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July 29, 1923 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-07-29

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4

Ammer

ILK
WIERS

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ASSOCIATE
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHlT
SERViICE

TODAY

... {
I

IV. No. 32 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY JULY 29, 1923 PRICE FIVE

CONFERENCEj
H OEAOLDCKAS
OTIATIONS FAIL

C. 0. Davis To Give
Lecture Tomorrow

CAMPUS ACTIVITY

F CE SEEKS TO
REARCH SETTLEMENT

Dean of Students Urges Need
tact Among Men of
University

of Con- ileply

to Great Britahi
} Coneiliatory
Tone

Assumes

ANT H BA CITF MINERSLAL) OPER-
ATORS FAIL TO tREAC1
DECISION
CLOSE OBSERVERS THINK
COAL STRIKE PROBABLE
Parley Reaches Agreement to Elm-
mate 12 Rowr Day; Wage Prob-
1Irn Not Discussed
Atlantic City, July 28-(By A.P.)-
Anthracite miners and operators, hav-
ing adjourned for the present their
agerconferences when they failed
yesterday to reach an understanding
on the check-off, are waiting for
something to turn up to permit them
to resume negotiations.
The present wage contract under
which the miners are working expires
in five weeks. The interruption of
the negotiations which came rather
unexpectedly to the public, was not
a surpirse to those following thene-
gotiations .Fo anthracite ;conference
in the past has ever reached a point
where substantial progress was made
toward an agreement five weeks in
advance of the expiration of a con-
tract.
Srtike Probable /
Instead of sitting day in and day
out discussing the demands as here-
tofore the two sides have decided fo
suspend discussion until either side is
inclined to resume the meetings. This
was indicated by the action of the op-
erators in asking that the secretary
be authorized to reconvene the meet-
Ing when necessary.
Close observers of the stuation be-
lieve there will be a suspension of
mining on Sept. 1 unless the govern-
ment presses both sides to agree. The
mines have been working full time
since they resumed operations after
last year's long suspension and the
transportation of coal has been going
forward a little above normal since
last spring in anticipation of a shut
down this fall.
Check-off is Obstacle
The discussion of the demands has
not gone'-far. At the outset the oper-
ators agreed to the demand of the
miners to eliminate as far as possible
the 12-hour day and that decisions
of the umpire in cases from the con-
ciliation board referred him should be
decided in 30 days.
The wage question discussed in on-
ly a general way at the opening meet-
ing, had not been touched since. The
break, if it can be called a break.
came on the question of the check-
off, which has been under discussion
at every wage conference in the an-
thracite fields since 1902.
iillerand Comniuts Sentence
, Dusseldorf, July 28.-(By A.P.) -
President Millerand, of France, has
commuted to life imprisonment the
death sentence passed b court-mart-
ial on Paul Georg, German engineer
for, the Badische Anilin company,
Ludwigschafen; he yas convicted at
Mayenne, June 13, of sabotage against
the Ruhr Occupation allies.
Air Service to India
London, July 28-(By A.P.)-The
press comments enthusiastically ov-
er the project of air service to bring
India within three days' travel of
England, Australia within seven days
and Canada and other parts of the'
empire within equally neighborly
traveling distance.
RUMOURS ARE-
"ROOMERS ARE!"

And that is more truth than
poetry, for right now i-ooms are
being reserved for the coming
semester. Avoid the rush and
rent your spare rooms now.,
Be satisfied with a satisfied ten-
ant.

Calvin 0. Davis
Professor Davis, of the School of
Education, will speak at 5 o'clock to-
morrow afternoon on. "The Develop-
ment and Significance of the Public
High iSchool," in the auditorium of
the Natural Science building.
DAVIS TO ISCUS HIGH
SCHOOLS IN TALK MONAY
Prof. C. 0 Davis, of the School of
Education. will speak on "The Devel-
opment and Significance of the Public
High School," Monday afternoon at 5
o'clock.
Professor Davis will, trace, the his-
torical development of the American
high school and will point out the fac-
tors which have contributed tq make
it the enormous institution it is today.
The present day attitude toward the
high schools will also be explained.
Professor Davis will point out the
functions of a modern school and what
it aims to accomplish.-
SUNDAY SERVICESr IN
AINN 9ARBOR CHURCHS.
Inr the First Presbyterian church,
Rev. W. B. Shirey will preach at the
10:30 o'clock services. The inter-
mediate and primary Sunday schools
will also meet at this time. At noon
the Bible class for young people will
be conducted and a social hour for the
Young Peoples' society will be held at
6 o'clock followed by the regular meet-
ing at 6:30 o'clock.
Community vesper service and mass
singing, under the direction of George
Oscar Bowen will be held on the plaza
in front of the general library. Rev.
C. T. Webb, Episcopal student pastor,
will speak on "Inspiration and Tech-
nique." Summer students and all oth-
er Ann, Arbor people are cordially in-
vited to attend.
After today's service no church will
be held In the Congregational church
until September. At 10:30 o'clock Mr.
Mitchell will have for his sermon,
"Jesus' Parable of the Warring Kings;
Heroes or Cowards."
Holy Communion will be given at 8
o'clock at St. Andrew's Episcopal
church. At 70:30 o'clock there will be
morning prayer and a sermon by Rev-
Charles T. Webb.
"TheMinistry' of Clouds" will be
the topic of Mr. Sayles' sermon at the
10:30 o'clock services at First Bapt-
ist church. The Guild Bible class for
students, conducted by Mr. George
Biggs, will meet in the church at 11:45
o'clock.
"Present Tendencies in Korea" will
be the subject of Prof. H. H. Under-
wood's talk at the First Methodisf
church at 10:30 o'clock. Student dis-
cussion group will meet at 12 o'clock
at Wesley hall, and at 6:30 o'clock the
Wesleyan guild devotional meeting
under the leadership of Mr. Wallace
Teed will be held.
At St. Paul's Lutheran ciurch there
will be Germanat 9:30 o'clock; Bible
school at 10:30 o'clock and English
sermon, "Christ Our Prophet," at 11:30
o'clock.
Bible school will be conducted at
9:30 o'clock at the Church of Christ
(Disciples) and there will be a serm-
on on "The Mind of Christ" at 10:30
o'clock, followed ky the Men's Service
club and Students' class at 12 o'clock.
Christian Endeavor, as usual at 6:30
lA'f / r

REPORT DECLARES 10 PER CENT
OF STUDENTS ARE "HERMITS"
In his annual report included in the
president's annual report which was
recently published, Dean Joseph A.
Bursley, dean of students, states that
considerable thought and attention is
being devoted to the problem of in-
teresting the "subnerged tenth" of
the student body-those students who
take no part in campus activities and
who confine their attention entirely
to their studies.
It is stated in the report that 10
per cent of the students do not bene-
fit by the opportuities offered for
exchange of ideas either by voluntary
contact with other students, .or by
participating in some activity.
Neglets Opporunities
"It must always be kept in the
student's mind," Dean Burseleys re-
port states, "that his primary reason
for coming to college is to study, but
at the same time he should not be
urged not to neglect this opportunity
for contact with men and with inter-
ests other than his own."
Would Require Activity
The report recommends that stu-
dents take part in activities during
their underclassmen career, due to
the pressure of time on student body
of the professional schools.
Dean Bursley has made a close
study of this problem for more than
two years and has discovered that the
problem almost. requires that the
"hermit" student be forced to mix
with his fellow students in order to
acquire the benefit of close associa-
tion.
MICHIGA9N MEN T FORT
MONROE RECIME PRASE
Word was received in the office of
the president yesterday from Lt. Col-
onel A. P. Maybach ,commander at
Fort Monroe, R. O..T. C. coast artil-
lery camp that Battery B which is
composed of students from the Uni-
yersity of Michigan, Kansas Agricul-
tural college, the Citadel and the Un-
iversity of Cincinnati won the highest
rating in small arms and close order
contests.
The. points upon which close order!
iV rated are drill, ceremony and
guard mount. Small arms has to do
with the percent of possible score in
the following; percent of those qual-
ifying as expert, percent of those
qualifying as sharpshooter and per-
cent of those qualifying as a marks-
man. The greatest credit is given for
those qualifying as experts.
In addition it is understood that
Battery B stands high in artillery,
soldierly qualities, and athletics.
Suitable trophies will be awarded at
the end of the training period.
I6UT TEAMS ENTERED
IN DOUBLES TOURNEY
Eight teams are entered in the Un-
iversity summer doubles tennis tourn-
ament, the first and second rounds of
which will be played this week. Sev-
eral strong teams are entered and it
is expected that there will be several
fast matches.
Players are requested to get in touch
with their opponents by telephone,
and play first round matches off be-
fore Wednesday afternoon. Drawings
follow:
Saline-Mayo 3478-J vs. Sun-Chung
2925-J.
Bulmer-Koch 2487-J vs. Merriam-

Dunnikan 131.,
Davis-Zook ,913-W vs. Wickett-Fox
1430-3
Dreyfuss-Schwartz 751-W vs. Reed
Galbraith 2809-R.
Blanton Exhonerated
Comanche, Tex., July 28.-Congress-
man Thomas L. Blanton was exoner-
ated of a charge of libel of former
Congressman Oscar Gallaway when a
jury in county cour returned a ver-
dict of not guilty, yesterday.

OFFICIALS LOOK FOR NEW
ALLIANCE WITH ENGLAND
Paris, July 28-(By A.P.)-The
French note to Great Britain in re-
ply to the British suggestions as to
a joint-response to Germany's repar-
ation memorandum was said author-
itatively today to have been drafted
with the determination to exhaust ev-
ery means of reaching a full acord
with the British.
Delivery of the Frenh note is
awaiting only word )from Brussels
that the Belgian note to London also
is ready. The Frenh communiation
in any case will be deliveerd by the
beginning of next week, whether the
Belgian note is ready or not, because
Primier Poincare is anxious to com-
ply with the desire of Lord Curzon,
the British secretary of foreign af-
fairs, to receive France's answer be-
fore the British parliament adjourns
for the summer recess.
The chances of rewelding the en-
tente, with Great Britain co-operating
in the effort to obtain guaranties for
the payment of reparation by Ger-
many, is believed by those closely in
touch with reperations question to
be better than at any time since the
split of last January.
The rebirth of the allied supreme
council is predicted now as a likely
consequence of the exchange of
notes.;
COCH SAS NEW IELD
HOUSE NEEDED FOR FALL
YOST ANXIOUS TO GET VARSITY
ATHLETES AWAY FROM
GYMNASIUM
Yost Field house is urgently' re-
quired for use in the fall, according to
a statement by Coach Fielding H.
Yost, director pf intercollegiate ath-
letics, firstly because the gymnasium
will be full to overflowing with in-
tramural athletics, with the physical
education program, and with the
physical work required of undergrad-
uates; secondly, because for five
rponths of the year beginning the first
fortnight in November bad weather
necessitates carrying on indoors the
work in the intercollegiate program
and in the physical development of
candidates for intercollegiate athlet-
ics. In addition to the University
teams in training there are usually
1,000 freshmen candidates to be train-
ed for the teams, in anticipation of the
timbe when they become eligible.
The program of training to be car-
ried out incluudes track work, bask-
etball, baseball, wrestling, boxing,
handball, and the general development
of athletes. Men taking the four
years' physical education course will
have most of their games at Ferry field
Space has been alloted for the use of
men engaged in intramural work, as
during the spring and fall outdoor
work is carried on at Ferry field.
Provision has also been .made for
Athletic association offices, and there
are facilities for the storage, repairing
and washing of equipment.
There are 75 men working on the
building, of whom 35 are masons. To
complete the work by the contracted
time, Oct. 1, 15 more masons are re-
quired-,
Cardinal Marini Dead
London, July 28-(By A.P.)-A
Central News dispatch from Rome
says Cardinal Nicolo Marini, who par-
ticipated in the election of Pope Pius
despite a severe attack of influenza,
is dead.

Davis Visits Ruhr
Paris, July 28,-(By A.P.)-James
J. Davis, American secretary of labor,
spent several hours studying the Ruhr
yesterday, visiting Dusseldorf and Es-
sen.
Eight Killed in Sopia
Paris, July 28.-(By A.P.)-A Havas
dispatch from Sopia. says eight were
skilled and 20 hurt in the wreck of the
Varna express train (earlier .reports
had it that hundreds were killed.)

Joy Marks Passing
Of Tar Sidewalks
IThe tearing up of the last of the
tar sidewalks and their replacement
by concrete walks is an incident which
will be received with joy by many who
have walked, skidded ' and stumbled
along them for many years. 'these
walks, resembling washed out foot-'
paths in some places have literally'
grown up 'with the trees to some ex-
tent and in their many years of serv-
ice have caused much cursing as stu-
dents and townspeople have tripped,
shuffled,. or staggered along them on
dark nights, or jumped over the pud-
dles they form after a rain. Many a
toe has been stubbed and many an
ankle has been splashed as their mole-
hill-like surfaces have been trod by
thousands of feetsince their growth
upward with the roots of nearby trees.
OPTICA WORK ON
LENS UNDER WAY
I8 Inch Crystal For Refactor Being
Ground By The Brashear
Company
$40,00 TELESCOPE IS GIFT
OFROBT. P. LAMONT, 991E
Optical work on the 18-inch rough
glass disk for the large refracting
telescope at the Olbesrvatory is under
way at the John A. Brashear com-
pany in Pittsburg. The lens, which
the University Observatory has been
awaiting for for the past 10 years,
was cast in Jena, Germany, by Shott
& Sons..
In 1911 efforts were made to secure
the necessary glass for the telescope
but European glass works failed in
their attempts to manufacture the es-
sential disk. The war prevented furth-
er attempts in its manufacture and it
was not until February last that the
crystal was received in this country.
The grinding and polishing of the
lens Is now under way at the Pitts-
burg firm where considerable work.
must be done and time expended in
the perfecting of the glass. The other
parts of the big telescope, ultimately
to, represent an expenditure of ap-
proximately $40;000, have been con-
structed at the University Observatory
shops and now await the securing of
the lens.
Robert P. Lamont, '91E, donated the
telescope under construction and Prof.
W. J. Hussey, of the department of
astronomy, designed the 'instrument.
There are now in exjstence only sev-
,en telescopes with lenses larger than
the one now in construction.
As soon as the lens is received in
Ann Arbor the instrument is to be as-
sembled and tried out at the Univer-
sity Observatory shops. Upon com-
pletion the telescope is to be taken
to the southern hemisphere, South
Anerica or Australia, where Professor
Hussey will complete his survey of
the southern heavens and his observa-
tions on the measurement of the
double stars.
PRESS CLUB WlL HOLD
CONTENTION SEPTEMBERS9
The University Press Club of Mich-
igan will hold its fifth annual con-
vention, under the auspices of the De-

partment of Journalism, on Thursday,
Friday, and Saturday, Sept. 9, 10 and
11. The purpose of the organization
Is to develop higher professional
standards among newspaper men gen-
erally, to create better spirit of mu-
tual understanding among journalists,
and to secure the friendly co-operation"
of teachers and editors in the training
'of newspaper workers at the Univer-
:sity.
Approximately 200 editors and pub-
lishers are expected to attend., There
are to be morning and afternoon ses-
sions throughout the three days, in-
cluding a luncheon on Thursday and
a banquet on Friday night. The ban-
quet is usally addressed by President
Marion L" Burton.
Shopper Loses $150

CN 1 EDIT HOLDS
FRANCEIBLE FOR
ECONOMICTROUBLE'l,
(40VERNMENT ASKS FOR UNIT'Y
OBSERVANCE OF LAW AMONG
PEOPLE
EDICT SAYS SEIZURE
OF RUHR CAUSES CRASH
Paper Drafted in Cabinet; Ebert
Present; Urges Germans to
Sacrifice
Berlin, June 28-(By A.P.)-In a
fervent appeal to the German people,
the .Cuno :government' pleads for
unity, maintenance of law and or-
der, fdrbearance with the prevailing
economic difficulties and 'for niation-
wide emtulation of the spirit of pat-
riotic sacrifice and devotion mani-
fested by the population of the Ruhr
and Rhineland in the face ok over-
whelming pesecution and privation.
/The proclamation drafted at a full
session of the- Cabinet today, at which
President Ebert also was present, .set
forth the genesis of the economic
clash .which is now reflecting acute-
ly in the worthlesness of the nations
currency, deranged business condi-
tions, and disorganization of the food
supply, all of which says the state-
ment, "is directly traceable to the
French action in the Ruhr nation,
which proved a mortal blow to the
nation's economic and financial or-
ganization, and which 'is primarily
responsible for the monstrous drop
in the value of the country's cur-
rency." -~
To this dafy, the statement contin-
ues, France's willful interference
with every effort to achieve a solu-
tion of the reparation poblem which*
would concede to Germany a chance
to live has resulted. Until such time
as the reparation is definitely ad-
justed, the German people must, ,and
will sustain themselves by virtue of
their own powers and resources-
WOMEN'S EDUCATIONAL
CLUB TO_ HOLD PICNICy
Plans for the annual Women's Ed-
ucational club picnic to be held at
the Island Monday evening, at which
50 members and their friends are ex-
pected to be present, have been com-
pleted and tickets may be obtained
at Tappan hall.
Invitations have been sent to mem-
bers of the faculty, several of whom
have already accepted. The group
will meet at Barbour gymnasium at
4:30 o'clock Monday afternoon before
leaving for the Island.
AT THE THEATERS
MAJESTIC
"Chldreaa of Dust," featuring Johny
Walker and Pauline Garon, will be
the current attraction at the Majestic
theater Sunday through Wednesday.
Under the direction of Frank Borz-
age, director of "Humoresque," this
picture has been made famous by its
human interest appeal.
The story is of a youth, Terwilliger,

who adopts Old Archer, caretaker of
an estate, as his father. The boy
secretly loves the daughter of the
wealthy owners of the estate. Ter-
williger shoulders the blame for a
supposed theft in order that'his rival
'may not be suspected and in the work-
(Continued on Page Four)
'Pavison Icholars Announced
Cambridge, July 28.-(By A.P.) -
The winners of the: H. P. Davison
scholarships for 1923-24 have been an-
nounced, by the university committee.
They are W. D. Macpherson (Har-
row & Trinity), Scholar of Trinity,
and captain of the Real tennis team,
who will go to Harvard; E. C. Moule
(Weymouth and Emmanuel college),
scholar of Emmanuel, and a Iugby

rIdA VV

Flint, Mich., July 28.-(By A.P.)-D. Ifootball player,
Frisch, 201 South Saginaw street, told and H. St. D.
police that he had his pocket picked King's college,
of $150 while shopping in downtown lightweight box
stores, who will go to

who will go to
Netleton (Eton
scholar of E
er normn nd

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