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June 28, 1924 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-06-28

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THE WEATHER
UNSETTLED
TODAY

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4:Datt

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE
PRICE FIVE CENTS

VOL. XV. No. 8

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JUNE 28, 1924

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KLN ADLEAGUE
STILL BLOCK WAY
TO SETTLEMENT
PLATFORM STILL UNSETTLED
FEW PLANKS ADOPTED
NOMINATIONS COINTINIE
REPUBLICANISM FLAX ED
IN OPENING ARTICLES
TeaPot Dome, Daugherty Investiga-
tion And Veterans 'Bureau Scandals
All Included
New York, June 27.-By AP)-The
Ku Klux Klan and the League of Na-
tions today remained the only stumbl-
ing blocks in the way of an agree-
ment among the Democratic platform
builders.
The platform committee toiled over
the party declarations until nearly
5:30 this morning before giving up
the effort to complete its work. It
finally adjourned, however, until 2
o'clock this afternoon, after instruct-
ing the drafting committee to meet
at noon for another attempt to reach
an Ā°agreement on the glan and league
issues.
Thirty-five or more planks had been
put into place when the committee
adjourned and little difficulty was en-
countered until the klan and league
hurdles were reached.
Republicanism Flayed
The first and principal plank, as
reported . by the subcommittee and
approved, deals with Republican "in-
efficiency and corruption," charging
the present administration with fail-
ure and accusing it of attempting to
impede and stop" the senate investi-
gations.
Reference is made specifically to the
Teapot Dome, Daugherty and Veter-
an's bureau investigations and to the
charges against Republican members
of congress which followed the Chi-
cago grand jury inquiry into the vet-
eran's bureau case.
For relief of agriculture the com-
mittee would pledge the party to fos-
ter creation of national co-operative
marketing associations and a corpor-
ation or commission to increase ex-
ports of farm products, to take steps
to bring agriculture to a parity with
other industries, to seek reduction of.
transportation costs on products
through development of internal wat-
erways and to move for revision of the
tariff and of rail and water transpor-
tation rates.
It also calls for an international
policy of co-operation designed to re-
vive Amerncan exports to Europe.
The subcommittee's law enforcement
declaration was revised by the com-
mittee to make the pledge apply spec-
ifically to prohibition. It also assails
the Republican administration's en-
forcement record, but avoids definite
mention of the eighteenth amendment
and the Volstead act.
Hollister Pleases
In Reading Marner
Distinctly entertaining was the lec-
ture recital given tonight by Prof. R.
D. T. Hollister in the auditorium of
University hall. The subject was the
reading of George Eliot's "Silas Mar-
ner."
The auditorium was filled to ca-
pacity and the audience showed much
interest In and appreciation of Pro-

fessor Hollister's interpretation.
The story was, of necessity, great-
ly shortened, but retained its origin-
al charm and virility despite this fact.
Not a little of the audience's interest
was due to Professor Hollister's man-
ner of delivery which was pleasing in
the extreme.
Tlie chvaracterization was partic-
ularly charming.
ti

A Dark Horse?

Library

Exhibit Tells
"History Of The Book"

Jap Leader

A Babylonian bill of lading carved
from stone in spherical form and
somewhat larger than a walnut is one
of the unusual items in an instructive
exhibit at the University library.
"History of the Books", is the title of
the exposition, located on the main
floor. Though intended to be of in-
terest primarily to sudents in library
methods, it is drawing attention of
summer students of all departmetns.
Business documents carved on stone
represent the first stage in the de-
velopment of the printing and binding
of books. In thesection headed "Mat-
erials" are samples of the papyrus
plant, a finished papyru document,
a prayer board carved on wood, writ-
ing on bamboo, vellum, and palm leav-
es.
The series shows how the first print-
books were made to imitate hand-
written manuscripts, and how the in-
vention of movable type brought about
a change in style. The University
library possesses a number of books

printed before 1500, among which is
a page of original Caxton. The Cax-
ton press is represented in this exhibit
of two facsimiles, while there are orig-
inal specimen of the Aldus, Elsevier,
and Koberger presses.
In the section on "Illustration" is
a copy of the Nuremberg Chronicle,
published about thetime of the dis-
covery of America. This contains
about two hundred wood cuts.
The display representing bindings
is made up largely of gifts and loans
from the remarkable collection of the
Hon. A. M. Todd of Kalamazoo, who
has interested himself in that special
line. A beautiful' collection of anci
ent and modern bindings is on per-
manent display on the second floor of
Alumni Memorial Hall.
A section showing modern American
printing representing the highest
stage of the art completes the history
of the book. This exhibit will remain
two weeks, when it will be replaced by
another.

ENROLLMENT IN
SUMMER SESSION
WILL TOP 3,000
ALL SCHOOLS SHOW GROWTH EX.
CEPT FOR SLIGHT DECREASE IN
LIT SCHOOL
DEAN KRAUS PREDICTS
TOTAL FIGURE OF 3,250
Registration Shows Increase of 221
Over Number Listed At Same Time
Last Year

Saninel Ralston

In all the struggle for the Demo-
cratic nomination, no figure stands;
out more prominently than that of
Senator Samuel Ralston of Indiana,
who is one of the leading "dark hors-
es" of the convention.
Dean Hamilton
Is Guest Of
Women 'sLeague
Miss Jean Hamilton, University Dean
of Women, was guest of honor yester-
day afternoon at the Women's League
reception held in the gardens and on
the terrace of Martha Cook Building.
Many women here for the summer ses-
sion tookadvantage of theaffair to
meet Dean Hamilton and to becomeIc
acquainted with each other.
There was no set program for thet
afternoon. Entertainment was provid-c
ed by Tang and Tavares, well known
on the campus as serenaders andI
Michigan Opera successes. They play-t
ed and sang many of their favoritec
numbers. A chorus of girls added in-
terest to the occassion by singingc
some of the Michigan songs.
During the afternoon the women of
the University met some of the girls
reently graduated and daughters of
faculty members, attending school and
active in campus affairs during theI
winter and spring terms.
Miss Hamilton is leaving on herĀ£
vacation next Monday after a year
spent largly in the effort to gather
sufficient funds for the building of the
Michigan League. The structure is to
be "for Michigan women everywhere",
and will house all women's activities
on the campus.
Miss Helen C. Bishop is acting as
dean during the summer session and
Miss Hamilton's vacation.
Other social events of the League
this summer are being planned and
give promise of several unusually suc-
cessful affairs. They will be an-
nounced as to time and place later.
87 STUDENTS ENROLLED
IN VOCTIONAL COURES
Vocational Training Courses for-
mally conducted by the School of Ed-
ucation in Detroit have been discon-
tinued, according to authorities here.
Such courses have previously been
given ineCass Technical High School,
and were allowed credit in the De-
partment of Education here. Although
the classes in Detroit were very suc-
cessful, it was thought advisable to
strengthen the course on the campus
this summer and retain all the facul-
ty.
Eight courses in vocational educat-
ion. are being offered here now. The
enrollment totals 87. The introduc-
tion to Vocation Educational is seem-
ingly one of the most popular cours-
es. It makes special reference to in-
dustrial education and considers such
topics as practical and household arts
and corporation schools. Methods of
Teaching Mechanical Drawing, and
Vocational Guidance a'nd Placement
are among the other courses listed.
Moon Versus Earth I Size
If the earth could be shrunk to the
size of the moon, a train running sixty
miles an hour could mae the trip
from New York to San Francisco in
about fourteen and one-hal hours.

REGENTS ANNOUNCE
GRAD FELLOWSHIPS
Appointmenits To Scholarships All
For Year 1924-25; Includes Grad-
uates From Other Colleges
ONLY FOREIGN INSTITUTION
ACADEMIE DE STRASSBURG
Recommendation for fellowships and
scholarships which were made by the
executive board of the graduate school1
were acted on at the last meeting of
the Board of Regents and a number
of appointments have been made.
The appointments are all for the year
1924-25 and the summer of 1924 and
they include several Michigan stu-
dents as well as graduates of other'
colleges.'
The Cole fellowship in botany was
awarded to Lewis E. Wahmeyer, grad.,
Carl Braun fellowship to Charles Say-
ships to William Read, grad., and to
William DeJongh, grad. Coral De-
maray, '24 Ed. was appointed to one
of the Pendleton Classical scholar-
ships. The Lawton fellowship was
given to Dean McLaughlin, grad., the
Carl Braun fellowship to Charles Say-
ton, and the -fellowship given by the
E. I. duPont de Nemours and Company
in chemistry, to John Pernert, grad.,
Raymond, Hoekstra, grad., Walter
Shriner, and Edward Washburn, grad.,
were among those appointed to Uni-
versity fellowships. The only Michi-
gan student to win a University schol-
arship was Miu Chang, grad. The
State College scholarships were
awarded to one of the 1924 graduates
of each of the following colleges; Al-
bion, Hillsdale, Hope, Kalamazoo, Cal-
vin, Olivet, and Michigan Agricultur-
al college.
There were a number of colleges
outside of the states represented In
the various appointments, among them
Harvard, Yale and Stanford univer-
sities, Princeton University, Indiana
University, Indiana State Normal, the
University of Colorado, and Mt. Holy-
oke College. The only foreign in-
stitution represented was the Academ-
ie de Strasbourg, France.
Library Purchases
Scientific Works
Two important collections of sci-
entific works have recently been pur-
chased by the University Library. A
series of 25 volumes entitled "Die
Graphische Gesellschaft," which was
sent to the Library from Holland, is
interesting because of its complete]
treatment of engravings of all kinds,
-copper plate, wood engraving, and
etching, during the 14th and 15th
centuries in Germany, the Nether-
lands, and Italy.
The other collection is one on the
history of science gathered by the em-
inent Italian scientist, Prof. Gilberta
Govi. These volumes deal with th
history of optics, numismatics, and
electricity, and supplement to ad-
vantage the collections which the li-
brary is building up in the history of
astronomy, chemistry, medicine, and
other sciences.

DEMONSTRATION OF
BLOWING PLEASES
Frank Schaeffer Of Laboratory Appar-
atus Co., And Prof. Barker Exhibit
Method
AUDIENCE FILLS AUDITORIUM
OF NATURAL SCIENCE BUILDING
Before a crowd assembled in the
auditorium of the Natural Science
building Mr. Frank Schaefer of the
Laboratory Apparatus ;Companiy of
Ann Arbor demonstrated the method
used in blowing glass implements of
various kinds and of glass ornaments
such as are used on Christmas trees.
After blowing the ornaments Mr.
Shaefer silvered and colored them in
shades. Prof. E. F. Barker, assistant
professor of Physics in the University
aided Mr. Shaefer in the demonstra-
tion.
The exhibition was a success as-evi-
denced by the unusually large crowd
which taxed the capacity of Natural
Science auditorium and the close at-
tention paid to the demonstrator.
The demonstration was one of a
series that is being given for the bene-
fit of students of the Summer Ses-
sion. The lectures that have been
given so far have proved popular with
students and the series is expected to
be more successful than any given
in recent years.
I.

Viscount Takaaki Kato
Viscount Takaaki Kato, leader of
the Kenseikai party, which the fall
of the Kiyouri government made the
dominating party in Japan, is one of
the most bitter of the critics of the
United States in Japan. His attitude
is not a new one, however, as his ad-
verse sentiments, go back as far as the
peace conference of Versailles at
which he represented Japan.
The Viscount is not to be confused
with the late Baron Kato, delegate to
Japan to the Washington conference
on limitation of armaments.

Registration in all of the colleges
of the University with the exception
of the enrollment in the Biological
station shows an increase of 221 stu-
dents over the 2,816 registered in the
summer session at this time last year,
or a total of 3,037, according to Dean
Edward H. Kraus, of the summer ses-
sion.
The Medical school, Graduate school
and School of Education show an in-
crease in the enrollment over last
year while the otehr schools remain
approximately the same or show a
slight decrease. This is due to the
late registration according to Dean
Kraus who is confident that the total
figure for the summer session enroll-
ment will reach the 3,250 mark.
Small Decrease
The college of Literature, Science
and the Arts has registered 1,103 stu-
dents this summer. This is a de-
crease of 28 over the 1,131 students
at this time last year. Four hundred
and thirteen students are enrolled in
the Engineering school which shows
a decrease of 24 over the 437 stu-
dents last year. The Medical school
.has an increase of 53 which makes
a total of 290 students. Their figure
for last year was 237.
One hundred and fifty students have
enrolled in this school. The school
of pharmacy shows an enrollment of
13 students. This is also a decrease
over the 19 students registered last
year.

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Outdoor Class
In Art Taught
By J.P. Slusser
An out-door art class doing work in
water-colors, charcoal or pencil is be-
ing conducted for the fourth, time this{
summer by Prof. J. P. Slusser. Most
of the work is done right on the cam-
us but trips out Geddes and elsewhere
in search of material are made when
automobiles make this possible.
The class is made up of three types
of students; architects, landscape
architects, and such others as have
a special interest in the work. Mr.
Slusser, who is a member of the sum-
mer faculty of the College of Archi-
tecture, has had a studio in New York
for a number of years and is becom-
ing well known as a painter and decor-
ative designer. That last summer's
class was a distinct success is evi-
denced by the fact that a number of
pictures were sold at the exhibition
held in Memorial Hall at the close of
the season. From this summer's work
most of which is being done in water-
color, his own chosen medium, Mr.
Slusser hopes to obtain enough mater-
ial for another exhibition. At pres-
ent, twenty students are enrolled in
the class.

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LINCOLN IMPERSONATOR
TO BME PERFORMANCE
Lincoln Caswell will appear here
July 8 in an entertainment "consist-
ing of character sketches of Abra-
ham Lincoln. The performace is a
costumed monologue it which Mr.
Caswell interprets and impersonates
the character of the Inarytred presi-
dent.
The presentation is an unusual at-,
traction given under the auspices of
the public speaking department and;
particularly the play; production andI
interpretive reading classes. Mr. Uas-I
well comes highly recommended by
everyon'e who has seen him and by
press reports from -the whole country.
The enrollment in this department
has risen with the general increase
in attendance in summer school, ;and
many have been; refused admittance
today according to Professor Hollis-
ter. Two full 'length plays will be
given during the summer term. One
of these will be "You and I," Philip
Perry's prize play of 1922, which had
a very succesful season in New York
last winter. The other has not yet
been selected.
Washington, JXne 27-Evacuation
of Haiti by American forces will be
effected as soon as internal condi-
tions in the republic make it possi-
ble.
Detroit, June. 27.-William 'Baker,
38, was drowned in the Detroit river
yesterday wl n he fell from a goat
on which, he was working.

Tom Lovell Plans-
To Speak Tonight
Doctor Tom Lovell has announced
that he will begin holding his regular
summer meetings tonight at the State
street end of .the liagonal. He had
hoped to begin his meetings earlier
in conjunction with "RailroadJack"
but "Jack's" failure to appear in Ann
Arbor has led the doctor to attempt to
do the work alone.
These informal evening meetings
have come to be an institution at the
summer sessions and Michigan's
"Poet and Cobbler" is-always assur-
red of a good sized audience. Besides
his distinction as a poet Tom has won
a number of honorary degrees. Two
of his latest are "lieutenant-colonel
of archery" and A.W.O.L., "America's I
Writer of Literature."
Ottawa, June 27.- Ratification of
the liquor treaty between the United
States and Canada must await the
next session of the United States sen-
ate.
Detroit, June 27.-Twenty extra pa-
trol cars will be put in operation to
guard outlying districts surrounding
Detroit.
Washington, June 27.-Rrepresent-
ative Edward C. Little of Kansas, died
at a hospital here today.

Graduate Enrollment
The Graduate school has an enroll-
ment of 659 which is an increase of
132 over the 527 students a ttihtsem
132 over the 527 students at this time
last summer. This school shows the
greatest increase of any school in the
University up to date. The school of
education has an enrollment of 409
students which is an increase of 101
over the 308 students enrolled in this
school last year.
Registration in the Coaching school
shows an increase of one over the fig-
ure for last year. This makes a total
of 97 coaches.
Expect 100 Monday
Fifty-four nurses are registered In
the school of education this year.
These nurses were enrolled in the Lit-
erary college last year which accounts
for a portion of the decrease in that
college this year, according to officials
of the summer school.
An average of 100 students are ex-
pected to enroll in the University sum-
mer session Monday. This, plus other
late registration and the students at
the Biological station will raise the
total figure to the predicted number,
according to Dean Kraus.
WHAT'S GOING ON
SATURDAY
8:00-Excursion No. 2- Ford Motor
company, New Detroit Public lib-
rary.
Monday
5:00-Lecture-Manuscript Hunting
in Spain. (Illustrated) Prof. H. A.
Sanders, Natural Science auditorium
8:00-Educational motion pictures-
Asphalt and Asphaltic Products.
Tuesday.
5:00-The Economics of International.
Payments with special reference to
Reparations. Prof. C. E. Griffin.
7:00-Choral Union rehearsal-School
of Music.
8:00-Lecture-Athletics in Relation
to Endurance and Public Health-
Prof. F. H. Yost.
Leningrade, June 27.- Floods in
the Lake Ladoga region have engulf-
ed 61 villages,

I

WARM WEATHER

I

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.,. . 1

Has
Daily
(Pat.
stuff.

nothing on us.
Classified Remedy
App. For) is hot
Try some!
SEE

JIMMIE, JR.
THE AD TAKER
Press Bldg. Maynard St.

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