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July 20, 1923 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-07-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JULY 20, 1923

PRICE

,,

;HAN FOflRCED
L LEAK CAUSE

New York-Bagdad
Tripr In Fifteen
Days, New Plans
- .

[0 DISPATCH, RECEIVED
SA LT LAKE CITY TELLS
OF LANDING

A't t
-a

OES FROM SPRINGS TO
uHEYENNE AT 170 M. P. H.
iable to Repair Damaged Oil Line
at Air Field at Rock
Springs"
BULLETIN
Rock Springs, Wyom., July 19.-(By
,P.)-Forced down by a new leak in
e oil cooling tank of his plane,
lut. Russell L. Mauglhan, was fore-
to abandon his attempt to cross the
utinent between dawn and dusk
to this afternoon, He landed at the
ir Mall field at 5:08 p. N. Maughan
wssed over Rock Springs at 4:58 P.
. apparently bent upon continuing
s flight despite the leak, but he turn-
I back a few minutes later and land-
'"It would'require from three to four
>urs to repair the leak." Maughan
rd the Associated Pres "consequ-
itly the flight is off." He was greatly
sappointed at the second failure
hich had greeted his attempt to cross
to continent, and his demeaior pln-
ndicated disgust as he walked away
on the field.
Sailt Lake City, July 19.-(By A.P.)
41Lieut. Russell L.. Maughan wasl
Lrced toulandsat the Air Mail field at
ock Springs, Wyom., at 5:08 p. m. to-
af and will not be able to continue
s trans-continental dawn-to-dusk
ght according to a radio messagerto
:, local Air Mail~field from the Air
ail station at Rock Springs. The]
essage received at the local sta-
on read: "Maughan landed 5:08.1
annot continue flight this date."
An additional radio despatch de-
ared the aviator's plane was lea-
g oil badly it was announced by the
Ir' Mkail officials when he made the
nding. No other details were re-
dved.
After flying over Rock Springs at
58 p. 'm. en route to Salduro, the
urth landing place of the proposed
oss country flight, Lieutenat Maug-
an was forced to return to the Air
fail field there, the local Air Mail
eld advices said. Later radio advces
eceived at the Air Mail field reported
iat the flyer was forced down by a.
roken oil line.
Only two pilots, Harry Chandler,
nd Judd Sharpmack of the United
tates Air Mail Service, were at Rock
prings field when Maughan. descend-
d, advices received here state.
Maughan stepped out of the plane
nd asked them to se if It we're possi-
le to repair the leak in the oil line.
The pilot made an examination of
he damaged line but soon ascertained
at it would be impossible to make
hie repairs in time to enable Maughan
> continue his flight. Maughan obvi-
usly disappointed, and discouraged,
fter waiting at the field for about.20
ilnutes went to Rock Springs.
The leak was in the oil cooler and
ras around the edges of the soldered
ortion of the tank which had been
epaired at Cheyenne.
Maughan made the trip from Chey-
nne to Rock Springs, 245 miles, in
ne hour and thirty-two .minutes, or
t a speed of approximately 170 miles

OBEVAOYTO BE OPEN
TO STDNTS TORi'GHT,
MOON AND ST IRS TO BE VIE WE
THROUGH ASTRONOMICAL
TELESCOPE
Tonight at 8:15 o'clock the Univer-
sity Observatory will be open for three
hours, during which time three relays
of observers will be conducted through
t h eu astronomical laboratories.
Through the evening the telescope will
be focused on the moon, and time
permiting, the stars will be observed.
The privilege of -visiting the Ob-
servatory is enjoyed only by students(
of the Summer session, and admis-
sion is by ticket pnly. The Observa-
tory is situated on the corner of East
Ann and Observatory streets, direct-
ly in back of Palmer field.
REGENTS IS DENIED

WITHDIRAWAL OF TROOPS IS
LIEVED NECESSARY
CONCESSION

BE-

-Norman D. Nairn,
Norman D. Nairn of New Zealand,
head of the Nairn Transportation com-
pany, is on his way ,to inaidgurate a
fast transportation' service from HaifaI
across the Persian desert to Bagdad.
He has been in New York purchasing,
autos for the project. He -plans to
make therNew York-Bagdad trip a
15-day journey.
Are Enrolled in Practically Every
College, Report Indicates;
Total is 582
45 PER CENT AF SCHOOL OF'
EDUCATION ARE GRADUATES
Graduate students form a compar-
.atively large percentage of the Sum-,
mer session enrollment of the liter-
ary college, a report issued from th
office of the Dean of the Summer ses-
sion yesterdiy, indicates.v
Wtih the exception of a few elemen-
tary courses in the literary college,
graduates are found enrolled in prac-j
tically every branch of work in every
depirtment and constitute a total of
582 graduates.
In the School of Education, which
has broadened its scope this year, out
of 89 students who have elected work,
451 are graduate students which is
more than 45 per cent of the total
elections. .
In the Engineering) college and
' Medical school, the proportion of gra-
duates enrolled is slightly above the
figure during the regular session.
i *
Commons Passes Naval Estimate
London, July. 19.-(By A.P.)-After
a spirited debate in the house of
commons tonight -on the merits and
demerits of the Singapore naval
treaty, the government obtained a
victorious vote carrying the naval es-
timate under closure ,by 217-130.
The opponents of the Singapore pro-
ject bitterly complained that it was
against the spirit of the Washington
agreement and would lead to competi-'
tion 'in armaments and to future war.

GERMANSHRDYTO
STOP RESISTANCE
IN RUHR, REPORT;

All Obstacles Ii Way of Building
Construction Are Now
Removed
CLAIMED THAT AWARD MADE
BY REGENTS WAS TOO SMALL
Lansing, July 1-(By A.P.)-The
supreme court today denied the pe-
tition of Raymond P. Brooks and oth-
ers for a writ of certiorari tot; review
proceedings of the University of Mich-
igan sought to acquire property in
Ann Arbor for the new university law
building and Lawyers' club.. The su-
preme court ruling removes a legal
obstacle to proceeding with the con-
struction of the building.
The board of regents, by a lower,
order, purchased and from 11 proper-
ty owners for $230,870. Six of the
property owners accepted the con-
demnation price. Five objected,
claiming that the award was inade-
quate and that the board of regents
had no constitutional authority to ac-
quire title.
The supreme court'held that it is
not illegal for the board of regents
acting for the state to hold title to
property for the benefit of the univer-
sity.
WANG ELECTED PRESIDENT
OF COSMOPOLITAN CLUB
William Wang, '24E, was elected
president of the Cosmopolitan club at
a recent meeting. The club is corn-

ARE NOT BELIEVED
ACCEPTABLE BI FRENCH
Think Germans Want French to Re-
tu5n Confiscated Gold and Silver
Currency
Paris, July 19--(By A.P.)-The Ger-
man government, through its embassy
in London, is striving to have the
forthcoming British note on repara-
tions convey to the French govern-
ment Germany's willingness to cease
passive resistance in the Ruhr, sub-
ject to certain concessions on the part
of France.
This information has reached the
French government on what is re-
garded as unquestionable, but unoffi-
cial authority. These concessions ap-
pear to include:
1. Withdrawal of the Franco-Bel-
gian troops of occupation with the
exception of a mere skeleton military
force which would in the diplomatic
sense be "invisible".,
2. Permission for the German offi-
cials and functionaries expelled from
the Ruhr to return to their posts re-
storing the local administration of all
civi services as it existed before Jan.
11 when the occupation took place.
3. That the French government
agree to restore the currency it con-
fiscated.
Are Not Acceptable
These conditions, it is declared here,
would be unacceptable to the French
government because they are unac-
companied by any, definite assurances
or guarantees that reparation pay-
ments would be forthcoming.
Likewise .it is explained the French
government feels that since France is
enforcing the peace treaty and Ger-
many is refusing to execute it, it
would not be equitable that Germany
shou'ld impose conditions instead of
yielding to the French demands.
Germany, it is asserted, first must
cease her passive resistance, after
which the French government would
be disposed on its own account fav-
orably to consider Germany's views,
whereas it could not receive them in
the nature ,of ultimatum. The Brit-
ish government, it is said already is
aware of the French ministry's feel-
ing on this subject.

Forsythe To Talk
on "Where Health
And Religion Meet"
"Where Health and Religion Meet,"
will be the subject of the lecture giv-
en by Dr. Warren E. Forsythe, of the'
University Health Service, this after-
noon at 5 o'clock.
Dr. Forsythe will explain the rela-
tion which has always existed be-
tween man's notions of disease and
man's notions of religious thought.
These tendencies will be traced back
to their supposed origin- with prim-
itive man. He will also point out the
common interests or meeting place of
religion and health, and the position
of these interests in the future time
will be discussed.
JACBSWIN HIGH
HONORS AT OXFORD
Local Graduate Receives High First
in "Sihools"-Passed Law
Exams
RHODES SCHOLAR HANDICAPPEI)
BY HEMORRHAGE OF EYE
Word has been received' here that
Albert Jacobs, '22, son of Mrs. Grace
Jacobs, of 16 Forest avenue, who went
to Oriel college, Oxford, as a Rhodes
scholar, has passed his examinations
for the first degree in law and has
received a high first in his "schools "
Jacobs took his tests under a sev-
ere handicap for he had been suffer-
ing for a month from hemorrhage of
the eyeand was able to study only
two hours a day.
However he passed everything with
a high first. His record is consideredl
excellent, in that three years are or-
dinarily required for the first degree
in law at Oxford.
Jacobs will remain another year at j
Oxford during which time he hopes,
to win a higher degree in his chosen
profession.
Yesterday's Games

WHTE STRE5SE!
DEVELO PMENT(
"VAST IMPROVEMENT MADI
INDUSTRY IN, COUNTRIES
SAYS SPEAKER
MICHIGAN RANKS FIF1
AS INDUSTRIAL STY
Points Out That Only Four Per
I of People Make Over $4,000
Annually
In an address yesterday after
in the Science auditorium, on
Industrial Situation", Prof.
White of the engineering s
stressed the vast improvements
have occurred in industry not or
this cQuntry but in foreign cou
as. well during the last fifteen ,
"Michigan is one of the leade
this great movement," he ass
"and we can be proud that she s
fifth in the United States today
industrial state. We were one c
first to adopt the improvements
have so bettered conditions in i
try."
Professor White showed
changes that have -been wroug
a comparatively short time.
tlhere were yeat's when the'p
were literally slaves of their en
ers, working for no wages at
change was affected, the empl
were.allowed to change from one
ter to another, they had a slight
but in all senses of the word,
were still slaves. This period
known as serfdom. From 1860
comparatively recent times, a
system has beenfollowed whic
speaker termed the present wag(
tem, ,a. system in which long l
hard work and small pay wer
key marks; a system where w
and children were forced to wc
the mines, drawing heavy car
metal on all fours, a system
produced poverty and want in
land of plenty. Now however we
arrived at a stage which Pro
White characterized as the "C
ative wage system".
Period Characterized Distine
This period has been charact
by distinctive features, and swe
advancement in the improveme
the conditions of the working
(Continued to Page Four)

Cleveland 3, Washington 2.
Athletics 7, St. Louis 4.
Chicago 8, Boston 3.
Detroit 9, New York 2.,
Brooklyn 1, Cincinatti 0.
Pittsburg 8, Boston 6.
Chicago 7, Phillies 1.
St. Louis 3, New York 0.

Old Guard In Minnesota
Meets Jinx In Jol

-esting

Trip Promised
Detroit River

To
Excursionists

posed of students from all nations.
Plans were made for a reception for
foreign, students which will be held
in October.
The Purpose of the club is to assist
all foreign students by bringing them
together socially. It also offers an op-
portunity for an exchange of ideas
on an international scale.
AM.ERICAN ASSOCIATION OF
UNIVERSITY "WOMEN MEETS
The 38th general meeting of the Am-
erican Association of University wom-
en is being held in Portland, Ore., this
week.
Mrs. Glen Levin Swiggett, of Wash-
ington, is chairman of the board of
managers as well as being a member
fif the American committee of the
International Federation of Universi-
ty wvomen. Mrs. Swiggett also holds
office in the Women's Auxiliary com-
mitee of the Pan-American Scientific
congress. The auxiliary is being or-
ganized under the direction of the
national sections of the Pan-American
women's conference and Mrs. Swiggett
has been chosen executive secretary.
Order British Immigrants Admitted
New York, July 19.-(By A. P.) -
Imrmigration Commissioner Curren
was instructed from Washington to-
day to admit 521 British subjects who
arrived on the .steamship "Baltic" to
the United States under a special "re-
bate quota." The immigrants were
detained after the British quota of 15,-
468 for the month of July was being

London, July 19-(By A.P.)-Lord
Curon is experiencing more ?difficulty
in the preparation of the note to Ger-
many than has been expected. It is
now reported that the note and the
cover letter is not to be despatched
to the Allies until next week, but
whether the trouble has arisen from
political friction in the Cabinet as al-
leged in some quarters or is simply
from the inherent difficulties of fram-
ing a reply to Germany which would
not offend&.France, it is not evident.
Baldwin in Conference
After today's long cabinet council
the Foreign Secretary had a confer-
ence with Premier Baldwin. This con-
ference prevented Lord Curzon from
seeing Count De Aulair, the French
ambassador, who called at the foreign
office while the conversation was Pro-
ceeding.
It is believed, although nothing is
known officially, that Curzon is mak-
ing the greatest effort to find a way
to compromise on the question of pas--
sive resistance in the Ruhr. He has
had. conversation with the German
ambassador, the latest of which was
yesterday, probably with the idea of
finding how fair the German govern-
nment might be willing to recede from
the support of the passive resistance
movement provided France could be
induced to 'revert to merely civil oc-
cupation of the Ruhr.

,

.

-
i

(By Carlton F. Wells)
e afternoon boat ride tomorrow
n the Detroit river to Bob-Lo is-'
a picturesque park-isle near the
of Lake Erie, promises to be one
ei pleasantest features of the ex-
ion. After thehour's journey on
boat, two hours or more will be,
[able for enjoying this island play-
nd. Here, under the Canadian
rnment, is operated one of finest
ing pavilions in the middle West,'
ral playgrounds and baseball dia-
ds, a bathing beach; the customary

block house, a relic of the war of
1812. Those in the student party who
can do so, are urged to bring their
own picnic lunches. Meals on the is-
land are obtained at the Bob-Lo cafe,
however..
Preceding the picnic party to Bob
Lo, the group will have the privilege
of seeing the largest and finest bank
building in Detroit. Mr. Frank J.
Campbell of the advertising depart-,
-ient of the First National Bank, will
conduct the visitors through the var-
ious branches of the bank's activities,
including the foreign exchange divi-
sion, the branch bank division, and the
safety deposit and huge underground,

STAFF APPOINTMENTS

Nathan M. Davis has been ap-
pointed issue editor and Richard
Heideman and W. K. Boyer staff
members of the Summer Michi-.
( gan Daily.

i
i

Senator-Elect' Magnius Johnsom
Like the "Old Guard"' of Napoleon at Waterloo, the G. O. F
Guard" in Minnesota died, but did not surrender.
And to carry the figure still farther politicians, Democratic and
lican alike, are wondering if the same blasted dreams of power
followed the little Corsican's defeatwill visit the Republican par
Does the triumph of the shirtsleeved Farmer-Labor candidate,
Johnson, presage, defeat for the Republicans in the 1924 campaign
pudiation of the Harding administration?
"No," comes the chorus ,rom G. O. P. citadels.

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