100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 10, 1924 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-08-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

Ftt tgr
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SUMMER SESSION
Published every morning except Monday
during the summer session.
Member of the Associated Preos. The .As-
sociated Press is exclusively entitled to the
tsse or republicationo oftalleewdispatches
credited to it or not otherwise credited in
this paper and the local news published here-
n.
intered at the postoffice. Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter.
Sublcription by carrier or mail. $.so
00iccs: Ann Arbor Press Building.
Csnmmunicationa, if signed as evidence of
godfaith, will be published in The Summer
Da t the discretion of the Editor. Un-
signed communications will receive no con-
ton. The signature may be omitted i
publcation if desired by the writer. The
Summer Daily does not necessarily endorse
he sentiments expressed in the communica-
Io-.-
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephones 2414 and 176-U
MANAGING EDITOR
ROBERT G. RAMSAY
News Editor..R.....obert S. Mansfield
Chairman of the Editorial 'Board...
..............Andrew E. Propper
City Editor..............Verena Moran
Night Editor.....Frederick K. Sparrow
Telegraph Editor........ Lslie S. Bennett
Womns' Editor ..........Gwendolyn Dew
STAFF MEMBERS
Louise Barley Wenley B. Krouser
" Rosalea Spaulding Marian Kob
Marion Walker J Albert Laansma
Dwigt Coursey Marion Meyer
Marthat Chase Mary Margaret Miller
Wray A. Donaldson Matilda Rosenfeld
Geneva Ewing Dorothy Wall
Maryland E. Hartloff
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone g6o
BUSINESS MANAGER
CLAYTON C. PURDY
Advertising Manager...Hiel M. Rockwell
Copywriting Manager...Noble D. Travis
Circulation Manager.Lauren C. Haight
Publication Manager......C. Wells Christie
Account Manager...........Byron Parker
STAFF MEMBERS
Florence E. Morse Florence McComb
Charles L. Lewis Maryellen Brown
SUNDAY, AUGUST 10, 1924
Night Editor-ROBT. S. MANSFIELD
"In the history of science and
throughout the whole course of
its progress, we see certain
epochs following one another
more or less rapidly.
Some important view is ex-
pressed,. it may be, original or
only revived; sooner orlater it
receives recognition; fellow-
workers spring up; the outcome
of it finds its way into the
school; it is taught and hand-
ed down; and we observe un-
happily that it does not in the
least matter whether the view
be true or fake.
Inreither case, its course is
the same; in either case it
comes in the end to be a mere
phrase, a lifeless word stamped
on the memory.
.. . On the appearance of.
anything new the mass of peo-
ple ask: What is the use of it?
And they are not wrong. For
it is only through its use that
they perceive its value."
-GOETHE.
THE LAST ISSUE
The pleasure derived from a task
completed; the feeling of satisfaction
which comes with the consciousness
of having done one's best; the grat-
Ification attendant upon the realiza-
tion of a work well done, all are with
the staff of the Summer Michigan
Daily today as they prepare their last

issue for publication. If the summer
has meant nothing more to the staff
than an opportunity to do a work of
journalistic nature, it could not have
been wasted, but It has meant far
more and better things than this.
The outward manifestation of the re-
sults of the summer's work can, it
is true, be seen only in the increased
efficiency of the staff, and the facility
with which they have prepared the
news of the campus for publication.
but the lasting results of the sum-
mer go far deeper than this outward
accomplishment and can not be seen;
There has been opportunity to come
together in Intimate companionshi,
and co-operation in a large campus,
activity.
There come times in the life ok
every man when he must wish that
all the yesterdays might be tomor-
rows and tomorrow would not come
He would rather look back upon the
past than start out on the ath to
the sun. And so it is with a lIttl
feeling of regret that the staff of th-
Daily lay down their work, happy
though, in the consciousness thatj
they have done their best, And in draw-
ing to a close its career as the of.]
ficial organ of the University, the
Summer Daily desires to express its1
appreciation to those who have given'
their support, and to those whose
helnful criticism has corrected some

*: Open Letters.:

COPELAND CALLED BACK
TO HIS NE Y.ORK OR
Senator Copeland of New York has
been visiting Dr. Beebe of this city
for the past week but was called back

to his work yesterday morning.
Senator Copeland's home was at
Dexter, Michigan, for. a number of
years and he held a position in the
Homoeopathic department of the Uni-
versity until 1908. He was a very po-
pular man in his University work and
was chosen mayor of Ann Arbor for
one term.

Little investment - big re
the Daily Classifieds.-Adv.
IRVING WARMOLTS, D.S.
Chiropodist and
Orthopedist
707 N. University. Phone 62

TO THE STUDENTS OF THE
MER SESSION

SUM

Fellow Sufferers:
The Summer session is almost over.
A last few feverish days of final ex-
aminations, and then you close your
books, pack your grip, and hop a train
for home and rest. Perhaps as you
sit in a day coach next Friday or Sat-
urday, homeward bound, you will
want to take an inventory of just
what the Summer session has offered
and just what you have gained by
these eight weeks.
You must admit that they have not
been ill-spent. Lectures, excursions,
and classes-have all contributed to
help the time pass quickly and profit-
ably. A survey of the past eight
weeks cannot but cause a feeling of
satisfaction to those who have taken
advantage of it. It is to be hoped thai
this will not be your last summer at
'Michigan.
By next Saturday we will all have
a chance to take the dust off the
seats in the Ann Arbor day coaches;
and we can transfer the dust to
,school books.
See you in September.
Gleefully,
SMYTIE.
TO MEMBERS OF THE SUMMER
SESSION FACULTY
Gentlemen:
We take this opportunity to express
a thought that we feel sure reflects.
the sentiments of the -student body.
We appreciate the care, the patience
and the devotion with which you have
conducted the classes of the Summer
session for the past weeks, and we
feel sure that your work has not been
in vain.
We venture the guess that stu-
.dents are not the only ones who fee'
that they have earned the brief in-
terval of rest from the middle of

August to the opening of the schoo'
year.
Sincerely,
SMYTHE.
TO THE BUILDERS OF OUR NE1
UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS

C-
262

I

Gentlemen:
When we return in September we
expect to find several changes on the
campus.
The new Physics building, situatei-
between the Medical and Engineer-
ing buildings, we hope will be finish-
ed atd ready for occupation; the l
model high school, used last year for
classes of the College of Literature
Science and the Arts, we expect to
find ready for the purposes of the
School of Education; and the new Lit-
erary building, which now appears te
be in the last stages of construction.
will, we hope, be ready to fulfill its
duties. Perhaps even the Law clu

Text Books and Supplies

°s.. ..... __._.._._. ....,
,.

it

t -, '. -

GRAHAM'S

Both Stores

will be ready for the convenience of
those solemn gentlemen with the
heavy case books.
Conditions on the campus are such
that these new buildings are badly
needed. Class roows are congestef
and are in general put to too heavy
use, students are often exjectd to1
walk from a.class in the model high
school to the next class in the Na-_
tural Science building in two minutes,
and we feel that these new "homes of
learning" are essential.
Please do not disappoint us. f
Hopefully,
SMYTHE.
TO THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Fellow Pounders of the Typewriter:
This is our swan song. We here-
by hand over to you the job of of-
ficial journalists to the University of
Michigan.
May the Lord have mercy on you.

sin. For months the sturdy spokes-
coon of the right wing have been de-
nouncing Mr. La Follette because of
his control of the Republican organ-
ization"In his state permitted him to.
dictate the personnel of the Republic-
an Presidential electors. They as-
sumed calmly that he would run in
his state as a Republican and compel
Mr. Coolidge to run as an independ-
ent.

GROOMES' BATHING BEACH
Whitmore Lake
Ref rshments 0 All Kinds

Now comes the Senator's son, Rob-
ert, Jr., announcing that the Ia Fol-
lette-Wheeler candidacy will be sup-
ported by electors running in Wiscon-'
sin as independent progressives. The
lRepublican ticket will be left free for
;Republican electors whom the G. O.
P. organization can rely on to support
Coolidge and Dawes.
Some weeks =ago the La Follette
man who was Republican National
committeeman in Wisconsin- resigned.
rNow the ticket in that state is made
free to regular Republicans. The sit-
uation will be bitter to staid old par-
ty spokesmen. Neither Reublican nor
Democratic leaders have possessed con-
fidence of carrying Wisconsin against
La Follette. But they felt they might
at least be left the melancholoy com-
fort of having something to assail.

I

ilUliElillll
.:.
-.
...
,:.
_
s
r
..
w
r
es
r
r
r

Ill

DANCING-

Every Nite (except Monday) and All
Day Sunday at

ISLAND LAKE
Follow M-65 Out North Main
Near Brighton

In
THE

Sympathy,
SUMMER DAILY.

1._______________________

i

of the mistakes that they have mad
on the way.
AT SEA WITH CONRAD
Some idea of the descriptive pow-
ers with which Joseph Conrad, whose
recent death all lovers of literature
mourn, endowed his tales of the sea,
making him one of the three or four
greatest literary figures of our time,
can be grasped from this quotation
from the The Nigger of the Narcissus,
one of his earlier works:
". ...Forward, the lookout man.
erect between the flukes of the twz
anchors, hummed an endless tune.
keeping his eyes fixed dutifully ahead
in a vacant stare. A multitude of
stars coming out into the clear night
peopled the emptiness of the sky.
They glittered, as if alive above the
sea; they surrounded the running
ship on all sides; more intense than
the eyes of a staring crowd, and as in-
scrutable as the souls of men.
"The passage had begun, and the
ship, a fragment detached from the
earth, went on lonely and swift like
a small planet. Round her the abys-
ses of sky and sea met an unattain-
able frontier. A great circular soli-
tude moved with her, ever chsanging
and ever the same, always monoton-
ous and always imposing.
"Now and then another white speck,
burdened with life, appeared far off
,-disappeared, intent on its own des-
tiny. The sun looked upon her all
day, and every morning rose with a
burning, round stare of undying cur-
iosity. She had her own future; she
was alive with the lives of those be-
ings who trod her decks; like that
earth which had given her up to the1
sea, she had an intolerable load of
regrets and hopes.
On her lived timid truth and audac-
ions lives; and, like the earth, she
was unconscious, fair to see- and
condemned by men to an innoble fate.
TPhe august loneliness of her path
lent dignity-to the sordid inspiration
of her pilgrimage. She drove foaming
to the southward, as if guided by the
courage of a high endeavor. The smil-
ing greatness of the sea dwarfed the
extent of time. The days raced aft-
er one another, and the nights, event-
ful and short, resembled fleeting
dreams."
Not all men can realize the ambi-
tion to travel, but the genius of Jos-
eph Conrad has brought the sea to
our bookshelf.
Rome, Aug. 8.-Il Mondo, a newspa-
per, wonders why Charles U. Hughes,
American secretary of state, skipped
Rome. It thinks, perhaps, that the
Italian minister in Washington will
be able to explain.
Little investment -- big returns,
the Daily Clasifde4s.-Ad.y,

- - 1

.p

I

EDITORIAL COMMENT

I
.

i

"LON MORRIS COLLEGE"
(The New York Times)
"I would," said Falstaff to Prince
Hal, "that thou and I knew where a
commodity of good names were to be
bought." The Dallas Morning News
reports such a place in academic cir-
.les. The Rev. Alonzo Morris of Pitts-
burg, Camp county, Texas, familiarily
jknown In East Texas as "Brother
Lon," has given $100,000 to Alexand-
er college at Jacksonville, Texas, and
ps a result the name of the college
will be changed to "Lon Morris col-
lege" in honor of the donor.
The founder of this institution,
which must have been in existen e
for many years, since "some of Tex -
as' greatest men" have been grad-
uated from it (Governor "Tom"
Campbell, Congressman John Box and.
Judge "Dan" Walker being especially
mentioned among its alumni), was the
Rev. Isaac Alexander. But it is in no
;faithlessness to his memory that this
change of name has been made, for
pIe often told the trustees, it is grate-
fully recaIled, that if some one would
endow the school, he whose name it
has borne for so many years would be
glad to have the college bear the
name of the new benefactor. The sum
,seems rather meagre for a sole en-
dowment. But the report- states that
"Brother Lon," who seems to be well
endowed financially for a preacher,
for he has recently made large gifts
to other Texas institutions, expects
to do more for this college which has
taken his name. New buildings are
4n prospect, and one of them is to
bear the name of Mrs. Morris, "wh(
has always been connected with
"Brother Lon's' gifts."
One's name appended forever to a
college cheer is rather to be chosen
than great riches, and the loving fav-
or of a body of undergraduatesthan'
silver or gold. "Brother Lon" has
(made a Soiomonic choice. And if one,
would know where other like com-x
,pnodity may be bought, a generous-
;minded person can easily find in the1
-long list of unendowed or inadequate-
ply endowed institutions a board of
trustees willing to write over its ac-
ademic doorway the Virgilian line:
"'Nec me meminisse pigebit -," filling
n the blank with the name of the giv-
en Alma Mater.f
,THEIR LAST MELANCHOLY COX-
FORT GONE
(The Detroit News)

A

1i~~~

ENERGINE

I

When You
Return to
Ann Arbor
After the happy vacation
which we sincerely.hope
you are beginning at the
end of this busy week,
Stop in at 317 South
tate Street
It may be with the open-
ing of college in Septem-
ber, or next year when
yo ureturn for another
Summer Session after a
year of labor;
Or
it may be as you drive
through our beautiful City
on your way to other du-
ties.

I

I

ODORLESS CLEANING
We're the cleaners you'be heard so much abut,
For our customers all recommend
Our consistent good k>ork, for they 're ne'er in do
That lye '1 do the salme pork for a friend,

;'

PHONE Garment Cleaning

PHONE
2508

I

"The Home

Qf E nergII1e6

209 South Fourth Abenue

p___________

i

-*

We extend to our friends
and their friends a cordial
invitation to visit our store
and examine the latest
items of interest in Toilet
Goods from the world's
best.
The Store where the
Sun Shines.
G, Claude Drake's
Drug and Prescription
Store
Cor. North Univ. Ave.
and State St.
Phone 308
"The Quarry"

The Everhot's best for

summer cooking

Priced $5 to $16.50

A complete meal is easily and quickly
prepared on an Everhot electric stove
wherever there's an ordinary light
socket within reach. Fries, boils,
broils, bakes, toasts.-and steams. Con-
vement and economical.

The Detroit Edison
Company

It is a bitter blow to stolid crit-
cism, this announcement that Senato
La Follette will not seek to captial-
1ze the Republican name in Wiscoa-

Read the Want Ads

Main at William

Telephone 2800

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan