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June 24, 1924 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-06-24

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THE WEATHER
CONTINUED FAIR
TODAY

94It

O'ummtr

t ri!3au

4:D a tl

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XV. No. 4

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, :TUESDAY, JUNE 24, 1924

PRICE FIVE CENTS

REGISTRATION

SLOW

FOR

SUMMER

DEMOCRATS OPEN
CONVENTION IN
NEW YORK TODAY
DELEGATES SHOW INDECISION
IN TONE OF CAUCUSES
HELD
MCADOO, SMITH LEADING
IN DELEGATE STRENGTH
Deadlock Looms As String Rivalry
Threatens Leaders' Places
On Ballot
New York, June 23.-(By A.P.)-
The Democratic national convention
will assemble in Madison square gar-
den at noon tomorrow with' its favor-
ite for presidency deadlocked.
In pledged delegates strength, Wi.
G. McAdoo stands well ahead of all
of his competitors. Governor Al Sith
the idol of the New York Democracy,
had developed a backing that will
put him in second place on the open-
ing ballot. Down the line will be
ranged a long list of others, whose
managers tonight were predicting tri-
umphantly that both of the leaders
would be eliminated in the end by the
better rivalry between them.
Smith-MacAdoo Rivalry Keen
Today there was a rallying of
strength in the camp of both Smith
and McAdoo that kindled enthusiasm
to a fever heat and kept the hotel
district of New York echoing with
cheers of marching delegates.
During the day most of the state
delegations held caucuses to compare
impressions and plan their part of the
big show. The tone of most of them
was one of uncertainty and specul-
ation, but it became increasingly ap-
parent that many who will have con-
vention votes are disposed to make
selections of their own after they have
fulfiled their instructions to casta
their ballot for this or that candidate1
on the officialroll call.
Should the deadlock be prolonged,1
the convention itself appears eter-
mined to take upon its own sho de st
the responsibility of picking a candi-
date, rather than continue the stalel
mate indefinitely by following blind-'
ly the advice of state conventions and
primaries.
30 Lits Receive
All "A" Grades
Thirty students in the college of,
Literature, Science and the Arts re-
ceived all A records in the second
semester of the last school session.t
This list includes five seniors, eightt
juniors, six sophomores, and elevene
freshmen.,
According to the honor point systemt
of the university every hour of A to
a student's credit gives him threet
honor points. It is necessary for a1
student to earn an equal number of3
honor points to the hours work heI
carries in order to graduate. Pasta
records in the registrar's office showr
that the majority of students in the
university receive C and B averages,'
only a few receiving A grades dueI
to the high standards in the Literary
college.
Those who received all A's thist
June are: Lloyd W. Bartlett, '27; Mad-
eline Bowes, '27; Philip Dow, '27;
Frederick S. Glover, '27; Clarence C._
Hostrup, '27; Francis R. Line, '27;
Samuel J. Lukens, '27; Joseph J.

Pickarski, '27; John B. Schravesande,
'27; James A. Sprowl, '27; Alexander
W. Winkler, '27; Hugh B. Carnes, '26;
Edwin J. Doty, '26; Eunice L. Eich-
horn, '26; Solomon Greenburg, '26;
Ivan H. Sims, '26; Frank H. Granito,
'25; Mary E. Hartinger, '25; Norman
B. Johnson, '25; George Kenigson,
'25; Clara B. Lau, '25; Walter C.
Menge, '25; Paul C. Samson, '25; Nellie
T. Thornton, '25; Frieda S. Diekhoff,
'24; Winifred Hobbs, '25; Gaudence
Megaro, '24; Evelyn W. Sommerfield,
'24; Frances Swain, '24.
Figures in the office of the Regist-
rar Arthur G. Hall also show that 206
students of the literary college of the
university have been told that they
need not return to school in the fall.

WHAT'S GOING ON
TUESDAY
5:00-Lecture-Australia, the Remote
Continent. (Illustrated). Prof. W.
H. Hobbs, Natural Science auditor-
ium.
7:00-Chorl Union rehearsal, School
of Music.
8:00-Lecture-, Public Health as a
Career. Mr. Homer N. Calver, Na-
tural Science auditorium.
WEDNESDAY
4:00- Assembly and reception for
students of the School of Educa-
tion and graduates specializing in
Education. Room 203, Tappan hall.
5:00-Educational motion pictures -
The Manufacture of Steel. Prof.
F. N. Menefee, Natural Science au-
ditorium.
8:00-Concert-Mrs. George B. Rhead,
pianist. Mr. James Hamilton, ten-
or, Hill auditorium.
THURSDAY
2:30-Excursion No. 1- Ann Arbor
and the campus. Meet on the Lib-
rary steps.
5:00-Lecture-The Japanese Colon-
ial Policy. Prof. J. R. Hayden, Na-
tural Science auditorium.
8:00- Educational motion pictures.
Natural Science auditorium.
ANNOUNCE NIAAR
FALLS EXCURSION
Hobbs To Head Party On Trip For
Earth Features Course
Instruction
WATER ROUTE TO BUFFALO
IS PLAN OF EXPEDITION
Plans are being formulated for the
annual Geology excursion to Niagara
Falls which is held during the Sum-
mer Session, according to Prof Wil-
liam H. Hobbs, head of the geology1
department, who will be in charge of
the trip. The expedition is primarily
a field trip to illustrate certain of the
lectures in Professor Hobbs' course
on Earth Features, but is oepn to
all students and their friends whoj
wish to go.
Leaving Ann Arbor Friday after-
noon, July 11, the party will go by
water from Detroit on one of the1
steamers of the Detroit and Cleve-]
land Navigation company to Buffalo,a
and from there to the falls by rail.
Two days will be spent at the falls1
and in the vicinity, the Gorge ride,
a trip on the "Maid of the Mist", and
the view of the night illumination of
the falls from Goat Island are includ-
ed in the plans for the expedition.1
Professor Hobbs stated that the es-
timated total expenses of the trip
would be $28. In the past, the party
taking the trip has totaled 50 mem-
bers and those who desire to go this
year are asked to consult Professor
Hobbs early in Order that reservations1
and complete arrangements may be
made will before the trip is to be held.
ThQ party will return to Ann Arbor
in time for classes on Monday, July
14. '
University of Illinois will lose 36
trackmen by graduation this season.
All branches of activities are more or t
less effected in the loss of stars.-

HEALTH SERVICE OPEN
The privilege of the University t
Health service will be extended a
to all students of the University t
Summer session. The Health
service is located at the corners q
of Washtenaw and Volland ave-
nues and will be open from 8 to c
12 o'clock daily except Sundays 1
and from 1 to 5 o'clock, Satur-
days and Sundays excepted. All a
students who care to take ad-
vantage of it are given free med- t
ical service.B
Physicians are available at all
times by calling the Health ser-
vice infirmary, University 186-M. I

SUMMER LECTURE
CURSE OPENED
3IN SCIENCE HALL
"CONTRIBUTION OF U. S. HEALTH
COUNCIL" IS TOPIC OF
TOBEY
HOBBS, CALVER WILL
SPEAK HERE TODAY
Sundwall Lectures on "Universitya
Public Health" in First of
Series
Mr. James M. Tobey, administrative
secretary of the National Health Coun-
cil, lectured last night at 8 o'clock
,in Natural Science auditorium on
"The Contribution of the National
Health Council to Public Health."
He defined the organization which
he represents as the centralizing
force for efficiency and service of 12
voluntarynational health agencies to-
gether with two government agencies.
the United States Public Health ser-
vice and the United States Children's
bureau.
Places Bills in Congress
Activities of most of the voluntary
agencies are based upon the fact, now
quite generally recognized, that the
principal causes of death in this coun-
try are preventable. Research and
clinical work is undertaken then along
pressing lines and the resutts gre giv-
en over to government bureaus as
bases for public health administration
'and policy.
During the last session of congress
the National Health council reported
on public health legislation in Wash-
ington; 10 out of 50 bills introduced
were passed. Lately the council has
published an authoritative set of 20
small books covering public health
questions from the popular standpoint.
It has also been engaged in promot-
ing the annual health examination to
protect and energize the individual
and to prevent organic diseases. The
real goal of the organization is to in-
crease the national average length of
life.
"Positive dynamic health and phys-
ical efficiency are the chief goals of
future public health," according to
Prof. John Sundawll, of the hygiene
and public health department, in his
lecture on "The University and Public
Health," at 5 o'clock yesterday in Na-'
tural Science auditorium.
Realizing that public health is the
foundation on which reposes the hap-
piness of a people and the power of a
country, over 200,000 dollars is being
spent annually for fellowships and
scholarships in this field. Many factors
have caused this increased interest in
physical welfare among which the
draft examinations alone bshowed the
deplorable conditions in existence.
Over one-third of the men examined
were found to be physically unfit.
Professor Sundwall emphasized the
part played by the university in the
leadership of this work. He pointed
out that the University is the most;
logical center' of public health as the
work must be placed on a properly
guided scientific basis,
Hobbs, Calver Speak Today r
Education along the lines of hygiene1
and public health in our higher insti-1
tutions of learning will not be limited'
to those who anticipate public health
as a career, accardong to Professor'

Sundwall. Emphasis is being placed
on this subject in all programs of
study which are designed for the
training of men and women for service
and leadership in the various institu-
tions of society.
Tomorraw's lectures include an 11-
lustrated talk on "Australia, "the Re-
mote Continent," by Prof, W. H. Hobbs
of the geology department, and "Pub-
lic Health as a Career," by H. N. Cal-
ver, of the American Public Health
association. Both lectures will be
held in Natural Science auditorium,
the former at 5 o'clock, and the latter
at 8 o'clock.
George Sisler, manager of the St.
Louis Browns, has been suspended for
his run-in with Umpire Holmes.

OLD MONUMENT
IS FIND OF PARTY
FROM UNWVERSITY
EMPEROR AUGUSTUS MEMORIAL
UNEARTHED BY PARTY
AT ANTIOCH
LETTERS IN LATIN 2,000
YEARS OLD DISCOVERED
Res Gestae of Augustus, Long Record
of His Achievements, Is
Recovered
The remains of an important monu-
ment on the site of Antioch of Pisidia
has been unearthed by the University
expedition under the direction of
Prof. Davis M. Robinson, working in
co-operation with Sir William Ram-
sey in Asia Minor, according to a for-
mal announcement of the university
made public yesterday. The find is
an imposing memorial of the Emper-
or Augustus, erected on an elevated
area which was approached by a
broad flight of steps.
So important is the find believed to
be that Prof. Robinson has asked the
immediate assignment to the expedi-
tion of an architect skilled in the re-
construction of ancient buildings.
Among the inscriptions found, the
report says, is a long letter in Latin
from a governor of Galatia which re-
fers to the area as the Tiberia Platea,
the names associating the spot with
that of Emperor Tiberius who suc-
ceeded Augustus as emperor of Rome
and reigned from 14 to 37 A.D.
Res Gestae Found
Another inscription gave the name
of the citizen who contributed funds
to pave the area.The name was ap-
parently in bronze letters, which had
been removed, but the outlines could
be made out from small holes in
which the letters were fastened.
Of the memorial of Augustus, both
architectural and sculptured frag-
ments remain, says the university re-
port. These are numerous portions
of cornices, arches and other parts
lying in confusion as they fell and
were gradually covered with earth.
The sculptures are partly in relief
and partly in the round. Among them
what seem to be captive pisidians are
of outstanding importance. There is
also a Nike and reliefs with Tritons,
and representations which seem to
symbolize some naval victory. i
Of not less importance, university
authorities believe, is the recovery of
203 fragments of a copy of the Res
Gestae of Augustus. This was the'
long record of his achievements which1
the Emperor himself composed and
had engraved on two tablets set up at
the entrance of his mausoleum at -
Rome. The tablets were destroyed1
but the inscription is known from a
copy cut on the walls of a temple at
Ancyra, the modern Angora. The
fragments discovered at Antioch are
sufficiently numerous to be of valuet
in restoring the original text, it ist
announced.
Robinson Follows Ramsay t
The cite of Antioch is the place vis-
ited by Paul and Barnabas and men-
tioned in the Bible in the 13th chap-
ter of Acts. Excavation was begun1
by Sir William Ramsay before the
war and taken over by the Universityt
of Michigan expedition when Ramsay

was obliged to leave the work.
The Michigan expedition includes,
in addition to Prof. Robinson, Enoch
E. Peterson, research fellow of the
University; a member of the faculty
of Luther College, in Iowa; George R.
Swain, in charge of photography, and
Hussein Shefik Feizy, an Ottoman
subject, in charge of surveying. From
100 to 150 native workmen are em-
ployed in the excavatin.£
STAFF MEETING
There will be a meeting of all 1
staff members and tryouts of
the Summer Michigap Daily ed-
itorial department at 5 o'clock
[ at the Press building. )

Heads University
Summer Session

Dean Edward H. Kraus
Head of regular Pharmacy school,
and Professor of Mineralogy who is
dean of the University Summer Ses-
sion.
FRESH AIR CAMP
OPENS THIRD YEAR
50 Ann Arbor Boys Leave For First
Ten Days of Outdoor Life at
New Camp
CAMP OPERATED BY S. C. A.,
ORGANIZATION OF CAMPUS
More than 50 boys left yesterday
morning from Ann Arbor under the di-
rection of Mr. Lewis G. Reimenn, '16,
,for the first ten days session of the
Student Christian association Fresh
Air camp in the Patterson Lake dis-
trict.
The camp is operated each summer
under the auspices of the Student
Christian association for the benefit
of the children of Detroit and other
large cities in the vicinity. Its activ-
ities include swimming, boating, fish-
ing, hiking, and other outdoor sports.
All events are under the direction of
.competent young men from the Uni
,versity. "
The camp aims to provide an excur-
lsion to the great outdoors for the
youth of the nearby cities. It also
.purposes to aid in stimulating the
creation of American ideals of char-
acter among its attendants.
It was first inaugurated in the year
1921 by Mr. Reimenn. Since that time
it has seen a phenomenal growth. Only
140 boys attended during the first
year, but preparations for 1,500 boys
and girls to be accommodated within
the next two or three years denotes
a great increase in attendance. It is
supported entirely by the Student
Christian association which is aided
by subscriptions from alumni and out-
side friends.
Previous to this year the camp has
had no definite site. But this year
the Student Christian association were
the recipients of a donation for a
camp site consisting of 170 acres of
the best camp grounds in Michigan.
Sixty acres of this plot is heavily
wooded and is surounded by land of
a rolling nature thickly dotted with
lakes.
All young men of the University in-
terested in acting as aids to Mr. Rei-
menn are requested to see him at once
at Lane hall.
JACK BLOTT REPORTS
TO CINCINNATI REDS
Jack Blott, captain of the Confer-
ence champion 1924 Varsity baseball
team, reported to the Cincinnati team
in the National league yesterday, hav-
ing signed with that team a few days
ago.
1 Blott goes to the big leagues after
three years of work on the Varsity
baseball and football . squads. He
was considered the best catcher in the
Western Conference during the past
season, being one of the leading bat-
ters of the Big Ten.

SCHOOL
21584 ENROLLED
LAST NIGHT AS
SESSION OPENS
MEDICAL, EDUCATION, GRADUATE
SCHOOLS SHOW INCREASE
OVER 1923
KRAUS PREDICTS NEW
RECORD THIS SUMMER
Physical Education School Larger
Than Ever Before; Expect
More Later
Figures for enrollment in the Sum-
mer session yesterday afternoon show-
ed a total of 2,584 up to date, accord-
ing to Dean Edward H. Kraus, of the
Summer session.
According to Dean Kraus, the reg-
istration has been slow this year due
to the fact that several Detroit schools
and other schools in the vicinity have
not closed as yet. He felt confident
however, that the enrollment figure
would reach the 3,250 mark before the
close of registration. This figure is
a slight increase over last year.
80 In Physicial Education
Increase in registration is most ap-
parent in the Medical school, Graduate
school and the School of Educatlof
Enrollment in the other schools of the
University is approximately the same
this year as in previous years. These
figures do not take into consideration
the students at the Biological station
or those in the second term of the
law schopl.
Eighty students have enrolled in
the school of physicial education and
athletic coaching. This figure is a
slight increase over the enrollment
at this time last year. Although this
department of the Summer session is
but in the third year of its existence,
its prominence in the field of com-
petitive athletics is already nation
wide.
Expect Record Enrollment
Fifty-two students have enrolled in
the courses in public health nursing.
This is an increase of 31 over the 21
students registered last ;year. The
public health summer schools are be-
ing conducted by the University og
Michigan, Columbia university, the
University of Iowa and the University
of California. These schools not only
offer an opportunity for intensive
study but for personal contacts with
persons engaged in the phases of mod-
ern public health work, according to
directors of the schedule.
The total enrollment in the Sum-
mer session last year was approxi-
mately 3,000. From present indica-
tions, the 1924 session will exceed
the enrollment of last year by at
least a few hundred students.
The'institute of government and pol-

itics which will be
national league of
July 21 to 26 this
doubt, draw more
University for a
courses are to be
school will be open

conducted by the
women voters,
summer will, no
students to the
short time. Six
offered and the
to any women in-

terested in the work.
Complete figures for the registration
in the various schools of the Univer-
sity will be published at a later date.
On July Fourth, Jack Dempsey will
have held the heavyweight boxing
crown for five years.
AT THE THEATERS
Screen-Today
Majestic- Constance Talmadge
in "The Goldfish"; Aesop
Fables; Cartoon; Comedy and
News.
Wuerth - Florence Vidor in
"Alice Adams"; H. C. Wit-
wers', "So This is Holly-
wood"; News.
Stage-This week
Garrick, Detroit - "What A
Wife"; Bonstelle Company.

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