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July 27, 1924 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-07-27

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PAGE TWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

sUNDAY, JUL 27 192

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER 01? THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SUvIMER SESSION
Published every morning except Monday
dining the summer session-.
Member of the As-sociated Press. The As-
sociated Press is exclusively entitled to the
'ise for republication of all news dispatches
credited to it or not otherwise credited in
this paper and the local news published here-
Eered atste postofficett i.n Arbor,
Subscription by carrier or mail, $i. o
Offie.: Ann Arbor Press Building.
Communications, it signied as evidence of
good faith) will be published in 'The Summer
Daily at the discretion of the Editor. Un-
signed conmnunicationis will rec7eive :0 COn'-
sidei ation. The signature may be ommeitd in
pub lication ii desired by the wrlter. Tle
Suniuer Daily doe9 not neCessahl endol se
the sentiments expressed in ide commuulca-
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephones 2414 and x76-M
MANAGING EDITOR
ROBERT G. RAMSAY
News Editor............Robert S. Mansfield
Chairman of the EditorialBoard..opr
City Editor...... ...........Verena Moran
NreEegaph Edtor......... ersi Senne ts
Womens' Editor.... ........Gwendolyn Dew
Louise BarleyTF MarB~ Iolb
Rosalea Spaulding Wenley B. Krouser
Marion Walker J. Albert Laansma
'Dwight Coursey Marion Meyer
W tA. CDonaldson Matilda Rosenfeldilr
Genev win g-atofDorothy Wall
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone g6o
BUSINESS MANAGER
CLAYTON C. PURDY
Advertising Manager.......Hiel M. Rockwell
Copywriting Manager...Noble D. Travis
Circulation Manager.......Lauren C. 1-aight
Accun Manager.......... ..Byron Parker
STAFF MEMBERS
Charle eL. Lewis Mryecen Brown
SUNDAY, JULY 27, 1924
Night Editor-ROBT. G. RAM SAY
There is no duty we so much I
underrate as the duty of being
happy. By being happy we sow
Ianonymous benefits upon the
world, which remain unknown
even to ourselves, or when they
are disclosed, surprise nobody
so much as the benefactor.
I do not wish to pay for tears I
anywhere but upon the stage;
but I am prepared to deal large-
ly -in the opposite commodity.
I. . . A happy man or woman is
better than a five-pound note.
He or she is a radiating focus
of good-will; and their entrance
into a room is as though an-
other candle had been lighted.
I-ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON.I
COMING HOXF TO ROOST
The crime of the Ruhr is coming
home to roost.
The deliberations at London have
reached what looks like an absolute
deadlock over the question of putting
the Dawes plan into practice. The
deadlock exists over the proposed
loan of $200,000,000 to Germany. The
greater part of this sum must come
from American investors and with-
out it the Dawes plan is useless.
Hence both bankers and the French
government, represented by M. Her-
riot, are anxious to see such a loan
made. But the bankers are concern-
ed in safeguarding those who may
buy German bonds and they wish to
forestall action prejudicial to the

bondholders' interests.
France, although she wants the
bankers to make the loan, also wants
to reserve the right to enter Germany
in the event of a default and do what
she once did in the Ruhr occupation.
What the bankers fear, recalling thai
France's incursion into the Ruhr was
a loss to all Europe, is that in case
Germany defaults on the reparation
payment, even though she pays the
interest on the loan, French creditors
will seek to enforce penalties upoxi
Germany. And they further state that
"if these take the form of territorial
seizure or the reoccupation of the
Ruhr, German economic unity will be
so diso'rganized that not only the out_-
standing new loans but other and ex-
tensive credits, sure to follow when
German recovery begins, will be ser-
iously Impaired."
M. Herriot, finding that the bank-
ers dislike the ambiguous nature of
the agreement, offered, In addition, to
have France pledge the safely of the
loan. The bankers refused to accept
this condition.
Perhaps the bankers recall that the
French government has made no at-
tempt to repay the several billion dol-
lar loan that the United States ad-
vanced during war operations, and so
hesitate to accept the French pledge
at the preseut time.

And thus two birds have returned
to roost uon the threshold of the
French government: the occupation of
the Ruhr, and French failure to at-
temnt a repayment of war time loans.
THE BURDEN OF TREATY MAKING
Constitutional revision of certain in-
situtions which once were consid-
ered fundamental to the constitution,
but which now are thought to have
become worn through many years of
use, or to be utterly useless, is be-
ing agitated during this presidential
campaign as it has not been in many
years previous.
There are those who would do
,away with the electoral college, an in-
tstitutdon, long sinle become thor-
oughly useless, but hanging on the
constitution and the government like
a vetigial limb, indeed, a remnant of
primitive forbears; there are those
who suggest that the doctrine of
judicial review be done away with,'
an institution which in Its importance
to our government is immeasurable.
Now along comes Mr. John W. Davis,
.the presidential nominee of the Dem-
ocracy, with thle suggestion that the
old idea of a two-thirds vote of the
senate being necessary to ratification,
of a treaty, be done away with, and
with it would disappear the possibil-
ity of another hold up of presidential
Demcratic paty fportfurther gory
under the sun.
Why treaty making should be plac-
ed in a category different from reg.-
ular legislation, is difficult to determ-
ine. Certainly, law making is as im-
portant fro mevery angle as the mak-
ing of a treaty. No other country
on the face of the earth has the same
trouble in making treaties as ours.
Perhaps the suggestion of the Dem_-
ocratic nominee, while it seems to
suggest a little of the pique of the
Democratic party at the treatment of
their own supreme bit of treaty mak-
ing at the hands of the senate with
the determination to forestall any
further possibilities of such action.
may render the treaty making func-
tions of this country a little easier of
undertaking.
FUTURISM
As a matter-of-fact Americans, in-
terested only in the drab existence of
commonplace ideas and experiences,
the populace of this country has long
been accused by its European brother
of an utter lack of imagination. Many
a great continental critic has held
that in order to be a true American,
.one must lose whatever vestiges of
hazy uncertainty he possesses if he is
-to achieve the great "American ideal'
-realism.
Realism has long dominated in our
field of art. Music has been lacking
the suggestion which motivated mast-
er composers of France and Russia,
ainting has had little signs of the
insiration of a Corot or a Hale. In
\llterature, realistic descritions have
been the authors greatest claim to
~permanent fame, in sculpture like-
wise. .
Now, however, the trend to futurism,
in painting and music .in particular,
promises to instill a bit of imagina-
tion into the very soul of the Ameri-
can. Without this ability to visualize
what is only suggested in the works,
life itself can mean nothing.
The lack of appreciation of things
'beautiful which is more evident among
the average group of Americans than
people of similar circumstances In
any other nation, can be traced di-
rectly to lack of experience in us-
ing the powers of the imagination.
All it requires is a bit of practice

and we shall find the American culti-
vating as fine a sense of the aesthe-
tic as his rival on the Qther side of the
Atlantic.
~KNOW THE CAMPUS
TILE ROCK OF 1862
Probably the most familiar memor-
ial is the huge rock situated at the
northwest corner of the diagonal. It
is a memorial of a different type, this
"Big Stone," and there is no danger
of its being overlooked. It was plac-
ed there by the Class of 1862 In
February of their senior year.
Some members of the class dis-
covered it in a garden below the old
Washtenaw county jail. Only what is
now the east front was then exposed.
Through the suggestion of Dr. Alex-
ander Winchell, sometime professor
of geology, the stone was brought to
its resting lace. The professor as-
sured his classes that it was carried
from the far north by a glacier.
A the boys were too poor to hire
the work done for them, they excav-.
ated the rock themselves and loaded
it on a sledge drawn by five teams of
horses. With flags flying they carried
it triumiphantly through the slushy

snow and deposited it in its present
advantageous position.
The rock weights over seven tons.
It Is composed of jasper conglomerate
and is considered a very fine speci-
men.

Tex .Books and Supplies

OATEDg/ge
ir- ':r"

GR AH A M'S

Both Stores

Yes, butte?! If you want your
rolls dry this morning you're out of
luck. We have decided to pwit but-
ter between them.
Yesterday a gent told us we were
no good. Now we aren't quite so
conceited as to think that we are
good, in fact, at the first of the sum-
mer we stated emphatically that we
are not good, but it gives us a trem-
endoiis pain when some people razz
our efforts and tell us they could do
better themselves, but when asked to
contribute or come up and run the
damn column, they back (lown. It is
the person of that sort who contrib-
utes most largely to the discontent
on the campus, and who never adds to
th tybetter things about the Univer-
All of which is out of place In a
humon column, but we really felt
constrained to say something. Throw
away your hammer-it's no good for
sawing wood.
DO YOU NEED ONE%
Dear- Taman:
Can't something be done to aleviate
the distress of the poor harassed dam-
sels of our campus? After reading
the first Campus Opinion in Thurs-
day Daily, I realized that I really
wasn't safe walking alone on the
campus. Can't I have a police escort?
Anxiously,
Marchieta.
APROPOS 01? RECENT EVENTS
Editor's Note--We reprint this from
The Michigan Daily of Friday, Jan.
24, 1924. It seems to be quite relev-
ant to our recent mess.)
M\en are brutal, beastly things,
I hate them, every one',
And through my pure and upright
Those horrid men I'll shun,
Somea have blue eyes and yellow
They're fickle, vain and crazy;
And some have eyes of deepest
brown-
They're flirts and dumb and lazy.
And so I hate the whole dumb mess
With no man will I go
To dance or show or anywhere
'Till I am asked, you know.
-The Good Samaritan.
,IE,
We have a profun objection to see-
ing upon the silversheet the word
Educational, followed by the line:
Thle Spice of the Program spelled out
surrounding the lamp of knowledge,
and then sitting through some dumb
comedy with no plot and less .intellig-
ence. Those who are not against us
are for us-let us stand united upon I
this platform: Change the name to
something more fitting like "Sloppy
Scenes, the Mess of the Program."
Men and women of Michigan-are
you with us? ,,,
PARIS, FRANCE.
TAMAN SUMMERMICHDAILY ANN-
ARBORMICH.-
SAW SIGN ON FRONT OF CAFE
'TODAY STOP .READING .MATTER
LIMITED TO FOUR WORDS STOP
TOASTED ROLLS SERVENT ICI
STOP HAVE YOU STARTED EX-
PORTING INTERROGATION.
TARI K.
Taman, Dear Sir:
wish you wouldn't run such help-
ful hints as the one which ran in
your col not long ago. It said: "When

in doubt, park." I was, and I did,
and I got a black eye. How do you
explain this?
Gerald.
Under such circumstances, Gerald,
we should advise you to explain that
you stumbled on some furniture.
WE APOLOGIZE -
THIS 18 THlE EM)
The office dumb bell just asked if
a dumb waiter was ever given an
intelligence test. We just can't write I
no more, that's all there is to it.
Today's Helpful Hint: To avoid

Typewriters
Fr Reto
OfSaen
Bu~siness College
State at William
Streets

FOR BETTER
SUMMER FOOD
TUTTLE'S
LUNCH ROOM
Phone 150
335 Maynard St. South of Maj

I

FOR QUALITY PRINTING
SEE
71 N. University Ave.
Up-stair.
PHONE 296-R
Across from the Campus

I

"I

DRUGS

KODAKS

Calkins.Fletcher Drug Co.
THREE DEPENDABL.E STORES

Two items of every-day use that
you bhould be using:

Colgate's
Tooth Paste

-25

Colgate's Rapid 3 c

Calkns-Fetcer Dug o.
THREE DEPENDABLE STORES

ii.

CANDY

SODA WATE R

- -
- -

Little Investment -- big returns,
the Daily Classifieds.--Adv.

A

Medicine
Ki fo

GREAT PREESAING M
3or of Ita dI h word y our ipnoeava lto
EASY MONTHLY PAYMENTS Ssmal ha
notie It while you enioythe ue of tieoder
TS Under our a t er
AMOEY IaesPan you can not onla for
your own typwiter, but earn cash besides. eSr

pman Ward
, Company
3248Shi ian uid
Ayes., Checago

Guarantee
Please send me
free boo1 o* I

Oh Henry
Dma neve thuhto-O en r"

Every one driving an auto
oul include in his equip-
mnent a small Emergency
The right dressing and
first aid remnedies on hand
at thle critical moment may
save much suffering if not

N*"""..-'...-.--... --....
St. and No.................
~ty.......''......

a life.

25c makes a starter.$10
buys a good outfit. $3.00,

a complete set.

at

Everhot fries, boils, broils, toasts, bakes, steams-
does all kinds of cooking. This two-burner
style with 3-temperature switch, - $16.50
Everhot electic stove is
bst fo summer cooking
pared on Everhot. Eac burner developsa
tremendous heat which is concentrated on
the cooking surface. Can be used wherever
there's an ordinary lamp socket within
reach. Convenient, economical.
TheDetroit Edison
Company

Drug and Preser ption
Store
Cor. Nerth Univ. Ave.
aii Stufa t.8
"The Quarry"

Main at William

Telephone 2300

pp

flunking a blue-book, bolt It.
Tanlase

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