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July 21, 1923 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-07-21

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERTICE

,J

No. 25}

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JULY 21, 1923

PRICE FIVE

i

t

iY LECTURES
EXPEDITID N
TO NEAR EAST

Pillsbury
Oxford

Attends
conference

DDRESS GIVEN BY REQUEST OF
STUDENTS AND TOWNS-
PEOPLE
ARE MANUSCRIPTS
FOUND IN MOUNDS
ocuments Dated 250 B. C. Excavated
From Ancient Cities, Buried
For Centuries
Before an audienc which taxed the
pacity of Naturl Science auditor-
m last night, Professor F. W. Kel-
y spoke on "The University of
Ichigan Expedition to the Near East
19-20". It was originally announC-
. that the subject to his lecture
>uld be, "Why Has the Turk Come
ack?" but due to numerous requests
om both townspeople and Summer
hool students he changed to this
bject.
'searched for Manusripts
The purpose of the expedition was
ofold, Prof. Kelsey stated, first,
at of making a thorough investiga-
n is, those military campaigns of
e late war which took place in
gypt and Asia Minor, and second, to
nduct a search through this great
rritory to recover all written rec-
ds, manuscripts etc., which' were in
nger of getting destroyed if placed
improper hands.
Arriving in Egypt, the party at
ce began their search for written+
cords and manuscripts of all kinds.
are great mounds, which had cover-
portions or all of many of the +
dent Egyptian cities were exca-
ted during the war, the ground be-
g used for fertilizer. Some of these
tes have been covered by the sand
d dirt of the Nile for centuries and+
any will probably never be found,
LB Egyptian government even con-
ucted railroads into these locali-
s to carry the removed dirt away.
me of the mounds, Professor Keb-
y stated, were eight times the size
our campus and from 60 to 70 feet
height.
Uncover Ancient Buildings
rhe uncovering revealed a host of
eresting facts, both about the early
yptian architecture, and about the
ucational methods of these ancient+
ople. In one place a monastic li-+
ary was uncovered with many of its
cords and manuscripts still in a
od state of preservation. These
Mv been purchased from the Egypt-
n government by J. Piermont Mor-+
mn. In another place an ancient
rial ground was unearthed, reveal-
9 the bones of men who lived be-
re history began.
Among the most interesting things
hich were found there by the party
d which were carried back to this
untry were a school slate, and pap-
us parchment of many shapes and
es, bearing petitions, edicts, and
gal notices and the like. The school
ates showed plainly the old Egypt-
.n methods of teaching the Greek al-
tabet.
Yesterday's Games
American
Washington 12, Cleveland 5.
Athletics 9, St. Louis 6.
Boston 5, Chicago 4.

Prof. Walter D.mPillsbury, of the
psychology depatmiient, is in England
at the present time attending the Ox-
ford conference this month. At the
conference Professor Pilsbury will
read a paper which was written by Dr.
Charles H. Griffiths and himself last
year. The subject of the paper is
"Fatigue.".
During the past three months Dr.
Pillsbury has been in Paris where he
has lectured on American psychology.
Professor Pillsbury will resume- his
classes in the fall.
MA INalE TRANSPOT
WOR KERS TO STRIKE
{all Off M*arch on Port Arthur; Lead-
ers Jailed as Advance Guard
Arrives
ACTION IS PROTEST AGAINST
ALLEGED TEXAS ABDUCTIONS
Port Arthur, Tex., July 20.--By A.
P.)-The descent of about 20,000 foot-
loose members of the Industrial
Workers of the World on Port Ar-
thur, itself a city of approximately
20,000, has been called off cad instead
a general strike of the marine work-
ers, members of the I. W. W. is
threatened.
But a few members of the advance
guard had arrived when the 11thhour
orders of high officials of the I. W. W.
called off the march. They are in
jail.
Late last night, Sidney Terry, gen-
eral organizer for the I. W. W., an-
nounced that the impending general
strike would take marine workers out
of vessels in every American port and
the higher officials did not consider it
advisable to concentrate in any one
section. '
The foot-loose members had been
-ordered here in protection of the
rights. of three T. W. W.s alleged to
have been kidnapped away from here
and beaten severely by unknown per-
sons.
The marine strike is to be in protest.
Terry told the Associated Press,
against imprisonments, for violation.
of the criminal syndicalism laws and
against the recent court injunction in
California.
"The strike is to be general, af-
fecting all transport members of our
organization as they come into the
different ports after the strike order
is given," Terry said.
Besides the flank of the army order-
ed retained at Ne wOrleans, another
.flank, Terry declared, has been or-
dered to the New York sector, while
still other contingents from the west
will be diverted from their journey
here to strategic points to await the
"zero hour."
Then, simultaneously the strike will
go into effect over east, west and gulf
coasts and the word may come within
a short time.
New Orleans, July 20.-The police
deparment is preparing for the situ-
ation which might arise from the re-
ported concentration here of unem-
ployed members of' the Industrial
Workers of the World.
Shipping officials apparently are not
concerned over the threatened gener-
al strike of marine workers of the
organization.
Dean Effinger Plans Vacation
Dean John R. Effinger, of the liter-
ary college, will leave M onday for his
vacation which he will spend in the

Adirondacks. He expects to be gone
all summer until the middle of Sep-
tember. His office will be -open during
the summer months.

ANDER SON FLAYS
TAMMANYPOLITICS1
Anti-Saloon head, Indicted for Lar,
ceny Declares Action Conspiracy
to Elect Smith
INVESTIGATION OF RECORDS
RECOMMENDED IN REPORT
New York,\ July 20-(By A.P.)-
William H. Anderson, superintendent
of the Anti-saloon league of New
York today was indicted on several
counts, and the grand jury returned
the indictments recommending legis-
lative investigation since Anderson
took the helm in 114. Three indict-
ments, two charges of grand larceny
in the first degree, and one forgery
in the third degree was handed down
today. Assistant " District Attorney
Tecora announced that the jury had
also voted two indictments charging
extortion and these would be filed
Wednesday.
Released on Ball
Anderson, on hand when the indict-
ments were handed down pleaded not
guilty before his counsel, former Gov-
ernor Charles S. Whitman could open
his mouth, and after the dry crusader
had been released on $5000 bail he
issued through his publicity depart-
mentsa long statement which began-
"I shall wear as the medal of hon-
or and a service badge my indict-
ments for political purposes by the
most corrupt and powerful political
organization in the world as the part
of Tammany conspiracy to put the
nullification governor of New York
state in the White House, in defiance
of the conscience and character of the
nation."
Forgery and Theft Alleged
The first grand larceny indictment
charged Ar#1erson with feloniously ob-
taining $478 from the league in March
of 1921. The grand larceny indict-
ment alleged that he feloniously ob-
tained $1750 on February 3, 1921. The
forgery indictment set forth that, he
had falsely ordered $44Q0 to be en
tered in the League books in March1
1921 as hotel and traveling expenses
of 0. Bertsall Phillips, as collector
for the League. '
NEW HEAD TAKES CHAOS[~
OF EDUCATION COURES'
Announcement was made from the
office of the Summer session that the
second half of courses 101s and 406s
in the School of Education will .be-
gin Monday under the direction of Mr.
Thomas M. Deam, principle of the
high school at Decatur, Ill. Mr. Frank
G. Pickell, assistant superintendent of
public schools in Cleveland and su-
perintendent - elect of the public
schools of Montclair, N. J., was in
charge of the first section.
Mr. George E. Carrothers, also of
Cleveland, was to take the section,
but as he is unable to come this sum-
mer, Mr. Deam has come in his stead.
"WHEN A MAN
SEES RED"

693 ACCEPTED IN
'LITERARY COLLEGEI

Figures Indicate Large Gain in
of This Year's Freshman
Classes

Size

He's Sponsor Of
U.S. Students
In Paris School

NUMBER SHOWS INCREASE OF
77 OVER FIGURES LAST YEAR
Officials in the office of Registrar
Arthur G. Hall report that the appli-
cations of 693 freshmen to the liter-
ary college have been accepted up
to yesterday, as compared with 616
one year ago at this time. This In-
crease of 77 in the application list,
it is believed, is an indication that the
freshmen class will show a substantial
increase this fall, although it is to
early to make a positive estimate.
Registrar Hall, who is on his vaca
tion at Coryell, Mich., receives the ap-
plications as they are forwarded from
his office in the University and admits
or rejects the applicants according
to their qualifications.
MOON VIEWED T H ROUGH
OBSERVATORY TELESCOPE
Under the direction of Prof. R. H
Curtis, assistant director of the Uni-
versity observatory between 8:15 and
10 o'clock last night, summer stu-
dents saw the section of the moon
which includes the "sea of serenity"
and the Lunar Appenines, and the
Lunar Alps. Because of the large
attendance, Dr. Curtis organized;
those present into groups and num-
bers were given the students by which
they were called to look through the
telescope when they reached the tow-
er.
Prof. Richard A. Rossiter pointed
out to the students the parts of the
moon that could be sesen through thei
12-inch telescope. The instrument wasI
the third largest telescope in exist-
ence at the time of its installation
in 1857. It is run by means of a clock
which keeps the telescope pointed at1
the moon continually; it has two eye
pieces, one through which the wholeI
sky can be seen, and the other
through which the students wereI
shown parts of the moon.
Other astronomical apparatus seenl
by the student groups include the
meridian circle which makes observ-
ations for determining time and by
means of which clocks are correct-
ed; a clock which is compared withi
(Continued on Page Four)
FORSYTHE SPEKS ON
HEALTH AND RELIGION
Dr. Warren E. Forsythe, director
of the -University Health service,
speakdng on the subject "Where
Health and Religion Meet" yesterday
afternoon predict-ed that the time will
come when health and religion would
be so closely united in the thoughts
of the people 'that they "would march
in practice under the banner of serv-
ice 'to all mankind."
Dr. Forsythe, who has superintend-
ed the exam;nation of University stu-
dents, stated that the grat amount
of superstition which exists even to-
day is astonishing. "People in the
olden times," he averred, "ascribed
all their ills to some supernatural
power". And even today, the speak-
er asserted, there are people who
place their reliance on some old worn
out superstition. "We have freshmen
enter this University who wear little
bags of assofoedita about their necks
to keep off disease. The number of
lucky teeth and rabbit feet that are
used is astonishing," he stated.

Fermin Roz
Fermin Roz, writer of note, has won
the title of "Godfather of American
Students" in Paris universities byhis
generosity in aiding struggling Am-
erican writers there.
f MAUGHAN AN TS1[
Army Flier Confident That He Can
Span Continent in Single
Day
WAS SAVING MACHINE FOR
FINAL DASH AS LEAK OPENED'
Rock Springs, Wyoming, July 20--9
(By A.P.)-Confident that he can span{
the continent in at single day if giv-
en another chance, Lieut. Russel L.
Maughan, declared today that "he is1
ready and anxious to make the at-
tempt"
Maughan who has received instruc-
tions from .Washington to report to
McCook Field, for instructions, said
he probably would arrive there Sun-
day morning. He expects to fly to
St. Joseph tomorrow and remain there'
Saturday night.'
"I know I can make it. I would{
have made it this time if it had been
a question only of my endurance. I
only had a little more than 600 miles
to go and three hours to make it in.'
I had been saving my engine waiting
for the last dash when the leak op-
ened. My speed was only about 155,
miles an hour because I was saving it
to reduce the wear and tear of the
engine as much as possible."
NOVEL ACTS ARELISTED
ON SPOTLIGHT PROGRAM
Preparations for the annual sum-
mer spotlight vaudeville to be held
Thursday evening, July 26, are be-
ing rushed for much remains to be
done to put the final polish on the
acts listed in the annual, program.
Several dancing acts, a one act play,
a musical number, singers, the revival
of the famous circue act, and other
attractions are to. be offered t' the
public in Hill auditorium in what pro-
mises to be one o the best Spotlights
ever produced.
Carl Weinman, '24, and Paul Wilson,
'24L, admitted to the the two best
cornetists that have been to Michigan
in several years, have promised to pro-
duce something unusual by giving a
concert duet accompanying themselves.
simultaneously on the piano.,

FRANSISCO VILLA,
1REBEL CHIFTAIN
TROOPS SEARCH FOR SLAYERS OF
FORMER MEXICA BANDIT
LEADER
LATEST REPORTS FREE
SECRETARY OF BL ME
Government Fears Politieal Effect of
Leader's Murder; Officials Sms-
Peet Former Officers
Chihuahua City, Mexico., July 20.
-(By A. P.)-Official telegrams
received at militiry headquarters
confirm. the death of Francisco
Villa near Parro this morning and
e'onerate his secretary, Triui4,
of all blame of his death, earlier
telegrams having isaid Villa was
killed by his secretary.
According to the official re-
port, Villa left Parro, accompan.
led by Trillo, two guards and a
chauffeur early this morning.
While going over the Cuanajuaco
bridge near Parro, the parties were
assaulted from both sides by a
number of men. Villa and Trillo
were killed at the same instant,
together with their companions, of-
ficial telegrams say. The bodies
were taken to Parro.
The fight which took place Is
said to'be the outcome of political
disturbances.. General Eugeno
Martinega left here at 11 a. m.
today with 100 soldiers on the way
to Parro.
Mexico City, July 2.-(By A.P.)--
Francisco Villa, former rebel chieftain
was killed in ambush this morning
near Parro, in the city of Chihuahua,
It was confirmed this afternoon by the
department of interior. President Ob-.
regon, it was announced had order-
ed full military honors .be rendered at
the funeral.
Official announcement gave few de-
tails, only that Villa with his per-
sonal secretary, Colonel Trillo and es-
cort has been ambushed near Villa's.
ranch at Canizulla, at 8 o'clock this
morning.
Villa Instantly Killed
Villa was instantly killed together
with Colonel Trillo and other members
of the escort party. There are com-
pleted reports 'as to the ambush. One
of them is that Villa and his compan-
ions were murdered while they were
leaving a railway coach at. the Parro
station;' another is that Villa was hot
by members of his own escort outside
'P rro after he lhad- rebuked them
violently. Ecited canment has been
aroused, especially upon the possible
political consquences of Villa's death.
His support, according to the reports
has been promised to General Raoul
Madero, as presidential candidate
Madero, a brother of the assassinated
president, Francisco Madero com-
manded a brigade in the Revolution
against Huerta.
Left Ranch Early' x
Villa left his ranch at dawn this
morning and arrived at Crossaria sta-
tion an hour later. ethen approach-
ed a train and started for Parro reach-
ing there about 8 o'clock.
Villa's body lies in the Parro hal
awaiting orders from the government.
Chihuahua City, Mexico, July 20.-

(By A.P.)-One hundred troops under
command of General Eugenio Martin-
ego arrived at Parro tonight to lend
aid, in the search for the men who
killed Villa and his secretary, Trillo,
and three men who were with them
near Parro this morning.
Suspect Herrera
While the assassins are unidentified
(Continued to Page Four)

Is after a long hot day
pacing the streets to
find a party interested
in his wares. A want
ad. would cover a great-
er number of people in
less time.
CALL
JIMMIE
THE AD-TAKER,

National
acinnati 11, Brooklyn
ston 8, Pittsburg 5.
iladelphia 1, Chicagot
w York 10, St. Louis

4.

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9.

960

ee the

UNION

SUMMER

SPOTLIGHT

J..

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V-

A

Y, JULY 26,

HILL AUDITORIUM 8 P. M.

TICKETS

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