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July 29, 1923 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-07-29

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er nrtmsn irmy nicer
Discusses Indian Situation
ool Student Who Served in Army of India Answers Article
ten by Indian Student Which Appeared in Last Sun-
day's Issue of The Summer Michigan Daily
(By J. 'C. Heraper)

I smell the blood
Th's phrase from

an!" '

nursery tale has of late been
t irresistably into my mind. It
A until I left my own country
,me over to America that II
"ealized what a nation of self-
and tyrants I belong to. AsI
t of readingtseveral recent ar-
n the press, I feel there is no
alternative but for me to gol
nearest county court and to
my natonality. I read in al
per article that there wais a'
of pro-british propoganda
htout the United States, but in
>f careful perusal of papers
11 parts of the country, I have
to encounter any comments.
ble to the English. In the Sum-
aily we are held up by Smythe
osing the French policy in the
because we want profits, we,
glish, the only nation which is
ig its dept to the United States
face of the heaviest taxation
+d on any European country.
he British policy of govern-
n India has been attacked by
astapha Syed, who decides that
forms Act of 1919 is a miser-
ilure, atnd he' states that the
4 are pursuing a policy of self-j

quality with the ruling caste. An In-
dian was not allowed in the same
carriage; he was compelled to dis-
mount from his horse when passing.
an Englishman, and he lowered- his
umbrella out of respect. The govern-
nient of the country was zelously re-
stricted to the English, and the In-
dian had no control pf affairs. But,
on the other hand, there was some
justification for this. We stepped in-
to a country distraught with intern-
al disorder; any invader from the
north could destroy aid pillage the
countryside without fear of concert-
ed resistance from the inhabitants.-
The history of India prior to the ad-
vent of the English shows a series of'
invasions, raids by the peoples of one
province against another, rapid ris-
es to power of native despots, and
equally rapid declines from power.
In fact, India as a country was but
a name, and the people by virtue of
their numerous religions and castes
were unable to defend themselves.
Vast Improvements Introduced
What a different state of affairs now
prevails, or I must qualify this state-
ment, how great has been the de-
velopment of the country from the
point eel view of western civilization.

It is the' failure of the native to
show the necessary qualities for suc-
cessful government that preyents thej
English adopting any but gradual re-1
forms into the existing system. The
Indians are, as a mass, une(lucated
and thus they are easily swayed by
the inflammatory speeches of unscrup-
plous agitators, who realize the un-
controllable power of the mob. Var-
'ious acts have been passed, as men-
tioned in Mr. Syed's article, to con-
trol this type of agitation and which
cannot be repealed -and at the same
time maintain law and order. Legit-
imate free speech has always been
the slogan of the English, and in
their anxiety to allow the native self-
expression, the -government 'permnit-
ted agitation to reach undesirable
limits, which resulted in violence,
such as the Amritsar rising in 1919,
the Moplah rebellion of 1921, the dis-
turbances in Bombay, Madras, and
Calcutta during the Prince of Wales'
visit in 1921-22. The government was
compelled to take action, and they
arrested, the leading agitators, includ-
ing Gandhi, the Ali brothers, and Li-
la Rajput Rai.
The most significant fact to be'
gathered from these riots, beyond the
primitive passions betrayed by the
mobs in murdering isolated and un-
protected English subjects and by the
wholesale destruction of property,
was the hatred of the Hindus and
Mohammedans for one another. This
was particularly evident in the Mop-
lah rebellion when the Moplahs, who
are Mohamedans, raose up to cast off
English rule, but most of their viol-
ence was directed against the Hin-
dus and their property, in some cases
violating the sanctity of their temples.
There was some attempt by the agi-
tators to conceal these atrocities by
saying that the English had fabricated
the reports.
Enmity of Hindus and Mohamedans
The failure of the Hindus and Mo-
hamedans to combine has been tak-
en advantage of by the English gov-
ernment in deciding the composition
of Indian regiments. In the major-.
ity of these regiments both classes
are equally represented, and any at-
tempts to 'raise' dissesnion have been
counter-acted by the ill-feeling exist-
ing between the Hindusand Mohame-
dans I can give numerous cases of
this emly but laek of space pre-

vents a full treatment of the sub-
ject, and I will close with a few ex-
tracts from a report in the Londoni
Times of July 12 on a meeting of the
Legislative Assembly in India, a body
which corresponds with the House of
Rdpresentatives in America. The oc-
casion was the struggle of a number
of the Indian members to obtain the
release of the agitators who had been
stirring up the violent elements of
the Indian populace.
"The debate was remarkable for
another extraordinary mentality of
the minority-, who pressed for the re-
lease of men -avowedly hostile and
contemptuous of the Assembly and
pledged to wreck it.
"Mahatma Gandhi by his' policy of
non-cooperation advocated the des-
truction of all that went to make
modern India, such as' the abolition
of railways, schools, and courts.
"There are great fears of an out-
break during the next two weeks
between the Hindus and Mohamedans
in the Punpab."

E

,I

I-

11

Today Thru Tues.-
Lupino Lane in
"A FRIENDLY HUSBAND "
Paul Parrot in
"THE UNCOVERED WAGON"
Wed.-Thurs.-
Mabel 'Bailin in
"JANE EYRE"
Joe Rock Comedy
Constance Talmadge in
"A LADY'S NAME"
Century Comedy, "SWEET and PRETTY"

(alp1j

I'
I

VISIT historic
-. Ma er :avern -:-,
COR. CHICAGO AND MONROE PIKES
GateCay to Iris' :Hills
CH11CKEN DINNER ..:ETC

_ i

Today Thru Tues.-
Owen Moore in
"THE CHICKEN IN THE CASE"
Pathe Comedy
Wed.-Thurs.-
William Faversham in
"THE MAN WHO LOST HIMSELF
Bert Roach in "''WT YOU WORRY?"
Tri.-Sat.---
Tom Mix in
"ROMANCE LAND"
Stan Laurel in "CUFFS AKO COLLES

FACIAL HAIR
Removed Permanently by
ELECTROLYSIS
Electro-Cosmetic Servic
224 Nickel's Arcade

ration
No A
rica
iting-
SLon
rs an
'here
refu
the
srepr
cont
fe err
re, is
rt of
cinder

at the expense of the The English have appropriated huge
sums for the development of railways,
ttempt to Oppress the building of roads; they have con-
has always been the hap-' structed canals for irrigation pur-
ground of Indian agitat- poses and installed lighting plants,
adon was the refuge for 'fostered trade with foreign countries,
d conspirators from Rus- established universities, colleges and
is no official body over schools; church missions have set up
te the accusations brought their hospitals in all parts of the
English, and the Indians country, and they have done invalu-
esent our actions without able work in times of plague and
tradiction. We are prone famine without forcing their relig-
rors, as every country is, ious creeds' on the Indians. The, In-
no deliberate attempt on dian civil service, the Indian medical
England to keep the In-! service, and the Indian army have all
or to prevent his right maintained a high reputation for jus
ch. I will try' to explain tire, imp artialty, and 'strict devotion
e in India'towards the to duty.' These services were once
nation from n l hown e- exclusivey oficered by Englishmen,
n. that country, where I but now they. have been thrown: open

i11ii l llllillti li tlll l lt Iti lltlltti itttttltltt11111t11tl iitililitllillltlltlillllt
ou take you life
in. your hands
Starting Today
A PLAY MADE BY THE
DIRECTOR,OF "HUMORESQUE"
"CHILDREN Of DUST
with JOHNNIE WALKER
when you cross a crowded PAULINE GARON
street where the traffic en- LLOYD HUGHES
dangers and where you must ST KE
k'eep eyes and ears open every MNRMAID COMEDY "T1HREEscTWRpKEo
second. With a policy of our = -EMI OEY L'1LL
strongly protected accident in-
surance, you can cross any COMING
street with a feeling that your THURSDAY Johnny ine
loved are safe from want. IN A MILE A MINUTE COMEDY
BUTL E R "LUCK"
INSURANCE .
20,9 First Nat. Bk. Bldg.-Phone 401-f{,I lt itt lt lil ulit Illili l lll ll ili till tlllliillilllltlll 11

Iu

en years as an officer of
Army, and wiere I was
ito contact with 'every type
of Indian from the Brah-
e Madrassi Christian. Un-
y I am unable to challenge
n the results of the Reforms
19, hs I am not fully ac-
rith the bill.
>t be denied that the policy
tglish up to comparatively
.es was to treat the Indian
Iber of a subject race; he
son of inferior type and of
ation; and hd was not per-,
consider himself on an e-
ssitied Advertising
: Two cents per word
y, paid in advance; fif-
nts per reading line per
arged.

to Indians. The civil service and the
medical service were the first to re-,
ceive Indians into their. ranks, and
'this was done some years prior to the
war. At present Indians are under
trial to ascertain their ability to serve'
on the same footing with the English
officers in the army and certain regi-
ments have been selected to which
all Indians are sent, so that in the
course of time there will be only In-
dian officers in them, and a definite
comparison can be made between the
efficiency of the various units, anid al-
so with' the regiments officered by
Englishmen. This step was only tak-
en during the past year, and a col-
lege was recently opened at Dehra
Dun for the training of Indian ca-
dets. The Indianization of the gov-
ernment is being carried out gradual-
ly, and as the native demonstrates
his' capabilities of taking over the
control of his own country so is he
given increasing powers.

Wec recommend
Marinello Antiseptic
Bleach Lotion

and

for that disagreeable and
unsightly sunburn. We
also darry a full line of
AARINELLO Cosmetics.

For the Balance o the Summer

StUddard Hair Shoppe
707 N. University Ave.
MvAC
Wolf Lake Michigan's
most delightful Summer
:-: Resort :
An Ideal Place
To spend a day or week-end
or to get a
Frog and Chicken
Dinner
A pleasant motor trip of 28. miles from
Ann Arbor. Take highway M-17 to
Grass Lake. passing thru. turn left 4 1-2
miles (following signs) to. Mack Island.
Bathing, Boating, Fish-
ing, Dancing

The. Summer

Michigan

Daily

WILL BE 75 CENTS

'1 I

FOR SALE
LE- Ford Speedster-good
and tires, '$65.00. Call 2547-
LE-Eight double-deck beds
atresses, exceptional price.
094. 32
TYPEWRITERS
ers of standard makes
, sold, rented, exchanged,
d and repaired.
O. D. MORIULL
els Arcade Phone 1718
1-tfr
FOR RENT
NT - Furnished rooms forl
ousekeeping. 710 W. Liberty.
930-J. 31-2
LOST AND FOUND
-old bar stud with small chip
id at Observatory or between
vatory and Univeusity IHos-
Tuesday "night. Please call
30-p-

DETROIT UNITED LINES
ANN ARBOR TIME TABLE
Eastern Standard Time
(Effective July io, 1923)
Limited and Express Cars to Detroit
-6:oo a.m., 7:00 a.m., 8:oo a.m., 9:05.
a.m. and hourly until 9:,oS' p.m.
Limited Cars to Jackson- 8:47 a.m.,
10:47 a.m., 12:47 p.m., 2:47 p.m., 4:47
pm., 6:47 p.m.,' 8:47 p.m.
Express Cars to Jackson (Local stops
west of Ann Arbor)-9 :47 a.m. and
every two hours until 9:47 P.m
Local Cars to Detroit-7:oo a.m.,
8:55 a.m. and every two hours until
8:5s p.m., i: oo p.m. To Ypsilanti
Only--1 :49 p~m., 1 ;IS a.m.
Local Cars to Jackson-y :5o a m.
and then 12m:io...m.
Connection made at Ypsilanti to
Saline and at Wayne tr ylymouth and
N orthville. dlU
Get good values cheap, tbru the
Classified columnA.-Adv.

It is delivered

every.

morning

except Monday thruout the ses-
sion or mailed anywhere with-
out additional cost.
L Are there enough Dailies at
your house,? Make sure of

I

III

New Dinner-dance room may be
engaged by private parties, Reserva-
tions for dinners may be made by tele-
phone.
WILLIAM K. McINTYRE, Prop
GRASS LAKE

plenty, for they're only

75c,

T ..+ ci T-- +Ik, !o A+a lravOP #inrl It,

H

Let "Jnmmi me a the a u Uer una m;i
_ l.1111!(11111111 1 11111111111131 1111111111 1t111t1111111 111111 1111 1111 111 1111i 1i11
I WHITESWAN LAUNDRY CO.
I 2'umnrrsrB Cleaners

by calling _960-and ordlering:.
C. The Summer Daily has im-
portant notices in it-and also
important news.

-Ring set with two rubies and
opals. Thursday afternoon. Call
31-2
-Rider fountain pen, Thursday
noon. Name on barrell. Call
s, 960 or 558.A U 31-p-16
MIS5CE~LLANEO01S

Dyers, Pressers -::
Cents' Suits. ...........$1.25
Ladies' Suits.....$1.50 up
QNE DAY SERVICE ON REQUEST
PHONE 165
nnusasmtiauuniti uni nuuuunui n uuuliHuuH i uul~l niui n ,uIilnuillil

...
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.,.
..

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