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August 07, 1923 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-08-07

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I

PROBABLY SHOWERS
TODAY

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DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

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TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 1923 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, VOL. XIV. No. 39 PRICE FI]

AT E CTEDI T MION0.O LONDONTO TALL HERE
TO GIVE LECTURE ON "FRENCH
IFOLK SWNGS," NEXT
HARDING FUNERAL

RATHER BE FARMER THA

SOLDIERS FROM OHIO RESERVES
CALLED OUT TO HANDLE
THRONG
CORTEGE TO ARRIVE IN
WASHINGTON TUESDAY

Sawyer and Geo. T. Harding to
fer With Mrs. Harding on
Burial Details

Con-

Marion, O.,. Aug. 6-(By A.P.)-Up-
wards of 100,000 persons are expect-
ed to fill this city to the point of ov-
erflowing Friday when last rites will
be accorded the late President Har-
ding.
To handle the anticipated throng or-
ders have been issued from here by
Adj. Gen. Henderson for the mobiliza-
tion of 3,000 soldiers of the United
States reserve forces of Ohio.
Motor to Marion
Hundreds , of persons motored to
Marion yesterday and early in the
afternoon Company D of Marion was
mobilized, the men being stationed at
points of Harding interest after sou-
venir hunters became so numerous
that such a move was deemed advis-
able to prevent destruction of pro-
perty.
No one will be permitted near thef
home of Dr. George T. Harding, Sr.,I
where the funeral of the late chief
executive will be held, the Harding
homestead in Mount Vernon Ave., the
"front porch" house, or the Harding
burial grounds.
Brother to Chicago
Dr. George T. Harding, Jr., brother
of the late president, and Dr. Carl
W. Sawyer, son of Brig. Gen. Saw-
yer, left here last night for Chicago,
where they expect to learn something
of the wishes of Mrs. Harding in re-
ference to funeral and burial arrange-
ments here.
Dr. Sawyer is expected to leave the
train at some point in northern Ohio
and return to Marion to carry out ar-
rangements desired by Mrs. Harding.
Plan Home Services
It is the hope of Drs., Sawyer and
Harding that Mrs. Harding will con-
sent to have the body of the president'
taken directly to the Marion county1
courthouse, when it arrives herel
Thursday, to lie in state from 10 a.
m.. to 4 p. m. Then it would be re-
moved to the home of the late presi-I
dent's father, where, according to
tentative arrangements, funeral serv-
ices would be held Friday morning
The funeral cortege on its way to
the cemetery wll pass the 1Marion Star
office, the newspaper which President
(Continued on Page Four)
Sink Back From West
Charles A. Sink, secretary of the
School of Music and Mrs. Sink have
returned from a seven weeks' trip to
California and Alaska. Mr. Sink will
resume his work immediately in the
office of the School of Music.,

--. E. Moore, senior modern lang-
uage master at the Ilseworth County
school, London, will lecture Thursday
evening, Aug. 9; in the Natural Sci-
ence auditorium on "French Folk
Songs." Mr. Moore is visiting a num-
ber of American universities this sum-
mer in order to acquaint himself with
the situation of modern language
studies in our schools and universities
and to confer with our teachers on
methods of teaching. He will discuss
questions of modern language teach-
ing before the students in the teach-
ers' course in French.
OFFICALS TO -MEET
Washington Makes Preparations For
(State Funeral Ceremonials,
Wednesday
CITY DRAPED IN MOURNING,
AWAITING HARDING TRAIN
Washington, Aug. 6-(By A.P.)-
The military and civil honors of a
great nation in sorrow and prayer will
be paid to the memory of President
Harding in the state funeral ceremon-
ials here tomorrow and Wednesday.
Preparation for the saddest cere-
mony in the life of the country since
the martyred McKinley was brought
here from Buffalo 22 years ago were
completed today under the guidance
of President Coolidge.
Tonight the National capitol draped
in mourning, awaited in grief the ar-
rival of the funeral train.
President Coolidge, cabinet mem-
bers, Chief Justice Taft and Senator
Cummings of Iowa, President pro tem-
pore of the Senate, will meet the
train as it dravis into the Union sta-
tion at 1:30 o'clock. Members of the
guard of honor: soldiers, sailors and
marines,1 will remove the body from
the car and bear it to a black draped
caisson at the entrance to the Presi-
dent's room.
Harding Service at 3 P. M.
Washington, Aug. 6-(By A.P.)-'
Announcement\ was made here late
today that funeral services for the
late President Harding in Marion Fri-
day will begin at 3 o'clock, central
standard time.
Townsend to Funeral
Jackson, Aug. 6-(By A.P.)-For-
mer Senator Charles E. Townsend and
Mrs. Townsend will leave Jackson to-
morrow for Washington to attend the
funeral of the late President Harding.

Henry Clay once remarked, "I'd rather be right than president." H
America's new president, has gone hi m one better. He has indicated tha
dent. And now he's both. Coolidge took his course in agriculture on his
he has done everything from milking the cows to making hay.

JOURNALISM CLASSI
TO HER KIRKLANDI

Noted Moving Picture Director
Speak Here Tomorrow
Morning

Will

"ART OF MOVING PICTURES"
TO BE SUBJECT OF TALK
David Kirkland, of Los Angeles,
well-knownbmotion picture director,
wIl speak before Professor Brumm's
class in written criticism at 9 o'clock
Wednesday morning, in room 207, Un-
iversity hall. His subject will be "The
Art of the Photo-play". The lecture
will be open to the university pub-
lic.
Has Directed Talmadge
Mr. Kirkland has just completed
"The Barefoot Boy", an adaptation of
John Greenleaf Whittier's poem. He
has directed Constance Talmadge in!
her more conspicuous successes, in-
cluding "The Temperamental Wife",
"The Love Expert", "In Search of al
Sinner", and "The Perfect Woman".1
He was also the co-author and ,co-di-
rector of "Reported Missing", apic-
ture in which Owen Moore carried
the leading part, and wrote the scen-1
arios for "At the Sign of the Jack
O'Lantern", by Myrtle Reed, "A Spin-
ner in the Sun", also by Myrtle Reed,
the screen version appearing under,
the title of "A Veiled Woman", andl
"The Ladder Jinx", adapted from a1
short story of the same name.
HEATING TUNNEL ORK
PROGRESSING RAPIDLY

crete work, the end of the tunnel will
be closed up with brick work, awaiting
the time for the laying of the heating
pipes throughout the entire tunnel,
most of which will take place some-
time this fall, in preparation for the
heating of two of the new buildings
of the campus, the east engineering
shops and the model high school.
Smaller heating branches will be
constructed from the main tunnel
across East University avenue to the
east engineering building, and across
South University, avenue to the new
high school to provide for their heat-
ing. Later, when the new Law club
and dormitory is completed, a similar
tunnel will be extended to this build-
ing.
VAN YNE T TLK ON
IM IN OINDIAN POLITICS TODAY
SPEAKER iAS BEEN IN CLOSE
TOUtil WITH CONDITIONS
IN INDIA

PRESIDENTL
GICAGO GREET
HRDING TRA1
.10,000 PEOPLE WAIT EN'
AFTERNOON IN GARY,
INDIANA
. ARRIVES IN STATION
OVER TWQ HOURS L
Spectators Line Thirty Mile Roe
C "Cars Through City; Crowd
Varied
Chicago, Aug. 6-(By A.P.)-
Harding funeral train fromSan
cisco arrived at the Kedzie A
station of the C. & N. W. railw
_ the western part of the city t
at 5:50 o'clock, Central time,
hours and twenty minutes b
time. One of the largest throngs
has gathered in Chicago in
. years was massed about the' sI
and along the tracks.
There were no accurate esti
of the number in the mass of ht
ity that wad literally packed and
med along the tracks for se
miles. There were other thousa
small crowds assembled at other
tage points along the C. & N. W
B. & O. railroads. Reports rea
Ohio stated that people by the
sands had been waiting virtual
afternoon at various Indiana t
It was said nearly 10,000 person
stood and watched at Gary, In
since 1 p. m.
Brother Joins Train
Abdard the train with the mou
party and the body of the Pre
I c was right, But Calvin Coolidge, was Dr. George T. Harding,
t he'd rather be a farmer than presi- brother of the President, Dr. Ca
father's farm near Plymouth where Sawyer,- of Marion, Ohio, son of
adier-General Charles M. Sawyer,
sonal physician to the President
----------------- had been taken from Chicago
morning on a special train v
met the funeral train at Dixon,
The party was met here by a
cial Aldermanic body and heade
state officials who had been stat
B at the Kedzie Avenue' stattion t
aboard with a great white wreal
roses and lilies. A dirge .of
Fraternity House Blaze Causes 80 and sounding of steamboat sirens
Lo Bs; Personal Property heard as the train slowly p
Burnt through the western section of C
R HOUSE LOSES go. Salutes of 21 gns were fire
M EMBERYOF INO F LOSEIS R the 122nd and 124th Field Artil
EVERYTHING IN HIS ROOM Illinois National Guard. Except
this mournful sound, the city was
Fire, believed to have been caused by usually quiet.
defective wiring, gutted the second and Crowd Silent -
third floors of the Chi Phi fraternity The same silent, refraining
house at 314 North Ingalls street, late tude hgas observant here to a la
yesterday afternoon, causing a loss es- degree than had been observed s
imated at $8,000. the train left San Francisco n
The blaze started in the second 2000 miles from Chicago with its
floor room in the northeast corner of cious burden last Friday night.
the building and spread rapidly be- though there were many of highJ
fore being detected by the occupants. in the community, the crowd se
By the time the' fire department ar- just a mass of humanity of whon
rived' the entire rear part of the business and working men were
structure was a mass of flames and it med one against the other.
vas only by hard work on the part Within the crowds .along the t
of the firemen that the blaze was were virtually all of the num
kept from gaining headway in the races and more than a score of
front of the building. tionalities that make up the city'
Clothing Destroyed pulation. Through the, localities
Besides the loss, to the building and Bohemians, Polish, Jewish, It
furnishings clothing and other person- Turkish, Armenian, Dutch, and
al property valued at more than $1,000 national origins who have becom
was destroyed. One member of the onized, the scenes were muc
fraternity, Howard Ruh, '25, lost ev- same. People stood in solid b
erything in his room, including $25 in watching silently, respectfully,
cash which had been placed in a desk thoughtfully as the train of m

drawer. ing passed.
The house was recently sold to the Halts Eight Minutes
Delta Tau Upsilon fraternity and Chi The brief halt at the Kedzie Av
Phi had planned to move soon to station to'receive the Chicago de
temporary quarters at 725 Haven tion and its floral offering requi
street, while their new house o- minutes and at 5:58 central tim(
Washtenaw avenue was being built. train moved out of the station b
for the Wood Street station near
Alaska :overnor Collapses and Rockwell streets where the
Juneau, Alaska, Aug. 6.-Overcome was turned over to the B. & O.
by emotion, Gov. Scott C..Sone, broke way. That railway ordered out
down and was unable to read a pre- engines to pull the train eastwa
pared statement eulogizing the late The route of the funeral train
President Warren G. Harding at a ered approximately. 30 miles v
Memorial service held yesterday under the city limits. Along .this long si
the auspices of, the dhurches of Ju- of track there were few places v
neau. spectators were not out in nun
Because of the greater crowds i
Army Medie Dies western part of the city, other
Los Angeles, Aug. 6.-Brig. Gen. Ed- sands in lesser throngs had go
ward B. Mosely, 77, retired United the far south side as far as 95th
States army physician, died here yes- where the B. & 0. runs in a s
terday after an illness of several easterly cirection through South
months. General Mosely served in the cago and ,the Calumet industrial
.army 30 years, much of that time in ion with its flaming furnaces
frontier campaigns and in the Phil- belching stacks.
lippines. (Continued on Page Four)

"Future Of American Drama
In Hands Of Little Theater"
-DEAN

"It is up to the teachers and direc-
tors who go out into small towns and
communities to make the drama a vi-
tal and living function in the lives
of people who have too little in their
lives now," declared Alexander Dean,
THE POOR LITTLE
POLAR BEAR.

director of the Little Theater of Dal-
las, Texas, in his lecture on "School
Dramatics as a Community Asset" last
evening in Natural Science auditor-
ium.
"If present conditions continue the
same during the next fifteen years;
there will be five or six cities which
will be the great theatre centers of
the country and the small towns will
suffer by not having dramatics suit-
able to their conditions," he continued.
"The theatres of New York have a
transient trade. People attend the
popular and not the worthwhile
theatre as a rule, and unless the lit-
tle theatre upholds the true spirit of
the Drama, then it will die."
The speaker closed by saying that
the commercial theatre is beginning
to awake to the tremendous possibil-
ities of the Little Theatre and that
the future of the drama in the Unit-
ed States is in the hands of the teach-
ers and directors who go into small
communities to institute dramatic or-'

Prof. Claude H. VanTyne, of the his-
tory department will be the speaker
this afternoon on the summer school
lecture to be given in the ;auditorium
of the Natural Science building. He
will speak on "Reminiscences of In-
dian Politics."
In view of the fact that Professor
Van Tyne is considered one of the
finest historians in the United States,
and also because he has just returned
from an. extended trip in India, his
lecture will be of great interest. Go-
ing to India upon the invitation of one
of the high officials of the government,
he was given every chance by the Brit-
ish government to study the problem
at close range. He had very close
personal contact with Ghandi the
great revolutionist, and was availed in
every way of an opportunity to thor-
oughly acquaint himself with the sit-
nation. Since his return to this coun-
try, he has written a book as yet un-
published, on his observations while
in India.
London's Harding Memorial
London, Aug. 6.-A memorial service
for the late President Harding will
be held in West Minster Abbey at noon
today by the American aibassy;

Away up north away from
its papa with nothing but
snow, ice and fish to live
upon. Its desires are never
fulfilled. You are lucky; just
CALL
JIMMIE
THE AD. TAKER
960

ONLY HALF BLOCK OF EXCAVA-
TION WORK REMINING TO
BE DUG
Work on the new University heat-
ing tunnel is progressing rapidly, ac-
cording to the foreman in charge of
the project, and within another week.
the excavation work will be complet-
ed. At present, the excavation has
reached a point in front of President
Burton's home leaving less than a half
block to the intersection of Oakland
and South University avenues, to be
completed.
After the completion of the con-1

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