100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 03, 1923 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-08-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

OF THE

ping except Monday
sion.
'ated Press. The As-
dvely entitled to the
all news dispatches
otherwise credited in
news published here-

profession many measures have been
taken to elevate it to the highest
professional plane. Realizing the,
handicap which age works upon the'
dramatic performer, a wealthy New
York philanthropist has left several
million dollars to establish a home for
aged, indigent, and infirm members
of the dramatic profession.
The University of Wisconsin has
announced that their curriculum in-
cludes ; 950 courses given by 1,047
professors and instructors. We won-
'der how this compares with our own
figures.

comprehension to most of us, but to
men and women who have suffered
the hardships of war-time strife, and
even more strenuous times since the
war, the shores of America are a
promise of something more than filth
and drudgery.

Text Books and Supplies for All Colk

r

Anti Arbor,
ter.
nail, $t.5..
wilding.

D OLL
EVER SEE A
SNAKE DANCEg

17

. GRAHAM'S-Both Ends of the Diagonal

1

6

S ev
Edi

'idence of
e Summer Henry Ford's confession of "ignor-
tono cn- ance" in a few specified lines is a
mitted in great -satisfaction to many who have
ter. The
endorse 'formed their own opinions of the
mmunica- gentleman's mentality.,

Telephones 24s4 and 176-M
MANAGING ZDITOR
HOWARD A. DONAHUE
itr ............... William Stoneman
a ...............Paul I, instein
ditors............Nathan Davis
Robert G. Ramsay.
Assistants
Ileidemann Ada Phelps
t Geddes Andrew I. Propper
[eraperRegina Reichman
SMargaret Stuart
Moran Lucy Tolhurst
oyer Matilda Rosenfeld
BUSINESS 'STAFF
Telephone 96o
BUSINESS MANAGER
1 F, BEAUMONT PARKS
ng.............Hiel M. Rockwell
'.o....D. L. Pierce
. ........A. S. Morton-
n .............John C. Hariu
Assistants
Sartholomew George Stracke
e S. Griffiths Johxn A. Barrett

FRIDAY, AUGUST 3,,1923
Editor-ROl1ERT G. RAMSAY
N FEAR, OF OURSELVES
seems, to me," remarked a wise
ntleman, "that the young peo-
this generation .are afraid of
elves." The present generation
een charged with everything
ig from corruption to insanity,
ere was a new one,- we are
of ourselves.
.old phllospher continued, "You'
isily notice that the man or wo-
of .the present hates solitude
all seek crowds. They are afraid
afone with themselves for even
uite."
baps there is some truth in the
tion. Solitude for the average
gent man or woman brings with.
communion and induces a rath-
t cal self-examinat'ion. We are
In a fast age. Look at the front
of the morning paper; what a.
h panorama it unfolds! Inter-
al complications, coal strikes,
dozen calamities in a single day
ported in the pages of the press.\,
e seething crowd keeps on in
ss hurry without a single mo-
>f deliberate thought.
iluable habit to acquire is the
aside of an hour a day for
illity and meditation. An hour
ch a can can retire to some se-
ace and there take stock of his
ces, revise his aims, reloc4te
,I and gather new vision on men

YESTERDAY
By SMYTIIE
Now France is Satisfied
The' British Parliament has con-
cluded its session after a period of
tense anxiety which culminated in the
'resentation of the French and Bel-
gian attitudes toward the proposed
Ruhr policy of Prime. Minister Bald-
win and hi sclblnet. Two weeks of
waiting, while the world looked on
and now the whole mess is more puz-
zling than ever. The communications
from France and Belgian made no al-
lusion to the joint note which was the
purpose of the entire negotiations as
first conceived by the British gov-
ernment. Generalities alone were
treated, and these in a manner just
contrary to the original intent.
General satisfaction and a certain
amount of pride fills the French pop-
ulace today, who feel that they have
"called the bluff" which so ignored,
the interests of France. For a mo-
ment, we hoped that there' was a
chance of Poincare realizing that noth-
ing but tactful diplomacy and seas-
onable consideration for Germany's
ability to pay could ever secure the
republic its full share of reparations.,
He- evidently did not, and we shall
soon see whether he was right in
thinking he could get what he wants
by insonsiderate action which is, in
the last analysis, nothing short of hos-
tility.
Britian has but one course of action
left, if the French attitude of indiffer-
ence to constructive methods of ob-
taining retaliation persists. She can
act alone and will undoubtedly, in so
doing, make a marked progress in
stabilizing the economic system of,
Germany. France will 'not concede
'the fact that recompense can be se-
cured through constructive as well
as destructive means; they think that
such a suggestion is a joke intended
to lure them into aiding England's
future in the field of commerce. The
Frenchman ought to learn to use his
sense of humor where it belongs and
to cultivate a capacity to distinguish,
not alone' between right and wrong,
but between good and bad intent.
The President's Job-He Has One
Washington breathes once more
'with the news that President Harding
has passed the crisis and is gaining
health. The anxiety of the whole cap-
ital has ,been aroused by the last two
days reports concerning the chief ex-
ecutive's condition. Politics.were for-
gotten, animositieg set aside, differ-
ences over policies ignored while not
only Washington but the whole nation
'stretched forth a hand of sympathy to
the President.'

Jlttv~le Jottings
Mrs. rnest Lee has bought a little
Glutonese pup to protect the house.
They better watch out or someone
will make a mistake and kill it with
a fly swatter.'
A dealer was trying to Sell Sl
Pumkinickle a mule the other day' but
Si woldn'tlissen to him. He says
"Don't ketch me buying no animal
which it takes 20 of them to haul one
of them little packages of Borax, no-
siree!"
Mr. Bill Haystack went into the
'City tother day an' he sure fooled
some of them slick city fellers. He
bought a solid hunk of gold, bout the
size and shape of a brick, for $20.
Why gold is worth almost that an
ounce!.
Today's Free Verse
I 'was
Going to buy'
Myself 'a
Handkerchief
A few hours ago.
I went
Into a store
Where they sell
Such things,
And asked
To see some of
Their
Holeproof Hankies
The price was two-bits
Per.
I walked out
Without a hanky.
It was too much'
To blow in.
Rakio.
Somebody asked us the other 'day if
veni, vidi, vici was one of them Har-
vard classical yells. Gosh! What
would you say? We almost did.
TARIK.
EDITORIAL COMMENT
OVERWORKED PRESIDENTS

thronging population, and should be
abolished. The unescapable work of
the President in Washington' is in-
creasing, and is enough to test the
strongest physique. We have got to
make up our minds to allow him to
grapple with that .immense labor, as
best he can, without expecting him
every now and then to exhaust himself
in visiting arious parts of the coun-
try, At least that burden can be
spared our overburdened Presidents,.

F00 D always tastes
nuch better if the
surroundings areright.
There is no pleasanter
place in Ann Arbor in
which to eat than
TUTTLE'S LUNCH
ROOM
MAYNARD STREET

Get gooa values cheap, thru
Classified columns.-Adv.

...... .

it.!

I.

the

Patronize The Daily advertisers.
DETROIT UNITID LINES
ANN ARBOR TIME TABLE
Eastern 'Standard Time'
(Effective July zo, 1923)Dr -
Limited and Express Cars to Detroit
-6:oo a.m., 7 oo a 9.., '8:oo a.n., ,9:05
a.m. and hourly' until' 9:oS- p.m.
Limited' Cars to Jackson-8:47 a.m.,
10:47 a.m., I2:47 P.m.,2:47 p.m., 4:47
rp.m., 6:47 p.m., 8:47 P.M.
Express Cars to Jackson (Local stops
west of Ann Arbor)-9:47 a.m. and
every two hours until 9:47 p.m.
Local Cars to Detroit-7:00 a.m.,
8:s5 am. and every two hours until
8.5s p.m., ix, :oo p.m. To Ypsilanti
o nly- 11: 40p.m., t1:15 .a. m.-
Local Cars to Jackson-7:So a.m.
and then 12:io a.m.
Connection 'made at 'Ypsilanti to
Saline, and at Wayne to Plymouth and
Northville.
FOR YOUR
FO-UNTAI1N'
Onany
WATERMAN,-
CONKLIN,
Sheaf fer v
Parker ,
Moore, Dumn
or other pen
0. D.MORRILL
17 NICKELS ARCADE '
The Typewriter ad Slatioie *-
Store
OPEN EVENINGS
- L

'rHrirnrrNtlrrrnr rt rttnrr rrnrnrrinnnnlirnrtittrnunrrrrrirnrnunrrnnnn
M '
.r
-
' W s LAUNDRY
#ITE, WAN C

Lau*nderers, Cleaners
Dyers, Pressers
Cents' Suits.. $1.25
Ladies' Suits .......$1.50 up
ONE DAY SERVICE ON REQUES
- PHONWE 165
unl 11111111111 111111 [1111111111 111 11111 1111 trtrtt itiII II 11111 1111111111 III III

Farmers & Mc
Bank

,.

-TWO OFFICEs-
101-1055. Main St. 30S. Sts
Nickel's Arcade

I

V

4
DAily Excursion to
80c ne Round Trip $..25 Sundays
Wdy (Return Same Day) Holidays
Leaves letroi t Daily 9 a. m. (E. T.)
The finest exclusive excursion steamer, the Put-in-Bay, noted for
its large ballroom, makes this trip a memorable one. Orchestra and
dancing aboard, without extra charge. Cafeteria aboard.
Four hours crammed with outdoor pleasures at P'tt-in-Bay-bathing-dancing-
ves fo h and athletic fields. See the wonderful Caves, and Perry's
ot: iment.
Connections at Put-in-Bay with steamers for Cleveland. Toledo and Lakeside.
Daly to Sandusky
The Put-in-Bay mas the run through to Sandusky every day. Fare-$1.50
one way.
Special Friday Excursions to Cedar Point
tspecialexcursion is made every Friday to Ceda Point-the fresh water rival
to Atlantis City -thre finest bathing beach in the world-large summer hotels,
groves, and all outdoor amusements. Four hours at Cedar Point and seven
"ouset Pt-in-Bayl Leaving Cedar Point at 5 m. and Put-in-Bay at 7 p., n-;
arriveac in Detroit 10-30 p. m. Fare-Cedar Point, $1.50 round trip; Put-i-
Bay, 80 cents.
Dancing Moonlghts Write for Map Folder
Leaves Detroit 8:¬Ęs . 5Ashley & Dustin
Sun. and Holidays75c. Steamer Line
Foot of First Street
Detroit, Mich.

BLASTERS OF COACHING
.en Coach Yost inaugurated the
School for Coaching 'at Michigan
ummer the innovation was look-
on as something which would in
years command nation-wide at-
n. Today marks the closing of
econd successful~ season in the
of physical education and coach-
nd already our youngest addition
I University's curriculum is prais-
om coast to coast. Since its in-
ion last year, the enrollment In
department has increased over
r cent, now totaling about 150.
e indomitable spirit which has
our pioneer coach a reputation
winning teams has something
.etic about it and those who leave
today after six weeks of enjoy-
and interesting instruction are
r able to understand that inex-
ible "something" which earned
ry Up" Yost his name. Michi-
athletic record of the past sea-
spoke well for the coaches who
our championships possible, and
instruction so sincerely and ap-
atively received bears fruit, the
ing high school and college teams
ghout' the country will be those
ted by men who learned their'
" here.
Is, project has been added to
gan's tole of instructional activ-
with a permanent standing that
lready incited interest.in each of
8. states. Those who have con-
ted to its success can not be given
iuch credit for their efforts, for
gh them has Michigan been car-
where it otherwise would never

i
t
f
t
:
t

There is scarcely any doubt that
President Harding's breakdown was
due directly to the severe strain of his
trip. The number of speeches he has.
been called upon to deliver and his
lengthy itinerary have been a constant
drain upon his vitality. Those who
believe the position of chief executive
is aon easy job need only to examine
the lives of former presidents. Most
of them went into office strong and
hard working men. They came out
physically 'weakened. The job of
President seems hard enough without
'the additional strain of Presidential
tours.
The Race for Quarantine
We have many sorts of- races in this
country, everything from potatoe to
balloon races, but the one which oc-
curred off the Long Island coast on
Wednesday was unlike any of these.
A minute after midnight 10 liners set
out on a mad 'race for Quarantine,
each trying to land its portion of the
August immigration quota first. The
first three liners crossed the imagin'-
ary line within 30 seconds, thus assur-
ing their passengers of first attention
in the mad rush which began at Ellis
Island the following morning. The
enxiety to gain admittance to the

(New York Times)
It is scarcely open to doubt that
President Harding's breakdown was
directly due to the severe strain un-
der which he has been since he left
Washington on his trip to Alaska.
The mere figures of his itinerary,
with the number of speeches which he
has delivered, do not begin to tell the
whole story. There has been a con-
stant drain on his vitality through
the incidental demands made upon his
time and strength. He has,had to be,
as it were, always on exhibition.
Night or day, when curious and in-
considerate people called upon him to
show himself, he was expected to do
it. Broken sleep, interrupted meals
and devastated days have been his
steady portion. His innate courtesy
and anxiety to do any favor asked
of him, or suggested to him, have na-
turally added to the physical hazards
of his journey. That his power of re-
sistance was at last impaired is not to
be wondered at.
The result out to put an end to
the practice of calling upon Presidents
to tour the country. If they desire
to "do it of their own motion, they
should be subject to the veto of med-
ical authority. As we saw in the case
of President Wilson, and now see in
that of Mr. Harding, the risks are too
great for the chief executive to ex-
pose himself to them unnecessarily.
Most Presidents are beyond the prime
of physical vigor when'tehy take of-
fice. , Their health should be guarded
in every way, not needlessly imperiled.
What a young and robust man like
Theodore Roosevelt could do as Presi-
dent, without manifest injury, can-
not be done by men many years his
senior. The American people should
take the lesson to heart. They wish
to see the President in person on his
travels is natural, but it must be de-
nied in the future more than it has
been in the past if we are not to see
other heads of the State brealk under
the stress.
Occasional short trips away from
Washington for a specific purpose are
one thing. But long journeys amid
the hurly-burly of insistent crowds,
with a mistaken hospitality every-
where trust upon a wearied President,
are quite another. They represent an
old custom which is now out of date
in this. land of vast distances and

now"

f

. .

BIGGER THIS YEAR THAN EVER BE OI

LOT 1

U"

OFF

i

The balance of our entire line of mens and Young men's
25 % ff, 'Including Blue Serge" "Nothing Reserved"
is our way of cleaning house every season.

suits
This

I

AugstCearance Salej

Other
Savings

SHIRTS, Collar Attached, All Colors..............98c
ATHLETIC UNDERWEAR, $1.25 value..............79c
All STRAW' and SUMMER HATS, reduced.....331-3%
All BATHING SUITS, Men end Boy's reduced........20%
SOX, 6 pair guaranteed 6 months....................$1.50

s$
JCE WuertwU
FASHION PARK CLOTHIERS NEXT TO, WUERTI

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan