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July 25, 1924 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1924-07-25

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C, 4 r

J'ummitrx

THE WEATHER
GENERALLY FAIR
TODAY

Ar
t

1
EmsR

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XV. No. 30

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JULY 25, 1924

PRICE FIVE CENTS

Attempts To Form TWELL TELLS OF

OLYPICGAMS OF
1924 DECLARED BY
FOUNDER SUCCESS
DEARON PIERRE DE COUBERCIN,
HEAD OF OLYMPIC COMMITTEF,
GIVES OPINION AT BANQUET
DECRIES CRITICISMS
THAT GAMES BE ENDED1
This Year's Games Mark New IHgh
Level of International
Athletic Achievement
Paris, July 24.-(By A. P.)-Dearon
Pierre de Coubercin, president of the
international Olympic committee, who
played so large a part In the modern
revival of the Olympic games, took oc-
casion in speaking tonight at a ban-
quet so offered to the organizer of the
games by the Swedish Olympic com-
mittee to reply to certain criticisms
that the games are a failure from ev-
ery standpoint and should be aband-
oned.
"Never since the renewal of the
Olympic games," he declared, "has
such success been achieved as this
year, not only from the sporting side
but also from the viewpoint of im-
provement in the states of mind of the
spectators."
Everyone will acknowledge that
athletics and other branches of sport
have never risen to such heights in the
history of the world. The athletes im-
bued with the spirit of safe and sane
rivalry, acted like gentlemen through-
out. As for the public, there was an
improvement; it was not quite so bad
as that of previous Olympic games.
Even our friends and enemies must
realize that in a crowd of thirty thou-
sand spectators, fifty hoodlums are suf-
ficient to create impudence."
The baron took occasion to criticise
hasty and ill-timed comment in the
press upon various incidents which
he characterized as unsufficient hap-
penings.
"The Olympic games," he added,
"have been a power for good since
their renewal in 1896. If I were con-
vinced that they bred discord and ani-
mosity between nations I would recom-
mend that they be abandoned, altho I
have spent thirty of my best years in
organizing their renewal. When the
present ridiculous campaign shall have
died a natural death, the Olympic
games will continue on scoring higher
chord perfection than ever entertain-
ed, as they factored in bringing about
general peace in the world and a
friendly feeling between the nations."
S. C.A AIR CAMP DRIE
SUCCESSFUL ON CMPUS
Three hundred and thirty-eight dol-
lars were subscribed by summer
school students Tuesday in the S. C.
A. drive for funds in support of the
Fresh Air camp af Patterson lake.
The drive was the most successful
of any put on in the summer term by
the S. C. A. Last year, only $264
were netted as a result of the sale of
the tags. Officials in charge of the
drive express themselves as heartily
pleased with the results of the cam-
paign.
The money raised will go to the
support of the University Fresh Air
camp at Patterson lake, where 500

poor boys of the state are every year
given a vacation under the auspicef
of the Student Christian association.
MARKET FOR ART WORKS
VERY LOW IN GERMANY
Works of art in Germany are about
as cheap as anything purchasable
there.. Recent auctions in Berlin
have demonstrated the fact that some
of the works of artists of repute have
sold for ridiculously low prices. At
an auction conducted by one of the
largest .dealers in work of art in the
country, the firm went to the expense
of reproducing several of the prin-
cipal works of modern masters offer-
ed for sale. Even here an oil paint-
ing by Ludwig van Hoffman brought
only 50 marks.

Looms As Premier
As Fascist Rule
Weakens In Italy

Hanford Talks On Study And
Cultural Value Of Literature

Attet To Fec!SOrm ELSO
Cabinet In Greece
MONITOR PLAN FOR
- WORLD WIDE PEACE

Of particular interest to teachers of
literature as well as to all others who
heard him was the lecture given in the
Natural Science auditorium yesterday
at five o'clock by Professor Hanford
of the English department. The title
)f the lecture was "The Study of Lit-
era ture." It bears this title ratherl
than "The Teaching of Literature" be-j
cause Prof. Hanford holds that all good
Leachers of literature are first of all
students.
According to the speaker no one can
successfully substitute a knowledge of
pedagogy no matter how necessary
that may be to teaching, for a thor-
ough knowledge of the subject mat-
ter. He cannot successfully make a

little go a long way without feeling
that he is perpetrating a fraud upon
the public.
Prof. Hanford viewed literature from
the- standpoint of its cultural value in
his lecture. It is a desecration of lit-
'rature to be told to read fifteen min-
utes a day in order to increase one's
earning capacity.
Relaxation is one of the main aims
of literature but the average reader is
too liable to choose the "male-cinder-
ella" type of story in which there is
very little profit until the reader learns
O view the subject objectively.
Another use of literature is for the
extension of experience. It is here
'hat the careful reader gains most.,

-Although Mussolini still clings to
his power, his downfall as dictator
of Italy is considered imminent and
it is reported from Rome that the
ex-premier, Giovanni Giolitti, will
soon be asked to form a new cabinet.
DEAN PAKER TO
ADDRESS INITIATES
Nine Educators Enter Michigan Chap.-
ter of National Honorary
Fraternity
BANQUET AT UNION WILL
CONCLUDE CEREMONIES1
Prof. P. C. Packer, dean of the school
of education of the university of Iowa,
will deliver the principal address at
the Phi Delta Kappa banquet following
the initiation to be held this after-
noon at 4 o'clock. The banquet will
take place at the Union, with Mr.
Forest Averill, principal of the high.
school at Greenville, Michigan, presid-
ing as toastmaster.
Dr. Geo. E. Willett, principal of
township and consolidated schools at
La Grange, Illinois, will represent vis-
iting faculty of the summer session on
the program, and Mr. L. A. Butler,
superintendent of Grand Rapids
schools, will speak for field member
of the faculty. Mr. H. A. Hansen of
Milwaukee will welcome the initiates
on behalf of the active chapter.
Professor Packer has attend several
summer sessions at Michigan. His
studies have been concerned with
space requirements per pupil and have
resulted in the statement of definite
formulae which are now in use by
superintendents and planners of school
buildings. He has recently given his
doctor's dissertation at Columbia. This
afternoon he will address some of the
classes in education. Professor Pack-
er will go to Detroit from here for
conferences with public school author-
ities.
At present the Ann Arbor chapter of
Phi Delta Kappa has 111 active mem-
bers, morethan half of whom are ex-
pected at the initiation and banquet.
Prof. T. E. Rankin, Prof. A. E. Wood,
and Prof. W. R. Humphreys have been
invited as guests of honor, and several
out of town members of the fraternity
have accepted invitations to come.
The next meeting of the chapter will
be the annual picnic to be held this
year at Whitmore Lake. The date has
not been announced.
Those who will be initiated this af-
ternoon are Robert Ward, of Otsego;
W. E. Olds, of Escanaba; John Dal-
ymple, of Fenton; E. H. Chapelle, of
Charlotte; Philip Lovejoy, of Mount
Clemens; William Cain, of Kalamazoo;
Lloyd Smith, of Ionia; Edward Courn-
yer, of Berrien Springs; and J. J.
Schafer, of Midland.
Mr. Manly E. Erwin is president of
the Michigan chapter.
You an tell how big a man feels by
the scorn he exhibits when asked to
be vice-president.-Jersey Journal.
People are sitting on their porches
to see who goes riding to see who
sits on their porches.I

NEW BUSINESS AD
SCHOOL TO OPEN
bepartiment Established) Since 1S90
To Form New School at
University
TO GRANT M.B.A. DEGREE
AT END OF TWO YEARS STUDY
The School of Business Administra-
tion, which was authorized by the
Board of Rgents on Dec. 20, 1923, willt
open for its first academic year on1
Sept. 16, with the registration of stu-
dents. Eight different programs of
study will be offered by the faculty,
which will include six professors, two
lecturers and four instructors. Ed-
mund S. Day will be the dean of thet
new school and Carolyn E. Allen will1
be secretary to him.
The School of Business Administra-
tion is an outgrowth of instructio
in business administration given in,
the Literary college since the yearl
1889-90 and with the large growth in
business courses, the Board of Regents
voted last year to establish a new1
school.
The school will grant only one de-
gree, the M. B. A., Master of Businesst
Administration, to those that complete;
satisfactorily the courses prescribed.
This completion of the work required1
will usually require two years of
resident study.
Students seeking to enter the new
school fron either the Literary col-
lege, or Colleges of Engineering and
Architecture, may do so providing that
they have completed certain courses
that have been set as prequisite. Stu-
dents may secure both the A.B. and
M.B.A. degrees providing that they
take five years, the first three in the
Literary college and the second two
years in the new School of Business
Administration.
To supplement the regular acad-
emic courses in the school, a business
research bureau will be establishe
at the beginning of the academic
term, and new industrial and business
problems will be able to be worked
out. One of the aims of this bureau
will be 4o keep the school in close
touch with the current financial,
commercial and industrial life of the
country.
TUESDAYWILL BE GAL
DAY FOR MEN'S ED CLUB
Tuesday afternoon and evening of
next week will be devoted to all-ed-
ucational activities by faculty and
students of the School of Education,
according to plans now under way.
Mr. A. A. Rather, chairman of the
committee of the Men's Educational
club, is in charge of arrangements.
Several educators from about the
state will be the guests of the club
for the day.
At 3 o'clock the men will meet
Coach G. E. Little on Ferry field, and
he will conduct them on an hour's
tour through the Yost field house.
The faculty-superintndent baseball
game is to be played at 4 o'clock.
Following the game, there will be a
hot-dog supper on the field.
The annual initiation into the order
of the Yellow Dog will conclude the
I evening.

Ill~um~inatedl

Plates Dating From Ninth
Century in
Collection

LIBRARY EXHIBIT-
S HOWS RRE IPLATES

The task of forming a new cabinetj
has been given M. Cafantris, leader of
the Progressive Liberals in Greece.
The Papanastasiou government quit
following a vote of non-confidence,
LORCH TO SPEAK ON
ARCHITECTS TODAY1
Will Tell of Work of Some Americans,
As Richard Hunt, McKinney,
in Architectural Field
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE TO
HAVE LAW BUILDING CASTS

LEAGUE OF NATIONS ADOPTS
PLANS FORMULATED BY AN
UNOFFICIAL COMMISSION
OUTLINES AMERICAN
PLANS FOR PEACE
Declares ills Faith in the Higher Con-
science of Man to Settle
Armament Difficulty
By Rosalea Spaulding
Endorsing the Monitor peace plah
and declaring his belief in a higher
conscience by which men will think
through the disarmament question,
Prof. J. T. Shotwell, of Columbia un-
iversity addressed a large audience last
night in Natural Science auditorium in
an inspiring lecture on the proposed
world treaty for disarmament and se-
curity.
The speaker outlined, the work of
the League of Nations since 1920 when
the permanent commission on disarm-
ament was established, down through
the more recent plan covering a temp-
orary mixed commission of civilians
wind military experts to the present
development of a draft treaty unoffic-
ially written and presented to the
League by a small group of Americans.
Public Opinion Necessary
"Ways and means and technicalities
are the things that we have finally
gotten down to from the old broad
assertions df ethics in matters of dis-
armament and preparation for security
and peace," Professor Shotwell de-
clared. "We should take a larger de-
gree of vision and assure ourselves
that these problems are actually being

A. N. TODD COLLECTION IN
LOWER CORRIDOR OF LIBRARY
Facsimiles of illuminated plates of
4he Middle Ages from the A. M. Todd
collection are now on display in the
lower corridor of the library. These
plates date from the ninth to the six-
[eenth century, and show plainly an
increasing elaborateness of style. They

are arranged in chronological order. .ErtI
There is a plate from the Corona- Prof. Emil Lorch of the School of
tion -Book of the Anglo-Saxon kings Architecture will lecture tonight on
of England, specimens from the gos- "Some American Architects and Their
pels upon which the kings took their Work," in Natural Science auditorium
coronation oaths from the time of Ath-Iat 8 o'clock. The lecture will be il-
01l n q T i a tirifi h rn+

eisian. h'ris manuscript is tie work l
of the ninth century. Next domes a
,late from a twelfth century Bible, and
from a psalter of the 13th century, one
C the most elaborate manuscripts ofI
the era. The plate from the "Great1
Hours" of Jean Due de Berri, is one
of the finest examples of Gothic art.
Other plates in the collection are
taken from the Bible of Pope Clement
seventh, executed between 1378-94,
"Les Merveilles Du Monds" executed
between 1404-19, the Gospels written
2ntirely in gold letters, and the Prayer<
:ook of Louis, Fourteenth.
COOLEY IS SATISFIED
WITH DEMOCRA9TIC CHOICE
Returning recently from Philadel-
phia where he had gone after the
close of the Democratic convention
in New ork City, Dean M. E. Cooley,
of the Colleges of Engineering and
Architeure, and candidate for U. S.
senator in the coining election, ex-
pressed himself as well satisfied with
the choice made for the Democratic
sstandard bearers in the coming cam-1
paign. He said that the party had
nominated for its presidential can-
didate one of the greatest DemocraticI
men in the last generation.I
Dean Cooley attended the conven-
tion in New York because as he ex-
pressed it," for an educational course
in politics for one who was a novice,"
and now he says that he knows a
great deal more about politics.
After the convention, Dean Cooleyl
went to Philadelphia to recuperate
from the effects of the meeting. Thb
brilli at Kleig lights, the continued
shouting, the noise and the heat gavej
many of the delagtes sore throats,'
sore eyes and headaches, many of the
delegates also having attacks of
colds.
Asked as to what his campaign
plans were, eDan Cooley said that his
campaign had been originally plan-
ned to start on July 14, but due to
his visit in Philadelphia, this had to
be abandoned. No definite plans will
be made till the arrival in Detroit of
the State Democratic chairman and
then his plans will be known. He
plans, however, to spend the first part
of his campaign in the southern coun-
ties, and then arter a rest to cam-
paign in the northern counties and
the Upper Peninsula. Dean Cooley
expects to visit every county in the
state before the final election.

lustrated and will treat of those men faced by an intelligent electorate. The
who have made architectural history, vitalizing force behind plans now com-
s s hd . ,g. before this and other nations is an
such as Richard M. Hunt, C. F. Me-!c- i pbi pnon hthsbe
.tive public opiion; that has been
Kinney, Bertram Goodhue and others. evolved and so long as it continues to
Professor Lorch states that since the ;row, we can assure ourselves of a
ivil war, there has been a great definite solution of the question."
change in methods of construction and j British and French authorities have
ize of buildings. Formerly, wood and kor the past three years found it in-
,rick and stone were used and now creasingly impossible to formulate

steel and concrete are used almost;
Ex clusively, and buildings are tall in-t
.tead of low. This created a corre-
sponding novelty in the problem of
Ocsign of railroad stations, banks, of-
rice buildings, country homes and city
mansions.
America's architecture is mostly bor-I
rowed. It takes centuries for origin-1
ality to be developed in a new coun-
try but a selection of the best has been
made, so that European countries, to-.
day agree that American architecture
s 'the foremost in the world.
The School of Architecture is to
have the plaster casts used for the new
law building. These are decorative,
surely Gothic carvings.
PROIF. REED DISCUSSES
U. S. NOMINATING MEETING
"Political parties are inevitable,
and it is hard to differenciate between
them. The Democrates themselves
believe the principles laid down by
the Republican party," asserted Pro-1
fessor T. H. Reed, addressing the
Thursday afternoon session of the In-
stitute of Government and Politics.
The speaker went into a discussion
of the nominating methods. hAccord-
ing to Professor Reed, the primary
system gives us the better man. Cal-
ifornia is under this system and the
quality of the candidates has improv-
ed considerably. The convention sys-1
tem does not furnish the voters with
any information about the candi-
dates. In defense of this system he
lared that there is an advantage in
using the convention plan, a party
iachine, in that the delegates can get
together and compromise on a can-
didate, which could not be done at the
polls.
People should go slow with their
marrying. It may be their last wed-
ding for several years.,
Never marry a man who smokes cig-
arets and throws ashes on the floor
for you to sweep up.

Bi ans of peace preservation acceptable
to both.
"They have been waiting, and still
are waiting, pathetically, for Ameri-
can leadership," stated the professor.
Do Not Know Insecurity
Lord Robert Cecil has been accused
by the continental peoples of enter-
taining mere principles of idealism,
while only automatic, general, and per-
manent detailed methods of providing
.ecurity can satisfy those nations
whose territory is threatened.
"We in America do not know what
insecurity is, and not knowing, we are
not sympathetic," said Professor Shot-
well. "The French say that a disarm-
ament treaty-and soforth must first
be a security treaty; they are right.
The American plan, which has been
adopted by the League as an bfficial
document, recognized the primacy of
security in any mechanism for dis-
armament."
Drawn by Americans
The treaty as drawn up by the
group of Americans, including Gener-
al Bliss and Professor Shotwell,
would not provide for any two dis-
pensations of war and peace as inter-
national law in the past has done.
Simply, the aggressor would convict
himself by failure to appear before
the court established; all other na-
tions might, or might not, treat that
nation as an outlaw. The treaty would
constitute enforcement of the treaty
since it is aimed directly at stability
of currency and payment of repara-
tions on a scale to be determined by
the injured party.
"The nations have been disappIint-
ed; the opportunity is still open. By
the end of this year the League will
be keeping the peace in central Eu-
rope; its metpods must be extended
to keep the peace throughout the
world. We cannot impose security
and disarmament by fiat; treaties
probably are the most effective in-
struments by which we can accom-
plish the purpose that the public has
set us."
When a bald man removes his hat
in an elevator, it isn't so much court-
'esy as heroism.-Birmingham News,

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