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August 06, 1924 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-08-06

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THE WEATHER
SHOWERS; COOLER
TODAY

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xl

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIHT WIRE
SERVICE

e

VOL. XV. No. 40

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6, 1924

PRICE FIVE CENTS

AMEICAN FLIES
REACH RMAN
WITHOUT TROUBLE
"CHICAGO" AND "NEW ORLEANS"
CROSS ICELAND IN FIVE
HOURS
NAVAL PATROL CAREFUL
IN WATCH OVER PLANE S
Lieut. Wade Aboard "Richmond" Much
Concerned Over Loss of
His Plane
Reykjavik, Iceland, Aug. 5-(By A.
-.) -Lieut. Lowell H. Smith in the
Chicago and Lieut. Eric Nelson in the
New Orleans, arrived here from Hoefn
Hornafjord on the cross-Iceland lap
of their round-the-world flight at 2:15
this afternoon.
Both planes landed on the waters
of the inner harbor, making fine land-
ings. The two pilots with their me-
chanics, Lieut. Leslie P. Arnold and
Lieut. John Harding, Jr., were feeling
well and their machines were in good
condition.
The American army airplanes on
their world flight hopped off at 9:15
o'clock this morning for Reykiavik.
In the get-away, the Chicago, with
Lieut. Smith and Lieut. Leslie P. Ar-
nold, his mechanician took the air
first.
Lieut. Eric Nelson and Lieut. John
Harding, Jr., in the New Orleans, fol-
lowed a moment later. They circled
the harbor for a moment, waved far-
wells and then headed along the Ice-
land coast toward their destination.
Every precaution was taken by the
naval patrol to guard the two remain-
ing army airplanes in their short
flight.
The U. S. Raleigh remained at Hoefn
Hornafjord, where the "New Orleans"
piloted by Lieut. Eric Nelson landed
from Kirkwal, Scotland, on Saturday
and the "Chicago" commanded by
Lieut. Lowell H. Smith on Sunday.
The destroyer Billinsley was sta-
tioned 20 miles east of Reykjavik,1
while the Richmond arrived at Rek-
javik at 2 p. in. The distance of the
flight was slightly more than 300
miles.
Lient. Leigh Wade and his mech-
.anician, Sergt. Ogden, who are aboard
the Richmond, are rested after their
trying experience of Sunday in which
they lost their plane, the "Boston"
after a forced landing at sea on the
way from Kirkwall to Hoefn Horna-
fjord. They appear most concerned
over the loss of their machine, which
they had hoped to salvage for senti-
mental reasons, even if they never
flew it again.
NUMBERS F COURSES
CHANGED IN CATALOGE
The nomenclautre for the groups of
courses under the renumbering has
been settled as follows:
Courses 1-30 and 31-100, Elemen-
tary or Introductory, as the depart-
ments may prefer; Courses 101-200,
Advanced, open to undergraduates and
graduates; Courses 201-300, primarily
for graduates.
The new announcements coming out
will contain the new numbers and
there will be an index of the old and
new numbers in the back of the cat-

alogue.I

Ex-Crown Prince'sI
Son Goes To WorkI

New "Who's Who" Has Names
Of 132 Ann Arbor Residents

Made Commander
Of British Fleet

Ann Arbor is represented in the
new edition of Who's Who in America
by 132 names which is an increase of
22 names over the 110 in the 1922-
1923 edition.
The publication of the 1924-1925 ed-
iion of Who's Who in America marks
its 25th anniversary. The first edition
was published in 1899 and a revised
edition has been published every two
years since that time. The names for
Who's Who are selected in an effort
to choose the best known men and
women in the country. At the pres-
ent time there are 25,356 names in
the edition. This represents one
out of every 4,800 of the total popula-
tion of the United States.
The death roll has made necessary
the omission of 1,129 sketches which
appeared in the last volume. Retire-
ment from public office, when official
position was the only ground for in-
clusion, also accounts for the elimin-
ation of a number of names. A total

of 1,695 sketches have been eliminated
in this volume.
This edition of Who's Who contains
a study of the educational advantages
enjoyed by the people listed in Who's
Who in America, with educational
statistics and also a study concerned
with the women in Who's Who by
Prof. Stephen S. Visher, of Indiana
University.
Detroit has a list of 168 names in
the new edition of the book. The state
of Michigan has two and one-third
pages devoted to an index of its prom-
inent residents in Who's Who.
The qualifications for admission to
Who's Who in America divide the elig-
ibles into two classes: (1) those
who are selected because of special
prominence in creditable lines of
work, thus making them subjects of
interest to the country; and (2) those
v-ho are included on account of offic-
ial position-civil, military, religious,
naval or educational.

{.,-m, .' ,
Prince Wilhelm
eldest son and political heir of the
former crown prince of Germany, is
now a clerk in an exporting firm in
Hamburg. He is 18.
EDUCATIONALCLUB
LISTENSTO REED
Speeches, Music Feature Annual Ban-
quet of Combined
Clubs
COPELAND, SPEARMAN ON
LIST OF HONORED GUESTS
Prof. Thomas 11. Reed, of the polit-
ical science department, was the
principal speaker at the joint banquet
of the Men's and Women's Education-
al clubs held last evening in the large
Union dining room. His subject was1
"The Present Political Situation."
Professor Reed declared that polit-
ical parties in the United States have
lost their power as instruments for
the expression of public opinion, and
that they live now because they agree
to differ. He characterized them as
mere vote registering machines;
"they are like the snake that still
wiggles after it is dead until the sun
goes down." According to the speak-
er, however, the sun has not yet set.
The lesson that the teacher must
take from the present situation, said
the speaker, is that young people must
be taught in the schools to "think
hard and think straight on questions
of public policy," They must realize
that the greatest single agency for
good or evil is government, and that
that government rests upon the con-
sent of the governed.
Other speakers on the program in
cluded Prof. C. S. Berry, Mr. L. A
Butler, superintendents of schools in
Grand Rapids, Miss Frances Speaker
Sen. Roy S. Copeland, of New York
and Prof. C. Spearman, of the Uni
versity of London.
A telegram from Dean A. S. Whit-
ney brought his greetings. Several
musical numbers were furnished b
the Wolverine quartette, and by Mis
Margaret Krug and Miss Helen Van
Blois. Mr. Ernest Newland enter-
tained those present with dialect
stories.
GOVERNOR'S PETITION
ARS MAXIMUM NAMES
Lansing, Aug. 5. - Gov. Alex. J.
Groesbeck filed his nominating peti-
tion for governor with the secretary
of state today. His petition carried
the maximum number of 14,628. Each
county of the state being represented
Federal Judge Arthur J. Tuttle, of
Detroit, also completed the filing of
bis petition today, filing a sufficient
number of names to bring his total to
that demanded by the state law.
Nearly all of the 2,500 passenger
automobiles in Santo Domingo have
been imported since the opening of
permanent roads to the interior three
years ago,

RESIGNATION Of
WARREN ACCEPTED

PSYCHOLOGIST HAS
BIG CROWD AT TALK

Retiring Ambassador Not
With Wilson Policy
Mexico

Satisfied
in

Professor C. Spearman Lectures
"Individual Differences In"
Ability

on1

PRAISED FOR PART PLAYED
IN RESTORING RELATIONS
Washington, Aug. 5-(By A.P.)-
President Coolidge today accepted theE
formal resignation of Charles B. War-
ren as ambassador to Mexico.t
In a statement accompanying his
.resignation which was made publicl
at the White House with the Mr. Cool-
idge's letter of acceptance Mr. War-
ren criticized the Wilson policy in.
Mexico and declared American pro-
perty and rights would be protected
there under the new relations between
the new nations.t
President Coolidge praised Ambas-
sador Warren's part in restoring dip-
lomatic relations with Mexico and de-z
clared the envoy represented at all1
times the fundamental desire of our1
country to see such conditions estab-
lished that we could assist in the de-
velopment of their country and theE
promotion of the welfare of their peo-
ple."
"Your mission to Mexico," the pres-
ident said, "has been attended with the
most gratifying success. You have1
solved many of the perplexing prob-
lems and especially have provided for
the protection of American property
and the settlement of disputed claims.",
President Coolidge is expected to
name a successor as soon .as the nec-
essary exchange of diplomatic for-
malities in connection with such a
procedure can be carried out with
Mexico. It is understood the new am-
bassador will be chosen from outside
the present diplomatic corps.
GO.O.P. CAMPIN PLANS
WAIT FOR DAVIS SPEECH
Washington, Aug. 5.-(By A.P.)-
Completion of the campaign plans of
the Republican party will await the
acceptance speeches of President Coo-
lidge and John W. Davis, the Demo-
cratic nominee. Party eaders here
say they will not regard the campaign
as definitely under way until they have
an opportunity to assess the recep-
tion of the speeches by the opposition
and the public.
All members of the national com-
mittee are expected to be here for the

W(IPPLE GIVES ACCOi;NT
OF SPEAKER'S STUDIES
An unusually large audience gath-
ered in the Natural Science auditor-
ium yesterday afternoon at 5 o'clock
to hear the lecture given by Profes-
sor C. Spearman, of the University of
London, England.
Dr. Whipple of the school of educa-
tion, introduced the speaker, giving
a iricf account of his studies in Ger-
many, his work in the World War,
ant a resume of his works as an au-
thor.
"Individual Differences in Ability"
was the subject of Professor Spear-
man's address. This subject might
be expressed as differences in intel-
lgence, the speaker thought. Psy-
chologists have never agreed on the
definition of this term, however. He
explained that in ancient times intel-
ligence meant the exercise of the fac-
uties of intellect, such as sense, im-
agination, memory, and attention, and
showed how the measurements of In-
telligence now are merely measure-
ments of the faculties. A classifica-
tion of these measurements implies
correlation, Professor Spearman de-
clared, but the correlation Is never
perfect. Ability may be judged by a
calculation of the basis of the classi-
fication.
WILL BURY TOWNSEND
THURSDAYIN JACKSON
Jackson, Mich., Aug. 5.--Funeral
services for Charles E. Townsend,
former United States Senator, who
died suddenly Sunday night, will be
held Thursday afternoon in this city,
it was announced last night.
The funeral services will be in,
charge of the Knights Templar, of
which Senator Townsend was a mem-
her for many years, and will be held
at the home of Mr. Townsend's mo-
ther-in-law, Mrs. E. S. Loomis, start-
ing at 1 p. m. and at the Universalist
Church in Concord, at 3 p. in. Bur-
ial will be in Concord, Mr. Townsend's
boyhood home.
Many messages of sympathy were

Admiral Sir Charles Edward Madden
second in command of the British
grand fleet since 1917, has been elev-
ated to the highest post in the Brit-
I ish navy, that of commander-in-chief.
Michigan Places
Sixth In Summer,
S chool Standing
Michigan stands sixth from the top
in the enrollment in the 1924 Sum-;
mer session according to figures is-t
sued by Dean Edward H. Kraus, of the
Summer session.
Reports from 26 of the leading
schools of the country 'show that
Columbia leads with a total enroll-
ment of 12,900, an increase of 225r
over that of last year. The schools
next highest inenrollment are Cali-
fornia with 5,215, Chicago 5,207, Wis-
consin, 4,634, Minnesota, 3,380, and1
Michigan with 3,15. Iowa Texas Ne- ~
braska Ohio, and Colorado come next
on the list.
New York has the greatest increase1
in enrollment, having 500 more en-
rolled than in 1923. Iowa follows with
468, Nebraska with 400, Columbia with
225, Missouri with 240, and Cornell
with 211. Michigan is rather far down
on this list, reporting an increase of
only 87.s
Only four schools on the list have
a decrease in enrollment. These are
Californiaswith a decrease of 935, Vir-
ginia with 125, Indiana with 99, and
Oklahoma with 80 less than in 1923.
COMMITTEE GIVES wAy
TO CONSERVE ON POWER
If the increasing electrical power
demands of the Northeastern area of
the United States are to be supplied
on an economical and adequate basis,
It will necessitate the extension of in- i
terconnections between the different
systems, the building of large, cen-
tralized steam-electric plants located
at strategic points, and the develope-
ment of large hydro-electric projects,
according to the conclusion reached
in the report of the engineering sub-
committee of the Northeast Superpo-
wer Committee made public at the
Department of Commerce. Herbert
Hoover is chairman of this Commit-
tee.
These recommendations, in the
Committee's opinion, will mean the
saving of over 50,000,000 tons of coal
every year; production of power at
less cost; security in power supplies
against interruption with its losses
through disturbed production and un-
employment; larger reserves of power
through which other industrial de-
velopment need not lag, awaiting pow-
er construction; electrification of
transportation with increase in its ef-
ficiency; extension of power uses to
the farm and saving of human ef-
fort.
The present report is an outgrowth
of a conference held in New York
'City last October between Secretary
Hoover and the chairman of the State
Utilities Commission of the eleven
Northeastern states.

GERMAN DELAES
JOIN CONFERENCE
ON REPARATIONS
MACDONALD GIVES MARX PRO-
GRAM FOR PUTTING DAWES
PLAN INTO EFFECT
HOPES FRIDAY NIGHT
WILL END CONFERENCE
Germans Want to Find Best Method
For Using Plan Without
Alteration
London, Aug. 5-(By A.P.)-Pre-
mier MacDonald, presiding at a plen-
ary session of the interalhied confer-
ence at noon today, formally handed
to the German delegation the proto-
col embodying the program of the
conference for putting the Dawes re-
paration report into effect.
He asked the Germans to study the
report and be ready to express their
opinions tomorrow.
The premier said he wanted to
bring the conference to an end by
Friday night. The session which was
held at the premier's official residence
in Downing street, lasted only 30 min-
utes and was opened by a welcoming
address delivered by Mr. MacDonald.
The German delegates headed by
Chancelor Marx, foreign Minister
Stresemann and Finance Minister Lu-
ther, arrived in London at 8:30 a. m.,
fully prepared for the meeting having
familiarized themselves with the ac-
tion of the conference committees
while en route from Berlin. They
were accompanied from Harwich by
Premier Gustav St. Hamer, the Ger-
man ambassador in London.
Replying to Mr. MacDonald's wel-
come Chancellor Marx said the Ger-
man government had accepted the
Dawes plan and was putting through
the necessary legislation to make it
effective. The German representatives
he said, hoped to maintain the friend-
ly spirit of the original experts and
hoped the allies would do the same.
Upon their arrival in London the
German delegates through their spok-
esman, Herr Spiecker, said they wish-
ed to assist in finding the best method
of putting the Dawes report into ef-
fect without ateration and in the spir-
it of its author, and that they would
contribute their part to its loyal ful-
fillment.
Herr Spiecker expressed the hope
that the same spirit would be found
In London, in which event, he said,
there would be no difficulty in com-
ing to a speedy agreement.
The first meeting of the Germans
with the delegates of the inter-allied
conference was strictly formal, held
in an atmosphere of restrained cor-
diality.
GREAT BRITAIN UNABE
TO AGRE WITH RUSSIA
London, Aug. 5.-The negotiations
between the representatives of Great
Britain and Soviet Russia have brok-
en down and the projected treaty will
not be signed, it was announced this
morning by the foreign office.

The British and Russian delegations
were in session all night until 7:1C
o'clock this morning, the announce-
ment said, the Soviet representatives
were unable to accept the amendment
and concessions offered in regard to
article 14 of the draft treaty. No
agreement could be reached it was
stated and the negotiations broke
down.
TheAnglo-Russian conference in
London was convened on April 14,
following the recognition of the Soviet
regime by the labor government un-
der Premier MacDonald in fulfillment
of what was virtually a campaign
pledge. The purpose of the confer-
ence was to settle all the outstanding
claims betv~een the two countries,
some involving pre-war debts on the
part of Russia and others growing
out of the Soviet government's seiz-
ures under its nationalization policy,
of property belonging to British sub-
jects.

SWEDISH SHIP DOCKS AT
TOLEDO FOR FIRST TIME
Monroe, Mich., Aug. 5.-The steam-
ship Julius Holmblad from Obola,
Sweden, with a cargo of 1,300 tons
of pulp wood for the Consolidated Pa-
per Co. of Monroe, docked at Toledo
yesterday. This is the first time that
a steamship from Sweden has docked
at Toledo. It took the steamer 28 days
to make the trip. It came by way of
the St. Lawrence river and Welland
canal.
Hull, England, Aug. 5. --Lieut. Lo-
cateli, Italian aviator, attempting a
flight to polar regions, arrived from
Amsterdam, Holland.

formal notification exercises of Pres- received by Mrs. Townsend yesterday.
ident Coolidge to be held the night of They came from state officials, Repub-
Aug. 14. lican leaders throughout the country
Meanwhile, President Coolidge is de- and many who served with Mr. Town-
Voting as much attention as possible send during his 12 years as a mem-
to his speech of acceptance. Because ber of the United States Senate.
of this and the usual cabinet meeting Stores will be closed in Jackson
this morning his engagement list was during the funeral services.
kept down to a minimum. -- - ----
-- - -By use of a new aerial camera an
Chemnitz, the knit-goods center of Australian inventor claims he has
Germany, is receiving many orders taken photographs while flying at 126
for knitted scarfs in bright shades, miles an hour and also has snapped
but those of plain colors are losing 112 photographs in three minutes dur-
their popularity, Iing a flight.

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