and Pres. Mason P. Rumney has an-
nounced a tentative scheme for hold-
ing it on the two days preceding the
alumni reunion here in Ann Arbor
next June.
This meeting will be one of the big
goals pointed to in all activities of the
Alumni association during the coming
year. Each club will be expected to
send one or wore delegates to the
meeting.
ALUMNUS PUBLICATION
MAKES JUNE APPEARNCE
The Michigan Alumnus which is is-
sued weekly during the college year
by the Alumni Association of the Uni-
versity of Michigan made its first
summer apearance last Thursday. It
contains the commencement address
in, full, Dr. Bryan's baccalaureate
sermon, accounts of the commence-
ment gagees against the Japanese and
other alumni news. It will appear
again early next week, giving ac-
counts of the recent reunions, after
which it will appear only monthly un-
til October.
SUMMER ENROLLMENT
EXCEEDS_3000 MARK
' Registration in the summer session
of the University had reached the
total mark of 3,083 students yester-
day afternoon, according to Dean Ed-
ward If. Kraus, of the summer session.
This figure is an increase of 17 over
the 3,066 students enrolled in the sum-
mer session enrolled in the summer
session at this time last year. This
figure does not include the enrollment
in the Biological station which open-
ed its session yesterday.

U . OF M. THLETES
IN OLYMPIC GAMES
Brooker And Hubbard To Represent
U. S. While Hester Runs
For Canada
TRACK AND FIELD EVENTS
START IN PARIS SATURDAY
Attention of Michigan sport fans
will be centered in Paris next week
when three University of Michigan
track and field athletes will compete
for two nations at the Olympic games.
James Brooker, '25L, DeHart Hubbard,
'25, and George Hester, '27Ed are the
men who will carry the Michigan col-
ors in France. Brooker, a consistent-
ly good pole vaulter, and Hubbard,
who bids fair to win the broad jump,
will compete for the United States,
while Hester, who is a Canadian by
birth, will represent his native land
in the sprints.
Brooker can always be counted up-
on to do close to 13 feet in the vault.
He is a product of Cass City high
school. He began early to show prom-
ise, vaulting 11 feet while he was yet
in high school. At Michigan he learn-
ed proper vaulting form under Coach
Steve Farrell, and representing Michi-
gan for the first time at Illinois he
won his event with a leap of 12 feet,
8 1-2 inches. Since that time he has
steadily improved. Last spring he
won the pole vault at the conference
meet, with a mark of 12 feet, 11 inch-
es.
Hubbard Sure
Brooker has one more year of com-
petition at Michigan. He has been
named captain of the 1925 squad.
DHart Hubbard, the sensational
negro broad jumper, seems assured of
a first in at least one event. He Is
entered in both the broad jump and
the hop-step-and-jump. In the form-
er he has several times approached
the wrIlds record of 25 feet, 3 inches,
held by E. O. Gourdin of Harvadr.
Last y'ar he won the event at the Na-
tional Intercollegiate meet at Chi-
cago, jumping 25 feet, 2 inches. Hub-
bard also has one more yeard of com-
petition.
Contests Open July 5
George Hester, a member of the
freshman squad last spring, is a
sprinter. Competing a year ago for
a Detroit high school squad, he stood
out as the class of the cinder path
stars of the state. He is credited with
equalling the scholastic record in the
hundred yard dash. Hester will have
three years to compete for Michigan.
The Olympic track and field cham-
pionships will begin Saturday July 5.
M. C, M PRESIDENT DIES
IN ILINIS-WRECKI
Chicago, June 30.-(y A.P.)-Six
persons, including Dr. F. W. McNair,
president of the Michigan College of
Mines, lost their lives and 16 others
were injured today when a soldiers
mail train crashed into the rear end
of eastbound passenger train No. 2,
from Denver, at Buda, Ill.
Dr. McNair, three women and W. J.
Brechetel of Aurora, Ill., fireman on
mail train No. 8, weretkilled and J. A.
Triplett, a porter on train No. 2, died
in a hospital at Princeton, Ill.
Among the injured were Mrs. Marion
Chisain, Washington, D. C., internal-
ly injured.

Choral Union To
Hold Rehearsal
The Summer Choral Union, under
the direction of George Oscar Bowen,
Supervisor of Music in the Ann Arbor
schools, will hold its second rehear-
sal from 7 to 8 o'clock tonight. Prac-
tice hours are on Tuesday and Thurs-
day evenings at the University School
of Music, Maynard street, the first
rehearsal being held last Thursday.
No "tryouts" are necessary for en-
rollment. Any Summer Session stu-
dent interested in choral work may
join, however, regular attendance is
required.
As is customary, the Summer Chor-
al Union will give the last concert in
the Faculty Concert Series. A few
more voices are still needed to fill the
sixty or seventy places, which the
Summer Choral Union offers,

YOST TO TALK ON
ATHLETICS, HEALTH
Will Outline Ideal Athletic Program
For All Students in Large
Universities
DEVELOPMENT OF MAN-POWER
TO BE KEYNOTE OF SPEECH
Coach Fielding H. Yost, director of
Intercollegiate athletics, will give a
lecture at 8 o'clock this evening in the
auditorium of the Natural Science
building. The subject of Mr. Yost's
lecture will be "Athletics in 1It~ation
to Endurance and Public Health."
The lecture will outline the athletic
program at Michigan and Mr. Yost
will give his ideas concerning the
ideal program of physical education
that he believes should be instituted
in the University.
The development of man-power is
the keynote of Mr. Yost's ideal physi-
cal exercise program and he will at-
tempt to develop this idea by showing
that it is primarily through service
that all good originates. One of Mr.
Yost's favorite expressions is, "Serv-
'ice is the mother of success." He
develops this idea in a logical and
practical manner, showing that serv-
ice is not an impractical and idealistic
idea but a practical, workable, mat-
ter of self interest.
Coach Yost will stress the need for
a required course in physical educa-
tion and an allotment of time for each
student to spend in pursuing this phy-
sical exercise.
The lecture will be along the line
of some of the material in the new
public healtL course which is being of-
fered here for the first time this sum-
mar and will attempt to show the ef-
fect of athletics upon the public
health of individuals.
This is one of the regular lectures
that are being offered this summer
and the public is invited to attend.
EDUAOSWILL PLY
FOR BASEBALL LAURLS
Men in the school of education will
have two baseball teams during the
summer, according to plans made at
the first meeting of the Men's Edu-
cational Club. At that time captains
were elected and both of the teams
were organized.
John Dalrimple superintendent of
schools at Fenton, Michigan, will head
the superintendents' team, and C. C.
Tuck, principal of one of the Cleve-
land high schools, will lead the op-
posing nine. The initial game Is
scheduled for this week, with other
games to be decided upon later.
Following the usual procedure, the
winers of the student teams will fin-
ish the season by playing a team made
up of members of the educational fac-
ulty.
TO VISIT FORD PLANT
WENEDA ATERNOON
Summer excursion number 3 which
consists of a tour of the Ford Motor
Company's Highland Park plant will
begin at 1 o'clock Wednesday after-

noon when the party will take the
interurban for Detroit at Packard and
State streets.
This trip had originally been plann-
ed for last Saturday but was post-
poned because the Ford plant is not
operating on Saturdays. Ford's effi-
cient methods of production have long
been known and the people who take
the excursion Wednesday will have an
opportunity to see these methods in
operation. Special guides will con-
duct the party through the plant
which is a complete and very busy
city in itself. ,
Carlton F. Wells, who is in charge
of the excursion, has asked that, as
usual, all those who wish to take the
trip leave their names at the Summer
session office, room 8, University Hall
before six o'clock tonight. The trip
through the plant will end at 4:45 and
the party will arrive back in Ann Ar-
bor at 8:45. The total bill, includ-
ing dinner in Detroit, will come to
about $2.54.

Speaks

Fielding H. Yost
Coach Yost, the famous Michigan
football Mentor will a lecture tonight
on the regular summer session pro-
gram. His subject will be "Athletics
in Relation to Endurance and Public
Health."
100 BOYS AT FRESH
AIR0CAMPDOUTING
Twenty Four Nationalities Represent-
ed In City Groups At Patterson
Lake
SPORTS, GAMES, AND TALKS
OCCUPY DAY OF VACATIONERS
One hundred boys from Flint, Jack-
son, and Ann Arbor are now attending
the Fresh Air camp of the C. C. A.,
which is being held on Patterson Lake
Livingston County. The summer is
divided into four sections of 10 days
each, the first of which is over next
Saturday.
No distinction is made as to race or
reigion, there being as many as 24
nationalities and 13 religious beliefs
represented. In the present group
there are 42 negroes. The Visiting
Nurse association, the Dunbar Civic
League, and the university Social Ser--
vice department recommend boys for
the camp.
Personal Inspection
A day at camp opens with the bugle
call and flag drill. After setting up
exercises, comes the tooth brush drill
which is a new thing to most of the
boys. The brushes and tooth-paste
are furnished by drug stores, and are
put to very hard use. Breakfast and
camp duties over, the campers are
divided into 4- groups; nature study,
boy scout work, first aid work, and
Indian craft. An Ottawa chef and his
squaw, Rose, have been engaged to
teach this work. They dress in the
full regalia of their tribe, and teach
rug weaving, canoe making, bead
work, and put on Indian programs.
They are also constructing a model
log cabin.
One of the most important events of
the day is personal inspection. Clean-
liness is stressed above all things, and
to the two celanest boys of the days
a prize is given, such' as a necktie.
Last summer one boy had to be sent
back to the lake 7 times before he
passed the inspection. The rest of the
time is spent in sports, and the day
is brought to a close' by a gathering
around the camp-fire, where charact-
er talks are given by the leaders, or
by faculty members from the Univer-
sity. At the end of each section, the
boys hate to leave and beg to be al-
lowed to come back next year, if not
before.
* Student Leaders
All of the leaders donate their time
gratis. Mr. L. C. Reimann, '16 is
camp director. Among the other
workers are Thomas DRasef, '25L,
Raymond Arndt, '24, George Griffin,
'24E, Daniel Walz, '24, Sydney Simp-
son, '27M, Arnold Stoll, '24E, Alexan-
der Maslow, Wm. Sclott, '28, James
Brown, 2S, Charles Highley, '26, Rob-
ert Wallace, Rev. L. M. Wellick, Jam-
es Jackson, '24E, and "Dad" Lock-
wood.
Father Hennepin was one of the
first white men known to have seen

Niagara Falls, he visited that part of
the country in 1678,

Tonight

AS MCAOOO HOLDS
LEAD OVER SMITH
THREE FAVORITE SONS LOSE SUP-
PORT-FERRIS, SWEET, KEND-
RICK ELIMINATED
EXPRESS SATISFACTION 1
OVER VOTING RESULTS
Balloting Continues to Tvelve Votes;
Forsee Long Drawn Ogt Ses-
sion for Convention
Madison Square Garden, New York,
June 30.-(By A.P.)-At the Democrat-
ic national convention assemtlef to-
night probably for a long drawn out
session, at the latest balloting, had
reached this score: Smith 278, Mc-
Adoo 444 6-10, J. W. Davis 63,Under-
wood 45 1-2, Wilson 30 1-2. Cox 60,
Gov. Davis of Kansas 32 4-10, Glass
25, Robinson 21, Silver 28, Rothie 17
1-2, Gov. Bryan 15, Houston, Thomp-
son 1, and William Jennings Bryan 1.
Three favorite sons have been elim-
inated altogether: Senator Wood-
bridge N. Ferris of Michigan, Governor
Sweet of Colorado, and Senator Kon-
dick of Wyoming.
The McAdoo-Smith forces have ex-
pressed their satisfaction with the
standing of the score and declared the
balloting had come out as their es-
timate.
Radio Keeps Camp
Davis Students In
Contact With Men
Engineering students at Camp Dav-
is are keeping in contact with the
news of the day and the time signals
through the use of the radio, according
to a message received by Dean Edward
H. Kraus, of the Summer session, from
Prof. Clarence T. Johnson, director of
Camp Davis.
Professor Johnson stated that the
students appreciate the entertainment
received through the radio during the
long evenings at camp. They are able
to get concerts from Pittsburgh,
Springfield, Chicago, Philadelphia, and
New York, but have difficulty in get-
ting Detroit, St. Louis and stations
that are'heard easily at Ann Arbor.
Students are doing all of the work
at the camp this year. The assistants
doing the work in construction and
running the truck.

WHAT'S GOING ON

TUESDAY
5:00-The Economics of International
Payments with special reference to
Reparations. Prof. C. E. Griffin.
Natural Science auditorium.
-7:00-Choral Union rehearsal-School
of Music.
8:00-Lecture-Athletics in Relation
to Endurance and Public Health-
Prof. F. H. Yost. Natural Science
auditorium. .n
WEDNESDAY
1:00-Excursion No. 3-Ford Motor
company-Corner of State and
Packard.
4:00-Bible class, Upper room Lane
hall.
5:00-Lecture in French-Les pre-
miers rapports intellectuals entre
la France et l'Amerique, Prof. Gil-
bert Chinard. Natural Science aud-
itorium.
7:00-Meeting of Phi Delta Kappa,
room 302, Union.
8:00-Concert-Mr. Harry Russell
Evans, organist, Miss Emily Mutter,
violin, Hill auidtorium.
THURSDAY
4:00-Bible class,. Upper room, Lane
hall.
5:00-Niagara Falls and Its History.
(Illustrated). Mr. C. R Hussey, Na-
tural Science auditorium.
7:00-Choral Union rehearsal, School
of Music.
8:00-Educational motion pictures, Na-
tural Science auditorium,

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