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August 07, 1923 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-08-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Gil ~iVll.'...1 J.JrI LA.J1JJI

ciety To

aise Level Of Play

"Society owes it to the people to
raise the level of play in work be-
cause the value of work depends on
play to a great extent," said Prof. El-
mer D. Mitchell, of the physical edu-
cation department, yesterday in a lec-
ture on'the "Serious Side of Play."
Professor Mitchell advanced four
theories in regard to play and its de-
velopment and outlined the merits as
well as the defects of each. le trac-
ed play back to ancient times when
the elements of our games were the
serious necessities of life, and told
He saidJ partnentfects
of the development of each. He said,
"All sorts of line games such as foot-
ball, pom-porn pullaway, etc., are the
results of battles and wars, and cir-
cle games are the results of friendly
councils and gatherings of ancient
times."
Professor Mitchelil said that the
philosopher asks, "Why do we play,"
and tries to solve the question with
the theories of surplus energy, in-
stinctive play, recapitulation and re-
laxation.
He then treated play from a psych-
ological standpoint by saying that the
only essential difference betwen work
and play lies in the attitude of mind
and when the reward is sufficient in
iself, the action is called play, but
when this condition ceases to exist
and an external reward is necessary,
it is work.
Professor Mitchell also spoke of sev-
eral great Americans and how they,
consider their work as a sort of play'
becatse ,the successful accomp1jsh-
ment of their work was reward enough
f or their untiring efforts.
"From the educational and social
Axierican League
New York 5, St. Louis 3.
Cleveland 5, Washington 2. .
Athletics 14, Chicago 4.,
Boston 2, Detroit 1.
National League,
Phillies 6, Pittsburg 4.
New York 4-5, Cincinnati 2-4..
Brooklyn 5, Chicago 1.
Find that lost pin through the clas-
sified Ad" will find it for you.-Adv.

standpoints, the right kind of play
should be encouraged because it, cuts
down juvenile crime, keeps children
in better health, builds character and
gives them a keen insight into human
nature," asserted, Professor Mitchell.
Will Open Choral,
Union Program
a i

9ALLI-CURCI T
CONCERT HERE, IN FAL
Amelita GalliCurci, noted soprano,
will open the Choral Union Concert
series this fall, giving a concert on
Oct. 19. When Galli-Curci was in
Ann Arbor the last time, she was rec-
ognized as a coming artist, and since
then the soprano has reached great
heights, now being acclaimed the
greatest living coloratura soprano in
the world.
Mme. Galli-Curci was born at Milan,
Italy, in 1860. She received her mus-
ical enducation at the Milan Conser-
vatory, from where she graduated as
a pianist. Galli-Curci made her debut
at Rome as Gilda in "Rigolett" in
1910. For six years she sang at im-
portant theaters in Europe. Her Am-
erican debut was in 1916 with the
Chicago Opera company, where the
success of the Italian prima donna,
was sensational. She made a concert
tour of 44 engage|nents in the 1916-
1917 season.
20 0 EXPECTED TO ATTEND
ANU L SUMME BINQUET
Over 175 tickets have been sold
for the annual banquet to be given
for Summer session students, at the
Union tonight att6:30to'clock 200
are expected to attend the affair.
Dr. M. S. Pitman, professor of ed-
ucation at the Ypsilanti normal school
and a guest professor in, the-Uni-
versity this summer will be toast-
master for the occasion. The formal
toast list includes Dr. C. O. Davis,
who will speak for the faculty; W.
L. Coffey, representative of the state
department of public instruction; and
Miss Elsie Toles, ex-superintendent of
public instruction in Arizona. The
program includes a whistling solo by
Mrs. C. E. Bower, and a vocal solo
by Mrs. W. W. Gunsen. 'Group sing-
ing will be led by W. W. Gunsen.
Tickets for the banquet may still be
obtainable in Tappan hall.
Patronize Daily advertisers.-Adv.

Wesbrook To Play
With Henessey In
National Doubles
Walter Wesbrook, former University
of Michigan tennis ace, will play in
the National doubles championship at
Boston with his partner, Johnny Hen-
nessey, late this month. Hennessey
and Wesbrook -won the Western
doubles championship, held at Chica-
go last week, and thus won the right
to represent their district in the Bos-
ton meet. The middle West team ranks
fourth among the doubles combina-
tions in the United States and are be-
ing counted upon to cut quite a swath
in the national tourney.
Wesbrook added another title to his
long 'list ,when he won the Western
singles, defeating George Lott, of Chi-
cago, in the finals in straight sets.'
Lott had previously beaten Hennessey,
1922 champ., in the semi-fianls, the
loser playing far below his usual stel-
lar game. Nevertheless, experts re-

gard Lott, who is a junior, to be a
comer. He is now generally recogniz-
ed as Chicago's premier player.
PIll DELTA KAPPA TO HOLD
OC ING AT Wi:HTMORE LAKE
Members of the Phi Delta Kappa
fraternity will hold their annual out-
ing at Whitmore Lake Wednesday af-
ternoon at 4 o'clock. Baseball will be
the main feature of the program until

6 o'clock, when a steak s
be served.
Mr. Frank Pickell, of the
Education will be the princi
er.
Jackson Inmate De
Jackson, Aug. 6-(By A.]
Prices, 65, died at the priso
He was sentenced from Ing
ty in Feb., 1921, to serve
10 years for assault.

Today-
JO1NNY WALKER and EILEEN PERCY in
"THE FOURTH MUSKETEER"
Snub Pollard in "JACK FROST"
Thurs. Thru Sat.-
Jane Movak in
"THELMA"
By Marie Coreli
Monty Baks in "A QUIET VACATION.,,
Coming-
"COUNTERFEIT. LOVE"

Today-
Edward (Hoot) Gibson in
"OUT OF LUCK"
Bull Montana in "GLAD RAGS"
Wed. -' urs.-
Conway Teazle in
"MAROONED HEARTS"
Comedy and Screen Snapsho
Fri.-Sat.-
Roy Stewart in
"BACK TO YELLOW-JACKET'
By Peter B. Kyne

AT THE THEATERS

'
~

Screen-Today

I.

MNme Amelita Galli-Curci
Athletic System
Graphs Compiled
In CoachingExam
Among some of the questions ask-
ed students in athletic coaching on
their ,examirmations last week Was:
"Draw a plan of the athletic system
in your school or college and tell how
you think it may be improved." As a
result George Little is in possession
of more than 60 carefully drawn
graphs of the athletic systems used in
educational institutions from Canada
to the Mexican border.
Among some of theufinest pieces of
work are those of stu dents at Bald-
vin Wallace college, Ironwood high
school, Ottawa, Canada,. high school,
and Scott high school, which is said
to have one of the finest athletic plants
in the country.

Majestic-Marquerite de la Motte
and Marjorie Daw in "Wand-
ering Daughters"; also Regin-
ald Denny in "The Leather
Pushers."
Wuerth - Johnnie Walker and
Eileen Percy in "The Fourth
Musketeer."
Orpheum-Hoot Gibson in "Out
of Luck."

Vacation time again! A new
enjoyment for vacation will
be a Johnson motor attach-
ment for the boat. Call us up
and make an appointment
for a demonstration.
Schlenker's Hardware
213 West Liberty Street

lb.

Stage-This Week

Garrick (Detroit) - The' Bon-
stelle company in "Six Cylin-
der Love."

-r - -

It is an embarrasing and pro-
voking occurrence when your
hand bag flys open and things
fall all over the floor.
Wilkin 's fevertie " 1lags and
Purses eliminate the possibility
of this.

W IER TO GIVE INFORMAL
TALK ON HISTORY OF

CELLO

Classified Advertising.
Rates: Two cents per word
per day, paid in advance; fif-
teen cents per reading line per
day, charged.

,

FOR RENT t

FOR RENTJTwo double rooms, single

beds. Very desirable.
rence St.

718 r Law-
39-c

At 8 o'clock Wednesday evening in
the auditorium of University hall,
Prof. M. C. Wier will give an informal
talk on the history of the cello, the
cello as a work of art and the cello as
a musical instrument. Professor Wier
will illustrate his talk with examples
of the different types of playing.,
Coolidge Busy
Washingtoin, Aug. 6--(By A.P.)-A
constant stream of visitors kept Pres-
ident Coolidge busy today and gave
him an insight into;some of the gov-
ernmental problems requiring his ear-
ly attention. Conferences were held
on a variety of subjects but they all
were subordinated to the preparation
of plans for the funeral here of
President Harding.
Min nesota Co0,c11 Resigns
Paul Loudon, assistant football
coach at the University of Minnesota,
has resigned his position.
Let "Jimmie the adtaaer" find it!

I
I
I1
I
I1

SCOTT FITZGERALD said
'The Father of s, Modern Girl
Should Be a Night Watchman"
MERE IS A DELIGHTFULLY TOLD STORY OF TWO
HIDDEN ROMANCES ILLUSTRATING AN
INTERESTING BIT OF REAL LIFE

How Late Should A Decent Party
A --

Not a preachment
on moral conduct
but a really roman-
tic entertainment.

sc " QDAY

Keep?

I '
I1'
l

With
MARJORIE DAW
NOAH BEERY
MARGUERITE
de la OTTE

"Wandering
Daughters"

these new popular leather goods.
There are handhags for the
women. tobacco pouches for
the men and purses "for both.
CALKINS-'FLETCHER DRUG COI

1'
I1

We

have a conplete line of

FOB SALE

SALE-Buick Four
eap for cash. Call
4, or at Daily office.

Roadster.
'Rockwell,
. lp-a

324 S. Mcate

FOR SALE-Chevroet Roadster, 1919.
Good condition. Wotderful bargain
for cash or terms. Call 18. 39-p
FOR SALE-Wheelock piano in ex-
cellent condition, with or without
inner attachment land high class
records. Fine for fraternities or
sororities. Telephone Mrs. Mitch-
ell, 2600. 38p-2
TYPEWRITERS
Typewriters of standard makes
bought, sold, rented, exchanged,
cleaned and repaired.
0. D. MORRILL
17 Nickels' Arcade Phone 1718
1-tfr
TYPEWRITING
TYPEWRITING AND MIMEOGRAPH-
ING promptly and neatly done.
Typewriters cleaned and repaired.
O. D. Morrill, 17 Nickels Arcade. tfr
STATIONERY
CLEARANCE SALE-Correspondence
stationery. All clean stock at less
than cost. O. D. -Morrill, 17 Nickels'

* REGINALD DENNY
OF THE POPULAR SERIES OF "LEATHER

IN A N
PUSH

EW ONE
ERS,

Cor. E. and S. University
Cor. 9. State and Packard

T h r ee D eependable

Stores

- - - -

Ii jI

CAMPING is certain to
be a source of irrita-
tion and regret unless
the tent is right. We
make tents that are easi-
ly put up and taken down,
and they "stay put" in
the w'orst weather. Low-
est prices.
"We Keep Out the Sun"
FOX TEXTILE CO.
Awnings and TVents
603 W. Michigan Ave.
Ypsilanti, Mich.

I

THEANNA RBOR DRESS
OFFICIAL PRINTERS TO THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN and
ITS STUDENT PUBLICATIONS

PRESS BLDG., MAYNAR D STREET

PHONE No. 1

Arcade. Open evenings.

tfr

LOST AND FOUND

ii

RUNNING DAY AND NIGHT

-A pair of tortoise shell
in Health Service case.
raper.1104.

glass-
Call
39-p-2

/

r fountain pen, Thursday
SName on barrell. Call
0 r 558. 31-p-16

THE ANN ARBOR pRESS

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