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August 03, 1924 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-08-03

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PAGE TWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, AUGUST 3, 1924

._
r

-4P oumer
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SSUMMER SESSION
Published every morning except Monday
during the summer session.
Member of the Associated Preis. The As-
sociated Press is exclusively entitled to the1
,se for republication of all news dispatches
credited to it or not otherwise credited in-
this papeir and the local news published here-
Entered at the postoffice, Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $.50-.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building.
Communications, if signed as evidence of
good faith, will be published in The Summer
Daily at the discretion of the Editor. Un-
signed communications will receive no con-
sideration. The signature may be omitted in
ublication if desired by the writer. The
ummer Daily does not necessarily endorse
the sentiments expressed in the communica-
tions.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephones 9414 and 176-M
MANAGING EDITOR
ROBERT G. RAMSAY
News Editor...........Robert S. Mansfield
Chairman of the Editorial Board... .
............Andrew E. Propper
City Editor................Verena Moran
Night Editor...........Frederick K. Sparrow
Telegraph Editor..........Leslie S. Bennetts
Womens' Editor...........Gwendolyn Dew
STAFF MEMBERS
Louise Barley Marian Kolb
Rosalea Spaulding Wenley B. Krouser
Marion Walker J Albert Laansra
Dwight Coursey Marion Meyer
Marthat Chase Mary Margaret Miller
Wray A. Donaldson Matilda Rosenfeld
Genevad wing Dorothy Wall
Maryland E. Hartloff
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 96o
BUSINESS MANAGER
CLAYTON C. PURDY
Advertising Manager.......fliiel M. Rockwell
Copywriting Manager. N. oble D. Travis
Circulation Manager....... Lauren C. H-aight
Publication Manager.......C. Wells Christie
Account Manager.............Byron Parker
STAFF MEMBERS
Florence E. Morse Florence McComb
Charles L. Lewis Maryellen Brown
SUNDAY, AUGUST 3,-1924
Night Editor-WRAY A. DONALDSON

Will Hungary, Cramped By Foreign
Intervention, Pass From The
Lists Of Independent Nations

U
h.______

Text Books and Supplies

At the close of the Great War, the ioumania and Ji
ancient state of Hungary, which had a f1agrant injusti
been a kingdom under the old Dual
Monarchy, was declared an indepen- territor i-c
dent Republic and Count Michael tur to normatc-.
Karoliy was appointed provisional Hngary is one
presidnt. This government, how- ful nations in E
ever, lasted but a short while, and, are a cia1 i :an
with the aid of the Roumanian army, yars, siIrrounded
it was soon driven out. Bela Kun Indo-Evrnopean G
established a Soviet: regime, but this, isolatdd. This
too, was rather ill-fated, and after the her independence,
elapse of four months, Admiral von of her seizrd pos
Hogar vas elected "Protector of the did Ro mnira ,
Magyar Republic." Charles "the Suid- Czecim-Siovakia.
den," former emperor of Austria had igh~t soundirjg rn
several times endeavored to re-estab- and the [ o. il. I
lish himself as king of Hungary, but is a few hee:ieas I
had failed each time, andl died, an treaty is as am
exile in the island of Madeira. "war to nitdS wa'.
But the royalist movement was too Yet students of
strong, and in open defiance of the notice Lh shuil:
Jugo-Slav-Italian pact which guar- ents: What of
anteed that an Hapsburg should ever wick that was
again sit upon the throne of Hungary, what of the 1ol
Prince Otto, the youthful son of what finally of th
Charles was declared king, with Von telegaed t the1
Hlogar as regent during his minor- <erhap1 afte' a
ity. von Trertehe wa

1go-Slavia. This is
ce, n view of Mr.
nd tho sooner those
it ned in Hungary,
Paster cm ropie re-
O 1e most bcauti-f
urope ; her PeOli
1 of Mongolian Mag-
on all sides by
o]pa, bat is ent irely
ation thlen, d esorveci
a 111lie sum1 total
sessions as muiich a.s
Jr o-Slavin, and
it ce, despite the
'torie of Mr. Wilson
Lloyd Ci, nrge in IPar-
bai, the Versaiilles
Pl b mcombe as the
"
listory cannot U1
Sity 'f all such ov-
tine 'Trea Iy cf iRys_
(1 i'ni wr f Or'ee,
V Alitance miii l81,
he Trianon in 1919?
pronverial ash-heap!
1, thle hit e IIend sik
s not far from the
rather dogmatically,

it

-- d

{

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Read The Daily

- sBoth Stores
r"Classified" Columns

9

,..____
.. .,.
_

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,....

ST. PAUL'S
U TIERAN CHURCH
,r'!,,d andi West Huron Streets
C. A. BRA_1j R, Pastor
r1,3 . lberty St. 1006-R
):(o A. M. Preparatory service.
.:30 A. 1L. Holy Communion.
Sermon by the pastor:
ICH IST THE BREAD
O' LIF."I
10:3oA . M.Bible classes.
All services in the English lan-
ige

FOR BETTER ,

e

I

SUMMER FOOD
TUTTLE'S
LUNCH ROOM
Phone 150
.38 Maynard St. South of Maj
rnT

FOR QUALITY PRINTING
SEE
rousmJr Better impressions3
711 N. University Ave.
Up-stairs
PHONE 296-R
Across from the Campus

5

Hungary soon gave evidlence of hery

truth in stating,

political and social unrest, as every "war is the ony me ) y whi
nation has under similar circum- states may "ettie their grieran'es;"
stances, by religious and racial in- isaicrogk c a inky had (ause ftr say
tolerance; programs were inst itlited in g, "D)i spates mst noit be settled by
against the Jews, and such Croats, . . . . pail imeet:ry dtat" abut by
Slovenes, and other alien races as "Blood and Iron!"
resided in Hungary. This situation - umngairy's future is ditlicult to pre-
of unrest is one that the diplomatic dic. rs fronm t init erIeiie of tl-c
forces of Europe shall very soon be "o]d diimcy, sn maya atai the
forced to muster all their resources pasiion of tic most powerffu state in
to settle: It is a situation causc% scat tr ii iope, but ciamped by
by the over-enthusiasm at Versailles foreln iatervxntion, she may go the
of certain gentlemen to insure race i Wa 1 many a ir dcssor, and pt
freedom; the trouble is simply that ingloriously frm the lists of nde-
there are large parts of Hungary, and penditi stales. It remains in tile
still larger number of Hungarians in hands eof TLie and fate.

--- - - -- ~----~-
Be- as careful
ayour doctor
Do not neglect the slight-
est break of the skin.
Any wound, no matter
how slight, offers a breed-
ing place for Infectious
Germs.
Don't get Hysterical
ACTS
Do these few things!

SIDE

" . Yet so natural is man- !
kind to intolerance in whatevera
they really care about, thatI
religious freedom- has hardlyI
anywhere been practically real-
ized, except where religious A
indifference, which dislikes to T
have its peace disturbed by the- i
ological quarrels, has added its
weight to the scale.p
In the minds of almost all re-e
ligious persons, even in the mostt
tolerant countries, the duty of b
toleration is admitted with tac-a
it reserve.d
One person will hear with dis-
sent in matters of church gov-
ernment, but not of dogma. t
Another can tolerate everybody,f
short of a Papist, or a Unitar-9
ian; another, every one who be-J
lieve in reveajled religion; a _
few extend their charity a little
further, but stop at the belief
in a God and in a future state. E
Whereever the sentiment ofI
the majority is still genuine andI
intense, it is found to have abat- f
ed little of its claim to be t
to be obeyed."1
-JOHN STUART MILL.
WILL FATE MAKE A PRESIDENTI
The inexorable hand of fate which
has elevated four of the last eleven
vice-presidents to the highest office in
the land, may, by a new twist, make
a president of Charles W. Bryan,
Charles G. Dawes, or Burton K.1
Wheeler, the major vice-presidential
candidates.
Death has put into the White House
more than 36 per cent of the vice-
presidents in the last two generations,
none of whom were outstanding na-
tional figures when selected. This
year the advent of a third major
party into the political field, with the
possibility of a deadlock in the elec-
toral college, adds the by no means
demote chance that Dawes, Bryan
or Wheeler may be sworn in as presi-
dent of the United States on March 4,
1925.
If 14 Follette wins enough states
to prevent either the Democratic or
Republican parties from ;getting a
majority of votes in the electoral
college, the election will be thrown
into Congress.
The constitution provides that the
House shall then meet and elect a
president. But the present even dis-
tribution of party strength in the
House makes it extremely uncertain
that the Lower House could elect a
president, so that it would be up to
the Senate to make the choice by bal-
loting on the vice-presidential can-
didates.
Death has suddenly elevated six
vice-presidents to president. The first
was John Tylor,who succeeded Wil-
liam Henry Harrison on April 4, 1841,
just one month after Harrison took

office. Zachary Taylor died in 1850,
a year after he became president,
and Millard Fillmore succeeded him.
Since 1860 four presidents have died,
in office, Lincoln, Garfield, McKinley
and Harding, automatically elevating
Andrew Johnson, Chester Arthur,
Theodore Roosevelt and Calvin Cool-
idge to office.
Thus it can be seen that the vice-
president is not so unimportant aft-
er all, and that the running mate of
the successful candidate in November
has better than 35 per cent chance,
according to averages, to be presi-
dent.
The Presidents of the United States
are not as long lived as they used to
be. The average age at death of the
first ten Presidents-Washington to
Tyler-was 78 years, while the aver-
age of death of the last ten Presidents
-Grant to Harding, exclusive of Taft
who is still living-was only 62 years.
A President nowadays may have a life
expectancy of only about 62 years,'
which is 16 years less than he would
have had a century ago. This while
the life-span of the average citizen,
due to bettered personal hygiene, im-
proved public sanitation and the
change in the cultural attitude toward
old age, has increased.
Of the presidential candidates,
Coolidge is 52, Davis is 51 and LaFol-
lette is 69, so only the former two
could complete a term in the White
House within the expectancy of a
president. However this need not
cause Mr. LaFollette any additional
worry since it is a well known fact
that while figures cannot lie, liars can
often figure.
TuE GERMAN VIEWPOINT ON THE
DAWES PLAN
Hermann Mueller, leader of the So-
cial Democrat party in Germany, has
recently declared himself as favoring
in no small measure, the Dawes Rep-
aration Plan. In an interview, Herr
Mueller is quoted as stating, "The
Dawes report has bridged the way to
European peace. At last have men
of economic common sense had op-
portunity to lay the foundations o
the reparations solution.
"All that was necessary was tha
the politicians should accept withou
reservations. Difficulties threatene
from both the German and the French
side. In France through the election
and the fall of Poincare, the adven
turer of the Ruhr, the exponets o
peace have conquered.
"The Socialists, to prevent a Righ
government, decided to support a,
burgeois coalition so that the Dawe
report could be hastened into prae
tice. The Deutsch National have los
the confidence of the people. I na
elections are called the experts' re
port will be accepted by the Germa
people with an overwhelming major
ity. Because of the famine of credit
and the consequent growing unem
ployment the German people have n

time to lose.
"When Gerimn indust r Ibecomes^=
normal once more a p~rope a
caltion of the 1w's report will save
Iea, a y from farther polities of
violence ft-sm Prance. Without the
(hangar of belang invsolved in time po0~-
~tica I uarrelt'S ot tEuropo, Amorica ean
he00 ecunoically to heal Euriope of
its war wonds for the benefit of ha-
,anitly at large.'
If we were lo ju4se by e themoi s
Ihere arc onil I no tN-ta of men, io,
I le s-iiel\ and t le mock.
KNTOW T1 E CAMPUS
- 1
Ii W Li AT TM U.N IVEISITiY
Thei, first minnctal orgamnat ion at the
ihiXvcisity of Alielig-in wxas formed in
1846 at whiicht ltme tile flote was t e
most popular of instrments; this was
innte the ftrst vat1 tilu lb ha I been in-
sat ied l ] Fi(t1cr M arsh, of the
lirst (-_a:s to be aOat d Irm here.
in 1844.
When Professor Frieze enme here
to play the organ in one of the local
churehes b (lid all in lis power to
foster music. Of course many ephe-
mudral musical organizations sprang
up from time to tinie begiing i
1859 with a nine-piece orchestra
club, "Les Sans Soci." hey soon
hanged their name to the "Amatetur
M usical Cl b..
In 1867 tIe irst University Glee
club was organized, and three yea-rs
later the eight men, then in their
senior yearm, gave 26 most suecessfcl
concerts throughout the state. Tle!
first extended trip in 1890, took in
lalisoii, tin.:ias, St. Paul, and
Chicago. Six years later the bays
went as far as Salt Lake City.
The UiVersity hand first came into
Sits own in 195. Ten years ago the
Regents mate an apprpriation for it
so that 1w it is one of the most
crcditabl college hands in any Amer-
- ican unrsti .
f The University Musical society and
the Choral UIon were founded in
t 1879-1880, and through them the May!
t Festival started its well known car-
eer, in 189. Ann Arbor ianks as
one of the iusi ((ters of thie coun-
s try.

.Y

We are offering for the first time an excellent 6
room house on one of the best streets in the West
Side.
First Floor-Reception hall, living room (15x26)
with fireplace; built-in bookcases, closet with mir-
ror in door; dining room (13x15); convenient kit-
chien. Floors and finish oak.
Second Floor-3 nice sized bedrooms with large
closets off each; built-in bath with shower attach-
muents; oak floors.
Extra toilet in basement; laundry tubs; hot water
heat; corner lot; garage. Owner leaving town.
Priced to sell.
Call MR. CORLEY with
Chas L. Brooks
Realtor

I

1.
Apply
wound.
wound.

1

Iodine to the
Do not wash the

I

215 First Nat'l Bank Bldg.

2.
Apply a sterile piece of
Gauze and wrap with ster-
ile ibandage, fasten with
Adhesive, after which you
M:y feel that you have
r edwisely.
If tle wound should have
been severe or deep, after
having done the above, go
at once to your physician
and let him advise you
further.
These dressings are al-
ways on hand
at
G, Claude Drake's
Drug and Prescription
Store
Cor. North Univ. Ave.
and State St.
Phone 308
"the Quarry"

Phones 315-3552

Evenings 1415-W

I

r

If you want a real good gasoline,
ask for
Wh Ite Star
At 1he following stations in the city and in the county:
HUNTER'S GASOLINE STATION
Liberty at First
ANN ARBOR BUICK ABBOTT GASOLINE CO.
Huron and Ashley Sts. Maynard at William
RED TOP TAXICAB CO. FRANK STAHL GARAGE
515 East Liberty St. Dexter
S. A. ELSIFOR ABBOTT GASOLINE CO.
117 N. First St.
HERTLER BROS. WhItmore Lake
210 S. Ashley St. FLOYD ULOTH
Maynard at William Washtenaw Road

,

ppv

1

Nook

'. a-r . °-

DRUGS

KODAKS

AN APOLOGY
Owing to an error in the work
of son i b ci of the i ly, the
Prize Short St ors in yeater-
ed. u toyws h oof
Olaf, the C rat, who is one of
the most pronunent of the ris-
lug short story vriters on the
campus this summer.
TAMAN.

Calkim s-Fletcher Drug Company
THREE DEPENDABLE STORES
Electric
CURLEXCurling Iron 9Sc*
Guaranteed by the manufacturer
and by us.
Calkins-Fletcher Drug Company
324 S. State. Corner E. and S. University Aves. Corner S. State and Packard Sts.
CANDY SODA WATER

tt

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