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July 19, 1923 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-07-19

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A.SSOCIA
PRES
DAY AND IG]
SERIi

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JULY 19, 1923,PRICE FIVI

EDI TORIAL{
"WITHIN THE LAW"
Mercenary interests of real estate
owners in New York City have reach-
ed a stage under the new "ironclad
lease" agreement of the United Real
Estate Owners association which puts
the tenants of East Sidle tenement dis-
tricts in a place only compara le to
that, of serfs under feudal o)pre sion
!of medieval times.
Running directly in conflict to the
Rosemman law which was recently en-
acted to protect the le ssee from unfairI
treatment at the hands of crafty land-f
lords, this new plan of the 'landlord's
union' is depriving the tenants of al-j
most every privilege it is theirs to!
possess They are allowed to pay rent,
to pay for all of their light, heat, wat-
er, and repairs. Aside from this per-
,mission to disburse their meagre re-
sources, there are no other allowances.
All else restricts their privileges.
Each apartment is limited as to
number of tenants which may occupy
it under a fixed rental and for every
additional person living in it .there
is an prorata charge annexed to the
regular fee. The promulgators of the
new agreemen$ which deprives the
lessee of his legal rights of posses-
sion have announced that .they adopt-
ed the measures under fire as pr6-
tection against false charges against
landlord, superintendent, janitor, and

Fifty Years Old;
Drives 25 Miles
To Attend College
Students may grumble and groan
over a cross-campus walk to a 10
o'clock class, and flivvers may revolt
against the cruel fate that put them
in the power of a student, but here's
B. G. Sutton of Maybe, Monroe
county, who drives 25 miles every,
day to attend classes in the Univer-
sity, and he never "bolts" or fails
to be on time.
Although close to the half century
mark in years, Mr. Sutton can keep
up with most of his younger class-
mates, when it comes to early morn-
ing vigor or lasting animation.
While many summer students at='
tend classes half-heartedly, then drift
lazily down to the river for a swim,.
Sutton goes to the library to studyj
for the next day's work, before driving
back to Maybe where he performs
his duties as pastor of the Congrega-j
tional church in that town.
Mr. Sutton graduated from Adrianj
college in 1898, where he received his
Ph.B. degree. He also received de-
grees from Kansas City, but still not'
satisfied with his education, he en-
rolled in the School of Education here.
He is looking for- new ideas, new hob-
-bies and methods.
PLANNED0BY LEAGUEI

erely

g, secre-
able
.-(By A.
al Work-
eaving a
he labor
ity work,

They have virtually accussed the
occupants of their buildings with
mpss action wholly unjust and giving
the tenants an undue advantage since
they ordinarily outnumber the own-
er and his employees about ten to
)one. What sort of results they expect
to obtain by such treatment of the
men and women who furnish the main
portion of their income are hard to
imagine.
This organization is another highly
organized unit which has as its pur-
pose, staying "within the law." Sam-
kiel Untermeyer, attorney of the Fed-
eration of Tenant's Associations of
Greater New York, that is now bring-
ing suit against the landowner's or-
ganization, characterizes the action'
as bringing suit against the land-
as a "grotesgue and unlawful scheme
to circumvent the law." Going con-
trary to the spirit of the law is as
great an offense as direct disrespect
of it, and these manipulators are as
deserving of prosecution as those who
brazenly challenge the legal authority
of the state.

Lists of Alumnae and Alumni
Campaign Data Are Com-
pleted

for

in-

ree I. W.
OPEN

'T

QUOTAS FOR SOLICITORS
WILL BE ESTABLISHED
Progress in the organization pre-
paratory to the $1,000,000 campaign
for the Michigan Women's League
building, is reported by Mrs. Mollie
Price Cook, campaign advisor. The
lists of the University alumnae and,
alumni which will be used in the drive,
have already been compiled.
Charts showing the relation in
numbers of alumnae and alumni in
each istate have just been completed.
These will be used as a basis for the
district quotas to be established; also
the publicity organiration will kie-
pend largely upon the figures of these
charts. Most of the alumni come from
the states of Michigan and Illinois,
the proportion of women and men
being 4,634 to 12,689 and 620 to 3-178
respectively, while the lowest number
come from South Carolina and Dela-
ware, the proportion there being 3 to
34 and 5 to 17. In 30 of the southern
states, no city has over 101 alumnae,
which means that no permanent group
organixation can be formned there.
Shakespeare Authority Dtes
New York, July 18.-(By A.P.)-
Louis Calvert iled at his home here
last night. He was one of the best
authorities, on Shakespeare in this
country andhad been teaching Shakes-
pearian students at New York uni-
versity recently,
Cheer Up'! We Have
Some Bananas !

BRITISH-GERMAN
NOTE READY FOR,
FINALPPROVAL
GOES BEFORE CABINET TODAY;
EARLY AGREEMENT IS
LIKELY
FRENCH FAVOR GIVING
PLANS CONSIDERATION
Paris Expected to Receive dote Fri-
day; Further Exchange of Views
Seems Probable
London, July 18-(By A.P.)--
The drafit of the British note to
Germany was completed today
it is expected that one sitting of
the cabinet council tomorrow will
suffice to obtain approval of the
ministries in which case the note,
with covering letter, will prob-
ably be despatched to the allied
governments Friday for their ap-
royal and to Washington not nee-
essarily for comment, but as a
matte of courtesy. .
It is generally understood that
neither document will see the1
light fnally until the note is in
the hands of the German govern-
ment the date of which will de-
pend upon how long the British
government has to wait for re-
plies fronm the allies.
London, July 18-(By A.P)-Some
observers here believe a change is no-
ticeable in the French attitude toward
the note Great Britalh is to propose
as a joint allied- reply to Germany
and that the situation indicates an
increased willingness of France to
consider the British draft when it is
submitted,
The diplomatic correspondent of
the Daily Telegraph says "the change
may be purely atmospheric and may
not imply any indication of an abate-
Continue Passive Resistance I1
Essen, July -18- (By A.P.)- I
The Ruhr population intend to
continue passive resistance, a j
high Berlin government official, I
who has been in touch with the 1
situation here since the occu-
pation began, informed the As- c
socated Press correspondent |
today. Whatever England may {,
j propose to Berlin in the forth- I
coming note conerning resist-
ance, he added, there was notj
the slightest indication that the
Ruhr people were even thinking +
of receding their resistance un-
der the present general outlook. 1
.
ment of the French official stand-
point. On the other hand, it conceiT-
ably may be the outcome of consider-
ations urged by Belgium which is
working for) conciliation, or by
friends of the entente, like Premier
Bones of Czecho-Slovakia."
Arrangements Secret
Paris, July 18.-The French foreign
office indicated today that it expected
to receive the British communication
on the reparations problem Friday.
It has been pre-arranged by both
the French and British foreign offices
that the precise terms of the note
shall be guarded with the greatest
secrecy until the two governments
have reached an agreement or have

become convinced that they cannot
agree,
It is not supposed in the highest,
political levels here that the note will
be such that it can be either accept-
ed or rejected as a whole. Some im-
portant points, according to hints re-
(Continued to Page Four) '

Scientist Claims
Evolution Proof

Prof. Paul Kammerer
Prof, Paul Kammerer, a biologist of
the University of Vienna, claims to
have demonstrated the truth of evolu-
tion. In support of his claim he ex-
hibits a newt, originally sightless,
which has developed eyes,
del Toro Lectures on Development of,
Early Spanish Educational
Institutions
EXPLAINS SYSTEMS CURRENT
IN SOUTH AMERICAN STATES,
Beginning with a summarization of
the universities of the Spanish-Am-
erican countries And new tendenc-
ies constantly being developed in
them, Prof. Julio del Toro, of the
Romance langue department of the
University delivered an illutrated lec-
ture yesterday afternoon on education
in the Spanish colonies.
He stated that during' that period
theology was the subject most stress-
ed, After the South American col-
onies gained their independence, the
governments took control of the high-
er educational institutions in the
country.
La Plat, a university in Buenos
Aires, Argentine,. he stated, is the
most modern institution up to the pre-
sent time and has just opened the
first dormitory for non-resident stu-
dents in Spanish-America. The med-
ical school is far more important than
any the 'branch of learning, al-
though law comes i na close second.
"Most teachers are prepared in
normal school, those in Chile and Ar-
gentine being the best," said Profes-
sor del Toro, adding that in the last
year the first woman ever to be
granted a professorship was appoint-,
ed to the chair of psychology in Chile.
Up until the past few years athletics
and other college activities were un-
(Continued on Page Four)
Semester In Law .
Closes On July 23

EXCAVATION WORK IS
STRUCTURE WILL HAVE
ING CAPACITY OF 7
PLAN COMPLETION
FIRST FLOOR BY
Professors McConkey and I
Authors of
Plans.
With the breaking of grc
starting of excavation yeste
construction of the new CatI
dents chapel at William and
son streets is under way.
tion for the basement was be
terday with a small crew of
teams. According to Henry
general contractor, the erecti
building should go on witho
ruption, since it is hoped
basement will be completed
pancy by the beginning of I
lar fall term. The structure
cupy the entire vacant lot
corner, will be two stories
cluding the basement.
Modern Architecture
The construction materia:
used are light colored brick,
namentation and decorations
cotta to match the brick N
distinctly modern style of
ture will be used, which,
practical, will still convey 1
dignified atmosphere of the of
lastical type of architectu
roof is to be of a high con,
composed of gray slate roofin
ials. The building's main
will face William street, w
front will open on to 'I
street, with entrances on bc
A unique belfry motive will 1
on the William street facad(
The seating capacity of tl
will be approximately 700,
of the sacristy, which is to b
in the north-east corner. T
basement will be devoted to
activities and will serve as
headquarters for all Catholic
It will contain reading and
rooms for botl men and wo
dents, as well, as a librar3
will also be a smoking room
The basement will be equip
moveable partitions which m
be removed to make one 1
for such functions as lectui
meetings and banquets. The
of the basement will be a
(Continued on Page Fc

GROUND BR[FHC9H
STUDENTS'

will have
the moon
e Univer-
aer of Ob-
at 8:15
.7 ~A.

PANNING THE ADMINISTRATION
Echoes from other student news-
paper in .the Conference, to which
we daily lend ear, proclaim the fact
that the famous pastime ofpanning the
university administration does not
abate even duing the summer.
From the editorial columns of one

)3, and 24.
noon will be in t
eriod in which t
Oadily be disting
part of. the eve
of tickets, whi
s limited, but the
ining and studen
them may do
ir treasurer'sr
r school office.

he
he
u-

.,

n- publication comes the lament that the
ch administration is to blamne for the
re poor condition of the swimming beech
nts in the vicinj4y of the campus. Again
so we hear that a history course is not,
re- taught in an intelligent fashion, and
. stil . third offers an explanation for
student failures in the theory that all
professors are narrow and arrogant
in their attitude toward the student.
2S When students learns that co-oper-
ation and investigation with the fac-
3?" ulty of their institutions rather than
to blind attack. is most facile and less
the roeky road to reform, the publication
"It vs. the faculty problem will have been
s a solved, .
or- In administrative problems the ad-
ied vice not the antagonism of the stu-
:er, dent is to be sought. The good old
)ns chip on the shoulder makes kindling
ing wood for a big or little fire of an-
imosity between the publication and
its institution.

FRESH AIR CAMP 13Th
THIRD SECTION OF
One hundred and ten you:
practically all of them from. t
enile courts of Detroit, will to
gin getting their coats of tan
third section of the University
Air camp on the shores of Pa
lake. The 'group which arrived
camp yesterdary and spent ,th
night in the open, are ready t
take up camp routine and enjo
ten day outing.
The camp is sponsored by I
dents' Christian association.
sity students, acting as tent
devote their time during the
assisting in its management.
The first two sections wb~.c
been sheld furnished recreat
more than 200 poor childrei
fourth section of the camp wi
immgediately upon. the close
section which begins today, a
continue during the customary
of ten days.

turning
g for t
day.
It was

And
take
any
want
cles.

are completely able to
care of your wants of
description, A Daily
ad. can perform mira-
Just

CALL
JIMMIE
THE AD-TAKER

The Law school will, finish its fist
semester next week, and examinations
in taxation and quasi-contracts will
be held on Tuesday, July 24.
The second semester will begin on
Wednesday,, July 25. Final examin-
ations will be held Aug. 29 and 30.
There will be no classes, on the daysy
on which the examinations are held,
it was announced in the dean's of-
flee yesterday.

060

_, -s

UNION

SUMMER

SPOTLIGH

£,

_.. _ y

,Y

HILL AUDITORIUM, 8 P. M.

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