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July 31, 1923 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-07-31

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L. XIV. No. 33

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JULY 31, 1923

PRICE FIVE C

EVELOPMENT OF
G S HORN I N LECTUREI
RoF. C. 0. DAVIS OUTLINES
GROWTh OF SECONDARY
EDUCATION
kYS INFORMATION PLUSj
IDEALS IS OBJECTIVE'
eaker Declares That Material Gain
Come' From Advancement in
Education

Strike Predicted
As Mine Wage
Meet Breaks Up

FRENCH-'BELGAI NS
TO BRITISH NOTE
BALDWIN AND CURZON TERSE
IN SPEECHES BEFORE
PARLIAMENT
POINCARE STILL FIRM
IN REPARATIONS POLICY

Last Rehearsal For Choral Union

Concert To Be Held This Evening
By Margaret Stuart rapidly through the drama than the
The last rehearsal for the Choral music of it, but here we take leave
Union concert to be given tomorrow of the early music obscuring the con-
night, will be held in Hill auditor- poser's ideals. He shows in Lohen-
ium under the direction of George grin the perfect unity of all his lat-
Oscar Bowen. The chief number is er music-drama, and we find con-
to be the Choral Fantasia from the trasting themes of love and death, in
opera Lohengrin. It is the original music' interpretation-involving a
opera of Richard Wagner and ar- harmonic range and variations diffi-

i
REOERN AFETEF
PRESIDENT RESPONDING T(
CAREFUL TREATMENT
AND REST

h

'ranted by Perev P_ FietehPr_ Tt in t

Entire Proceedings Cloaked by
gotiating Powers; No Let-
up Seen

Ne-

said that in this work Wagner's in-
tellectual power developes far more
4TH SECTION LEAVES
FOR FRE'SH AIR CAMP

"Democracy is the significance of
the entire American educational move-
ment," declared Prof. C O. Davis in
his lecture on "The Development and
Significance of the Public High
School" yesterday afternoon.
Professor Davis began his lecture
by calling attention to the fact that
young men are prone to be looking
forward to ideals, while old mnen are
continually pointing back to the good
old dys when they were boys, as if
all' good thngs had been left be-
hind." "But," continued Professor
Davis, "I beieve that the golden age
is now. Never- have we advanced as
much as we have today. Much of
our material advancement is due to
our educational development.",
In tracing the history of secon-
dary schools, Professor Davis started
with our forefathers who came over
to America in the great puritan wave
and settled around Boston in 1629.
"They were for ,the most part, edu-
cated men .who came here to work out
a. more perfect form of government
and society. ''In 1635, the Latin Gram-
mar school was established. It was a
select one, solely for specially gifted
boys, as girls were no considered
worthy of an education. Latin,
Greek, and mathematics made up the
bulk of the curriculum, other studies
were incidental. This Latin grammar
school still exists in Boston.
Aca demies Established
The second great period in the de-
velopment of schools was during the
revolutonary war. Opposition was
organized and the Academy movement
was established. These academies in-
cluded girls in their enrollment. By
1630, six thousand academies existed
in the United States. These scbooh
were n4t under public control, but
under a board of trustees, some of
whom were self appointed.
The third period of educational ad-
vancement, explained Professor Davis
is the development of our present lay
American high school. This marks
the introduction of history, English
and sciences into the school curricu-
lum.
As .a result of the civil war, our
whole life was changed. Our main
occupation had been agriculture be-
fore the ware, but after it, industry
grew, towns and cities were establish-
ed, wealth accumulated, leisure fol-
lowed and an opportunity was of-
fered for a longer education of a
greater number of people. After
1860, the development of American
high schools was a rapid one in most
of -the larger cities.
With . the growth and progress of
universites, high schools also flour-
ished. As soon as women were ad-
mitted in universities, more girls us-
ed the high schools, continued Profes-
sor Davis. "Michigan was one of the
first Universities to open her doors
to women. On Jan. 5, 1870, the reg-
ents of the University of Michigan
voted to admit women, and on Feb.
2, Miss Stockwell of Kalamazoo ma-
triculated as the first woman. Today,
there are about 2600 girls on our cam-
pus."
Entrance Examinations Discourage
"Until 1871, no boy was admitted in
the University except by way of an
examination. What was .the affect?
It discouraged many individuals, and
tended to keep student qut. In 1871,
the certificate plan was adopted. Ex-
aminatiops were done away with, and
instead, professors were sent out to
visit and, inspect the high school to
be placed on the accredited list. Ad-
rian, Ann Arbor, Detroit, Flint and
Kalamagoo were the first five schools
to be placed on this list.
The high school was legally estab-
lished'in 1874, when the legality for

- S. I). Warriner
The country apparently faces a coal
strike in the anthracite fields Sept. 1
as a result of the failure of anthracite
operators and miners to reach an
agreement at the joint wage confer-
ence in Atlantic City. The conference
broke up when S. D. Warriner, spokes-
man of the operators, denied the de-
mands of the miners' union for com-
plete recognition and offered to submit
the question to arbitration. President
Lewis of the United Mine Workers an-
nounced further negotiations would be
futile.
'NINETY-ONE MKE
PU-N-A TIP
Excursionists Visit Perry's Mopument
and Famous Lake Erie
Caves
GEOLOGICAL FORMATIONS
INTEREST SIGHTSEERS
Ninety-one students returned with
Professor Rowe at 11 o'clock Saturday
night after a successful trip to Put-
in-Bay. The party left Ann Arbor at
6 o'clock Saturday morning and went
directly to But-in-Bay where they
spent four hours .visiting Perry's
'monument and the caves.
The smallest of these caves is Crys-
tal cave which is beautifully lined
with crystals. The other three caves
are famous for their stalactites and
stalagmites. . These are salt forma-
tions, the formerkeomig down from
the roofs of the caves in icicle shape
and the latter forming from the
ground upward in pyramid shape.
Mammoth cave is the largest of the
four caves,and Paradise cave has the
most interesting stalactites, some of
them being three feet long. Perry
cave was especially interesting be-
cause of the man at the wishing well
who offered each visitor a tin sause
pan of fresh water from the lake say-
ing "Take a drink and make a wish.
If it comes true, all right; if it doesn't,
all right."
Professor Rowe led his geology stu-
dents and any others who wished to
join him to the glacial grooves and the
rock faults on the shores of the lake.
GREEKS REPORTED TO
BE PLANNING EPUBIC
London, July 30.-(By A. P.)-- Re-
ports have reached the British gov-
ernment of an attempt to set up a
Republic in Greece in place of the
monarchy, Ronald MacNeil, under-sec-
'retary for foreign affairs, told the
house of commons this morning.
Mr. MacNeill's statement 'was in
replay to a statement from Command-.
er Kenworthy, Independent Liberal
member for Hull, who asked also for
information as to what part former
Premier Venizelos, General Pangalos,
former .Greek army commander-iin-
ichief, and Admiral Tadjikiriakos were
playing in the Republic movement.
London, July 30.-The Greek lega-
tion announced today that there is no
truth of a republic revolutionary

London, July 30--(By A. P.)-The
French and Belgian ambassadors this
evening handed to Lord Curzon, Sec-
retary of State for foreign affairs,
the replies of their governments to
the British note proposing negotia-
tions with Germany, to solve the prob-
lem of the Ruhr and the greater pro-
blem of Germai reparations.
This ended one chapter in the try-
ing negotiations. Premier Baldwin and
Lord Curzon both spoke briefly in
Parliament-the Commons and Lords
respectively-todaty on the proposi-
tion of the negotiations at that mo-
ment; both were terse; neither was
there any indication that Great Bri-
tain and France had drawn closer to-
gether.
France Remains Firm
No news had come across the chan-
nel that Premier Poincare has aban-
doned or even modified the views
which previously his government has
held to tenaciously and every princi-
ple has reiterated the plank in his'
platform that there will be no begin-
ning of conversation with Germany
until and unless Germany 'formally
denQunces passive resistance in. the
Ruhr and that there' will be no with-
drawal from the Ruhr until Germany
has paid France what she demands.
That seems to be the belief with
no minor concession that France and
Great Britain can bridge one out-
standing feature of this latest chap-
ter in allied nations. It has been en-
shrouded with the utmost secrecy.
Seldom have secrets been so exclus-
ive from foreign officers and cabinets
in half a dozen capitals. The Ital-
ian and German ambassadors also vis-
ited Lord Curzon but there is no
reason to believe that the German vis-
it was connected with reparations.
Italians "In Between"
It is not yet known whether the
Italian ambassador has given any'
written answer to the British note
although the Associated Press corres-
pondent says the Italian gocernment
has dispatched one which takes the
middle ground between the British
and French. Brussels advises say
that Belgium supports the plan
France formulated in the main but
that the Italian plan contains ele-
ments of a constructive plan which
in sonte respects go beyond the French
answer.
Presentation Of
"Twelfth Night"
Pleases Audience
Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night" was
presented last evening in University
Hall auditorium, by the class .in
Shakespearean reading, directed by
frn Glnr 'Wiln Tha eranta

Ninety-Four Boys Begin Two Weeks
Vacation at Patterson
Lake
SCARCITY OF FUNDS MAKES
LARGER GROUP} IMPOSSIBLE
Ninety-four boys from Detroit and
suburbs are today starting their ten
day outing at the University Fresh Air
camp on the shores of Patterson Lake.
This section, the fourth agd last sec-
tion of the camp, is the smallest of
the four which have been held this
year, the third section topping it by
35.1
Approximately 420 boys will have
been furnished with a ten day outing
when this section of the camp comes
to a close, according to Lewis C.
Reimann, '16, who has charge of the
Fresh Air camp. The camp will break
up Aug. 8.
The camp this year, situated for the
first time in its permanent location on
a site recently donated for it, has thus
far been the source of much enjoy-
ment and instruction to the numbers
of poor youngsters who have attend-
ed, it 'was declared. The boys, in ad-
dition to having a good time at the
camp, have been instructed in wood
lore by an Indian chief and taught
much about the' inhabitants of the
woods by "Dad" Lockwood, natural-
ist.
Funds for the camp this year have
been rather scarce, it being necessary
to hold a tag day recently on the cam-
pus which yielded slightly more than
$265. With this money the fourth sec-
tion of the camp was allowed to be
held, atlthough the section is not up
to the quota of the others that pre-
ceeded, due to the lack of sufficient
funds.
TO PUBLISH ACCOUNTING
Washington, July 30-(By A.. .)-
The bituminous coal operators rep-
resenting 75 percent of the country's
production today submitted a formal
offer to the Federal Coal Commission
to make public complete accounting
of costs, prices and wages in the in-
dustry, conducted voluntarily under
governmedt supervision.
The plan was outlined at an execu-
tive conference between the commis-
sion and a special committee of op-
erators, headed by John G. Bryton
President of the National Coal asso-
ciation. The committee also notifi-
ed the commission of completed plans
for distributing bituminous coal not-
ably for use as an ,anthracite substi-

scult to execute.
Since the dramatic value of Lohen-
grin is as highly praised as its music-
a summary of the plot will give more
interest to the concert. The story as
it comes down through -music is bas-
ed on two principa motives-the meta-
morphosis of human beings from
swans, and the curiosity of a wife
whose question brings disaster. The
Lohengrn legend is, localized on the
lower Rhine and it falls into sharp
division in the hands of the German
and French poets. By the Germans it
has been turned into mystical use, be-
ing attached loosely to the Grail leg-
ends.
Lohengrin, a brave knight, is guid-
ed on a quest by a swan who was or-
iginally his youngest brother compel-
led through breaking his golden. chain
to become a swan. The swan played
a part in classical myths as the bird
of Apollo, and in Scandinavian lore
the swan maidens having the gift of
prophecy appear again and again.
The wife's desire to know the origin
of her husband is a parallel of the
(Continued on Page Four)
,IN GOLF TOURNEY

I

IS REPORTED TO HAVE
BEEN CRITICALLY ILL
Late Bulletins Confirm Rumor That
Condition Is Regarded as
Serious
Presidential Headquarters, Palace
Hotel, San Francisco, July 30-(By A.
P.)-President Harding's illness res-
ponded today to careful treatment and
complete rest but his physician in a
statement issued tonight adnitted for
the first time that his condition was
serious. The bulletin ssued 'tonight
failed to bear out. the more optimis-
tic report which had come from the
President's sick room during the af-
ternoon.
He noted only a slight increase
in temperature and a rapid rise of
pulse and respiration and moreover
he said that there was evidence of
congestion in one lung whereas the
physician's statement issued shortly
before noon described the lungs as
clear. The most encouraging feat-
ure of tonight's statement was that
the chief executive had taken some
nourishment and had been fairly
comfortable during the day. The bul-
letin issued after an hour's consul-
tation by the physicians was as fol-
lows:
"The President's condition is as
follows: Temperature 100, 6-10, pulse
125, respiratiog 44, and somewhat ir-
regular. There is some cough and
evidence of congestion in one lung.
He has taken more nourishment and
except for weakness and restlessness
he has been fairly comfortable dur-
ing the day though his condition is a
serious one."

Stands
in

Fourth At End of First
State Open Meet; Leads
Amateurs

Day

WILL DEFEND AMATEUR
LAURELS ON WEDNESDAY
(Special-to The Daily)
Grand Rapids, July 30.- Carlton
Wells, instructor in the rhetoric de-
partment of the University of Michi-
gan, and Michigan state amateur golf
champion led the amateurs at the end
of the first day's play in the Michigan
state open golf tournament being play-
ed here.
Three Detroit professionals better-
ed Well's total in the play today.
Wells -had a total of 153 against 147
for Mike, Brady, 149 for Harry Hamp-
ton, and 150 for Al Waltroux.
University of Michigan students
showed up well in the~first day of com-
petition. Alexander B. Quirk and Dan-
iel T. Quirk, both University of Mich-
igan freshmen, tied 'at 164. M. S.
Crosby, former member of the Mich-
igan Varsity golf team had a total of
166, Hugh Smith, captain of last year's
squad, had a total of 168, and John
Winters 173."
Wells was particularly effective in
his long drives and his iron shots.
His putting was uncertain although it
was partly compensated for by two
long shots from the edge of the green
in the afternoon's play.
Another 36 holes medal play will
be played Tuesday afternoon to de-
cide the state open champion,. Wells
will defend his amateur title begin-
ning Wednesday morning when the
state amateur tourney is commenced.
From today's showing he is expected
to retain his honors.

RUFUS WILL TALK
ON KOREA TONG

I,

Interesting Slides to be Shown in
Connection With Lec-
ture
SPEAKER HAS LIVED FOR
TEN YEARS IN FAR EAST
Prof. Carl W. Rufus, of the astron-
omy 'department, will lecture on "A
Pictorial Survey of Korean Civiliza-
tion'? this afternoon at 5 o'clock in
the auditorium of the Natural Science
.building.
The lecture will be illustrated and
will cover the historical development
of Korean civilization for over 4,000
years. Professor Rufus will first take
up the survivals of the earlier types
of Korean civilization and trace their
evolution through the various periods
of history.
Having been a member of the facul-
ty of Chosen Christian college in Seul,
Korea, for ten years, Professor Rufus
availed himself of the opportunity to
collect a number of remarkable slides
showing Korean life. The collection
includes the oldest examples of orient-
al art found in China and Japan prop-
er, the oldest iron-clad battleship, typ-
ical Korean palaces, and numerous
slides of the home of the old Korean
emporer.
DIPLOMA ENDS 70 YEAR
GRIND OF "COLLEGE BOY"
East Liverpool, O., July 30-(By A
P.)-Frank I. Weaver, at the age of
81, has just finished his-college course
which he started at Mt. Union Col-
lege, Alliance, O., 70 years ago.
According to word received here,
Mr. Weaver, a former local resident,
but who now live sat Salina, Kans.,
was granted a degree in electrical
engineering during the June com-
mencement exercises. at the Univer-
sity of Kansas.
Mr. Weaver has not let it be known
what use he will make of his new

iP-rot eorgew er. e pres a- tute, in the event of a strike in the
tion marked the annual summer recit- anthracite region. Veterans Start Membership Drive
al of the class. Mr. Bryton later said sufficient Detroit, July 30-(By A.P.)-Lee
Members of the class took the parts quantity of low-volatile bituminous Abbey and James O'Neill, organizers
of different characters in each act, could be reduced to take the place for the Veterans of Foreign Wars,
all of the class members thus get- of anthracite supply in an emergency take off today from Packard field
ting an opportunity to show their and that operators in turn would opening a statewide membership drive
wares. agree to the control of prices by the- for 5,000 new members for the or-
Considering the time spent in pre- government. Should bituminous min- ganization.
paring for the play and the inex- ers be called out in sympathy with The fliers plan to visit Flint, Sag-
perience of the class as a whole, the anthracite workers, he declared non- inaw, Bay City, East Tawns, Alpena,
play was presented in a creditable union bituminous mines together with Boyne City, Traverse City, Cadillac,
manner. All of the actors gave pleas- those in the territory where miners Muskegon, Kalamazoo and Jackson.
ing interpretations of their parts and can be afforded ample protection un- Literature will be dropped over each
put the idea of the play over to the der the existing laws would be able city, explaining the advantages of
audience, although they had neither to furnish the country an adequate membership in the V. F. W.
costumes nor scenery to aid them, supply of coal.
Australians Down Hawaiians
Four Killed in Quebec Crash Molla to Meet Helen Wills South Orange, July 30-(By A.P.)-
Quebec, July 30-(By A.P.)-The Rye, N. Y., July 30-(By A.P.)-The J. O. Anderson and J. B. Hawks, Aus-
Edmundson-Quebec express No. 34 scheduled star match between young tralians, defeated ,W. A. Eckland and
crashed into a way freight from Char- Helen Wills of California and Molla Bowie Rietrick, of Hawaii, in straight
nay, near Picard, on the Transcon- i Mallory, the' American women's ten- sets in the doubles. of the American
tinental railway, 100 miles east of nis champion was postponed again zone Davis cup play at the Orange
Quebec. Four trainmen were killed Sunday on account of rain. The match Lawn Tennis club Sunday.' The scores
and several other persons injured. will be staged next Sunday. were:-6-0, 8-6, 7-5,

I

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