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July 28, 1923 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-07-28

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V iA 1 £I lr-.
JED SHOWERS
TODAY

It,

W4

:43 a tl

ASSOCI
PRE

DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

a

No. 30

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JULY 28, 1923

PRICE FIVE C

~1

_..----

o COLt STHiKE
I MS-OPERATORS
B FAILS AS OPERATORS
EFUSE DEMANDS FOR
CLOSED SHOP

T ON SEPT. I
RS' ULTIMATUM
it to Overnight Truce
>r Owners, to Make
New Terms

Expected Themes
From Olden Days
Not In West Hall
Now that West hall, "the building
that shakes", is being reduced to dust,
o;ne might well expect much to come
out of the musty cellar in the way of
theme papers hating from the time
the building was first used by the
University for classes 23 years ago,
but sadly enough nothing of interest
has been dug from the cellar where
the dust lies inches thick except a
few magazines of ancient date and
papers for seven years back.
The reason for this, according to
Professor Rankin, who has had charge
of moving the books and files, is that
every six or seven years the theme
papers, which have been kept in or-
der up to this time are baled and sold
by the Uiiiversity, to paper compan-
ies. Who knows but that we are now
writing themes on the same paper
that our predecessors in West hall did
20 years ago.
TRAVIS BAL, SON
OF REGET, DEA

tlantic City, N. J., July 27. - The
ke cloud which has hovered over
iracite wage conferences at the
el Ambassador since July 6 ap-
'ed sooty black today following
operators' refusal last night to
it the miners' demand for a closed
a ultimatum presented to the hard
mine operators by the miners'
in declared that unless their. de-
ds -for a closed shop, "complete
gnition of their union" by the op-
ors and the check-off throughout
anthracite industry, a strike would
alled Sept. 1, the day after the pre-
wage contract expires.
Both Sides Stubborn
ither side could see any rift in the
d, each declaring it was steadfast
he attitude which led to the break
.he conference. Both declined to
rnent on the possibility of federal
rvention. The miners already
announced they do not propose
rbitrate.
e present crisis was reported
n John L. Lewis, president of the
ed Mine Workers of America em-
ed the check-off and "complete
gnition of the union" interpreted
hie closed shop in a resolution on
: the joint committee voted 4 to
W. Lewis announced that, inas-
h as the operators were "arbitrar-
ejecting the proposition the con-
ices might as well adjourn."
Miners -Insistent
Fe attitude of the miners, express-
y Mr. Lewis- today, was:
re are insistent on this point and.
,continue to be," and S. D. War-
, the operator's" spokesman, re-
1, 'when asked if their stand was
"we presume it is."
wch side used as a main argument
of the recommendations contain-
1 the recently submitted report of
United States coal commission.
miners interpreted as approval of
heck-off the recommendation for
ctions from the pay roll of pen-
s on union men for breach of con-
"All Men May Work"
e operators quoted another sec-
of the report which set forth the
. of a man "to work free and un-
peded--when, where and for
hsoever he chooses, to employ and
large as he pleases."
e conference was further embit-
i by resentment created among
niner delegates by published re-;
that the operators had charact-
d the check-off and closed shop
an-American demands." The un-
nen told the employer delegates.
0lSQUA E IARS
ASPHALT BEIN LID0,
proximately 19,000 square yards
phalt pavement is being put down
ie city of Ann Arbor, according
statement made by assistant en-
er, . R. Scovill.
nstfuction Uias been completed
outh 'State street from Arch to
ger avenue and on Fourth avenue
Liberty to Packard street. The
ch on Geddes avenue between
itenaw avenue and Oxford road
be completed by the fourth of
Lst.
'o and a half miles of curb and
r are being built throughout the
S. Crew Escapes From Sibera
me, Alaska. July 27.-The crew
e trading schooner Iskum, of Ta-
6, which was held in Siberia by

FRENCH, REPLY TO
ENGLAND Is READY
Accepts Some of British Suggestions
And Asks For Further In-
formation
MAINTAINS PRINCIPLE OF
FRANCO-BELGIAN DELARATION
Paris, July 27.-The French reply
to the British reparation note will be
delivered in London tomorrow or Sun-
day. It accepts some of the British
suggestions and asks for further light
on others., It maintains the principle
of the Franco-Belgian declaration to
the effect that passive resistance must
cease before negotiations with Ger-
many are undertaken.
Dusselidorf, July 27.-James J.
Davis, American secretary of labor, ar-
rived here today for a brief visit to
the Rhur. He will return to Paris to-
night. This afternoon, Secretary Dav-
is visited Essen, accampanied by of-
ficers of the French staff.
Dusseldorf, July 27-(By A.P.)-The
frontier between the Ruhr and the
rest of Germany, after having been
closed to ordinary travelers since"
July 1, has been opened, and thous-
ands of Germans are crossing back
and forth. Many of them had been
kept away from their homes when the
closure order was put on by the Oc-
cupation Allies.
Closed as Penaty
The frontier first was closed by the1
French as a penalty for the bombingY
of a train'at Dusburg, applied only to
private travelers, and was to havef
continued until July 16. Just beforet
the expiration of this period, an in-
cident occurred near Westofen, a num-
ber of French patrol being kidnappedF
by Germany Security Police, aided by
other Germans, who were suspected
of attempting to evade the FrenchI
customs officers. The Rhineland
High Commission, as a penalty, ex-
tended closure until July 26.1
The unusual number of crossingsE
is attributed to rumors current in the
last few days that, the Occupation Al-
lies 'contemplated' again closing the
frontier, but thus far there are no
indications that such a measure is be-
ing considered.

IS FALSE-KUSSEY

Geology
ments

Professor Declares State-
About Antedeluvian Mon-
ster Unfounded

Attack of
troit

Appendicitis Fatal to De-
Realtor, Graduate of
University

DUSAR UMOR

College Professor.
Serves 30 Years

ADVANCES THEORY OF HUGE
LAND ADVERTISING HOAX
Rumors of the appearance of the
huge prehistoric antedeluvian mon-
ster seen in Nebraska by natives must
be false, according to Prof. R. C. Hus-
sey of the Geology department. He
went on to say that this talk of its
being a dinousaur or some antedeluv-
ian monster is .absurd, as they all be-
came extinct at least 20 million years
ago.
He said, "the only theory I can ad-
vance is that someone is trying to
put over a huge advertising trick of
some kind, either to attract tourists
or to sell land. About once or twice
a year, in some part of the country
there arises a rumor of prehistoric
beasts, wild animals, or some outland-
ish creatures being seen by the na-
tives, an4 the strange thing about it all
is that no one ever hears any more
about these stories after a few days,
which proves them to be merely fak-
ed to attract the attention of the
country to that locality.
The scheme is far fetched, but nev-'
ertheless has been given a great deal
of publicity !it many papers, which is
just what the natives of Big Alkalat
lake want.
Prof Hussey went on to say that
he knew of some scientists in South
America who had been refused money
from their headquarters to carry on
their work, so they concocted a wild
story about prehistoric animals seen
in the jungles, and attracted so much
attention in this way that they were
granted their money to use in carry-
ing on further research for these mon-
sters, whereupon, their object accom-
plshed, they used it for their own
purposes and the monsters were nev-
er heard of again.
BERLIN -BANKS' SUPPLY
OFCRRNYEXHAUSTED

liiiiiiiIia

SERVED IN NAVY DURING
WAR, APPOINTED ENSIGN
Travis Beal, '18, son of Regent Jun-
ius E. Beal and Mrs. Beal, of this city,
died yesterday afternoon at his home
following an illness of several months
resulting from an attack of appendi-
citis.
After his graduation from the Uni-
versity, he enlisted in the United
States navy, serving as an ensign
during the war. He was later en-
gaged in real estate business in De-
troit, returning to Ann Arbor shortly
before he became ill.
He was a member of Beta Theta Pi
fraternity.
SUIT 1 ILED'sD KLAN
MAY BUY YALPARISO -U.
TRUSTEES DECLARE TITLE HELD
BY COOK COMPANY OF CHI-
CAGO IS INVALID
Valpariso, Ind., July 27-Suit was
filed in Circuit Court here yesterday
by Valparaiso university to clear the
title to the school property, which
was eased to the Cook Laboratories
Co. by the owners after trustees of
the institution were reporte. to have
pened negotiations with theKu Klux
Klan to take over the school.
Trustees of the university, who
claim the lease granted the Cook com-
pany is invalid, ask that ,a decree be
entered by the court fixing and es-
tablishing the plantiff's title to the
plaintiff's declare the Cook company,
a Chicago concern, is a foreign cor-
poration and has never made any ef-
fort to comply with the laws of the
State.
Lease Revoked
The lease held by the school to the
property was revoked recently when
the school rental payments fell be-
hind . The payments were made a
few days later, however, and the
plaintiffs allege action. of the reality
company in revoking the lease, is il-
legal.
Henry K. Brown, former president
of the university, and its principal
creditor, is reported to have taken ac-
tion to turn the property over to the
Chicago concern after the trustees
opened negotiations with the Klan or-
ganization to take over the ns titu-
tion.
Evans Wants Klan
Dr. H. M. Evans, president of the
university, in a statement, declared
it was decided to offer the school to
the Klan In order to -save it from
a financial collapse.
Officials of the Klan said today ne-
gotiations still are in progress and
that the organization is willing' to
take it over if the trustees can pre-
sent a sound financial proposition.
Valparaiso, Ind., July 27.-(By A.
P.)-The sum paid the Valparasio
Rssn.. ---mi air ' Mh (nt anra".'

PLAY PRODUCTION CLASS
WILL PRESENT PROGRAM
On Aug. 9 and 10, the play produc-
tion class will stage a group of one-
act plays in the auditorium of Univer-
sity hall. "The Importance of Being'
Ernest" by Oscar Wilde, will be given
on Aug. 10. Alexander Dean, who is
connected with the Little Theater of
Dallas, Tex.,° will give assistance in
the staging of the plays.
The cast for "The Importance of
Being Ernest" is especially experi-
enced. All of the members of the cast,
except one, are graduate students,
and three members played last sum-
mer in "The Rivals."
General admission will be charged.

.
i
t
.
t
;.
'
4
t

BEI HUMANlZIN[
CHICAGO HIGH SCHOOL PRIN
PAL STRESSES PERSONAL
SIDE OF LEARNING
BROADENING OF VISION
MUST BE PROVIDED F(
Expanding of Personality, Drepen
.of Understandink are Other
Essentials

DEMPSEY AND FIRPO WILL
MEET ON SEPTEMBER

121

New York, Jily 27-(By A.P.)-Just
two months after he battered the huge
Jess Willard to the floor in Jersey
City, Luis Firpo, the South American
heavyweight, will have anhopportun-
ity of wresting the heavyweight
championship from Jack Dempsey,,
Tex Rickard announced Thursday af-
ternoon.
The promoter said it had been fin-.
ally and definitely decided to hold the
contest on Sept. 12, but the exact
place of holding the bout had not yet
been settled.
It may be held at the Polo grounds,
in which case it would be a 15-round
decision affair. If it is found impos-
sible to agree on the Giant's ball park
as a site, the bout undoubtedly will be
taken to Jersey City to be contested
at Boyle's Thirty Acres. Firpo would
have to score a knockout to win the
championship in Jersey City as no de-
cisions are allowed.
Cardinal Marini Dead
Rome, July 27-Cardinal Niccolo
Marini, an Italian, .died today, aged
80. He was created a cardinal in 1916.

Berlin, July 27.-(By A.P.)-Berlinf
was a city of penniless millionaires]
tonight. Bank deposits and foreign
obills of exchange were useless as the
banks had only small amounts of cur-
rency which Were paid out today in
small bills and rationed until the sup-
ply was exhausted. Many tourists
were unable to get money enough to
continue their journeys. The banks
promised to have currency tomorrow
but no large bills are yet available in
Berlin and foreign moneys are entire-
ly out of circulation.
The food shops in various parts of
the city had exhausted their supplies
of sugar, flour, rice and other staples
and the police have been ordered to
give special protection to food trans-
Berlin, July' 27-(By A.P.)-Ger-
many urgently needs a new currency
system, in the almost unanimous opin-
ion of the Berlin financial writers.
The bourse and financial circles pro-
fess to see a cataclysmic collapse of
the nation's currency already at hand
or as a near eventuality.
With the withdrawal of the govern-
ment's restrictiveregulations, the last
48 hours have witnessed a hectic rise
in the dollar and pound sterling, with
an accompanying advance of prices in
all branches of trade and commerce,
the upward movement assuming such
momentum that the government is
apparrently at loss for new correct-
ive measures.
Some optimistic writers believe the
prospective internal gold loan will
point the way out of the present
dilemma.
Cody to Talk at Normal
Kalamazoo, Mich., July 27-(By A.
P.)-Frank JCody, superintendent of
Detroit public schools, wil deliver the
principal address at the second an-
nual summer commencemenqt exer-
cises of Western State Normal School
next Tuesday. Two hundred fifty stu-
dents will be given diplomas and a
number will receive A. B. degrees.

Dr. Joseph Iarker ,
Dr. Joseph Harker, head of the Illi-
nois Methodist Woman's college at
Jacksonville, Ill., has just completed
30 years servicefin that capacity. He
is the oldest. Methodist professor in
the United States.
100 MAKE TIRTO
PUT-IN-BAYTODAY
Leave at 6 This Morning on Special
Interurban Car-Take Boat
at 9 O'clock
WILL VISIT CRYSTAL CAVE
AND PERRY VICTORY MONUMENT
About 100 Put-in-Bay excursionists
left the city this morning at 6 o'clock
on a special interurban car for Detroit
At 9 o'clock the steamer is scheduled
to leave the First street dock for Put-
in-Bay, where it is due to arrive at
noon.
Arriving at their destination, the.ex-
cursionists will visit Perry's victory
memorial monument, which is 30 feet
high and is equipped with a splendid
ob ervatory room from which a view'
(of the entire vicinity is visible on a
clear day.
Prof. J. P. Rowe, of the University
of Montana, who is in charge of the
excursion, has made arrangements
for the party to visit Crystal and Mam-
moth caves. In going through the
caves Professor Rowe will point out
the geological significance of the cry-
stals of celestite, the jointing in rocks
and rock strata, and the stalactites
and stalagmite contained in each. Per-
ry and Paradise caves will also be
visited; the former being the largest
cave on the island-
The party leaves Put-in-Bay at 4:30
o'clock this afternoon, arriving in De-
troit about 8 o'clock this evening.
Special cars to Ann Arbor will leave
the Detroit interurban station at 8:40
o'clock.
OIL 'MEN_-APPROTE IPLAN,
TO REDUCE GAIS SURPLUS
Chicago, Julby 28-(By A.P.)-Ac-
tion to close every refinery in the mid-
continent field for the -month of Au-
gust as a step toward the reduction
of the present surplus of gasoline
and crude oil was approved today by
a group of leading oil men of the
southwest representing the Western
Petroleum Refiners association and
the American Oilmen's association, of-
ficers of the latter organization an-
nounced.
More than a score of' the largest
refineries are understood to have
agreed to the suggestion. The action
came unexpectedly as a "side show"
to the meeting of more than 500 mid-
continent oil men here to discuss the
problems of the industry. The deci-
sion to close the refineries in the
greatest producing area in the coun-
try is the most sweeping action yet
taken by the industry to stabilize the
trade which the oilmen declare was
unbalanced this spring by the back-
ward season and overwhelming sup-
ply of crude oil from all quarters.

In a lecture "Some Problems in
Secondary School Administration,"
yesterday afternoon, B. F. Buck, Prin-
cipal of the Nicholas Senn High
school, Chicago, said that special at-
tention should be paid to the process
of acquiring knowledge, cultivating
an attitude of mind, and developing
a sense of responsibility,
"Only until recently . has the sub-
ject matter of instruction been con-
sidered other than knowledge of past
ages to be stored up in memory and
left for chance to develop into vital
and living relationship with every day
life," said the speaker, "and. yet of
still later origin is the consciousness
of the value of extra curricular activ-
ities in our educationa program. And
now the head of an institution res-
ponsible for the welfare of a large
group of the rising generation must
see the end from the beginning and
and try to organize so the aims and
Wpins of the institution !that they
may become realized in actual partic-
ipation in life experiences. This is a
long step forward and very difficult
of accomplishment in our present
highly specialized social system."
Humanized Education
The speaker then emphasized the
important fact that an education
should be a humanizing process as
well as a practicalizing one.
"That it must provide for a broaden-
ing of the vision, a deepening of the
,general understanding, a realizing of
potential powers, expanding ofper-
sonality, a developing of native inter-
ests ,en husiasms and ideals, must be.
ever present in mind of the high
school principal. His problem, then,
and principaly, in so far as the cur-
ricuum and its administration is con-
cerned is to use material at hand and
in such a fashion as will foster this
humanizing process, and at the same
time provide, in so far as possible,
for an adequate training in technical
acquracy, dependableness, inidustry,
persistence, right habits, practical
knowledge, adherence to duty, and
other qualities demanded for patic-
ipating successfully in the experiences
of life."
Don'ts For Principals
In referring to the work of the su-
pervisors, he listed a . number of
"do's"-and "dont's" to be rigidly ob-
served, including the attitude of the
spy who acts on suspicion, and the
"humming bird" variety of principal,
who flits from room to room in his
daily calls with his "good morning"'
or "goodby" leaving nothing except
an interruption of what might other-
wise be a successful class exercise
and carrying away nothing "except
possibly a mere impression that work
is going well or ill, that teacher's
voice is rough or toneless, or that
some child is due for discipline be-
cause of undue noise or untidy dress",
the pessimst, the scold, the buly, and'
the machine made principal "of ma-
chine like tendencies who thinks that
all classes should move along in lock-
step fashion in conformity with the
letter of the law with too little atten-
tion to the observance of its spirit."
After speaking on -the attitude of the
mind of the student, Mr. Buck then
discussed the development of. consci-
ousness of young people regarding so-
cial responsibilities, and in conclusion
stated that the greatest compensation
of any teacher was the uplift they
have given to the,* pupils under his
care.
Gouveneur Morris 'o Marry
San Francisco, uy 27-(By A.P.)--
The engagement of Guieur Mor-
ris, author, and hi's se ',Miss
Helen Wiehtmann. - °&a nnounced

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