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July 25, 1923 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-07-25

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WEATHER

MODERATE TEMPER-
ATURE TODAY

Sic ian

4,7:D il

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WI
SERVICE

XIV. No. 28.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JULY 25, 1923

PRICE FIY

P HI DELTA KAPPA
PICGKS CANDIDATES;
FRRiSTOSPEAK
SEVEN STATE SCHOOL HEADS AND
SUPERINTENDENTS LISTED
AS CANDIDATES
HONORARY FRATERNITY
HOLDS RITES THURSDAY
State Senator and Head of Big Rapids
Institute Is Principal
Speakev
Officers of Phi Delta Kappa have
completed plans for their annual in-
itiation scheduled for 3 o'clock to-
morrow afternoon in 'the assembly
room of the Union. The list of can-
didates for initiation, elected by the
members of the fraternity was an-
nounced last night, follows;
Superintendent, A. A. Rather of Ion-
ia; Sup. G. A. Smith of Plymouth,
Supt. F. W. Fast of Mt. Clemens,
Supt. I. E. King of Coldwater, C. D.
Kingsley, former high school inspec-
tor for Massachusetts, F. A. Jensen
former superintendent of Benton Har-
bor, I-. L. Briggs, head of the depart-
ment of vocational education in Clev-
eland.
Th initiation will be followed by a
banget at 6 o'clock at which Sena-
tor Woodridge N. Ferris will be the
guest of honor.
Phi Delta. Kappa, the only honorary
educational fraternity, has been grow-
ing rapidly since-its organization in
1910 at Indianapolis, when the rep-
resentatives of three prior independ-,
ent organizations met and effected a
consolidation under the name of Phi
Delta Kappa. A national council,
comprised of delegates from several
chapters, plus an executive commit-
tee of five members conducts the gov-
ernment of the society. This executive
committee takes cae of affairs be-
tween council meetings, which are
hfeld biennially.
Senator Ferris will address the Phi
Delta Kappa fraternity, and the pub-
lie at 8 o'clock tomorrow evening.
Because of the demand for tickets, 50
extra seats have been placed in the
assembly room. Tickets may be ob-
tained free at Wahr's book store.
.OMPTO WILL U USS
In his lecture on "What Heats the
Sun," Thursday afternoon, Prof.,K. T.
Compton, of Princeton university, will
give a survey of the known sources
of heat in the sun.
He will give an estimate of the
amount of heat which must have been
lost by the sun in the past, and the
age of the solar system will be used
as a means of determining the amount
of this lost heat. On the basis of
these estimates, the source of known
heat in the sun it is believed, is not
idequate to supply all the heat which
the sun has lost. Professor Compton
will discuss the two additional
sources of heat energy.
ROMER HEATH LEVES
yFORNEWTYORK SURVEY

Homer Heath, general manager of.
the $nion, left yesterday for New
York where he will spend a week
making a survey of the clubs of that
city at' the request of the University
of Michigan Alumni'of New York. The
survey is being made for the purpose
of forming plans for a clubhouse for
the New York graduates.,

RADICAL CONSTELLATION BRIGHTENS;
OLD PARTIES FACE FIGHT FOR LIFE

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Senators Shipstead and Johnson, Minnesota, and Senator Frazier, North Dakota. elow:
Senators Brookhart, Iowa: La Folile te WI con- in, and Ladd, North Dakota

Above, left to right:

Posters Exhibited
At Memorial Hall
'he exhibition of educational panels
and publications of the National Child
Welfare association which is being
held this week in Alumni Memorial
hall under the direction of Miss E. H.
Ragan, is creating comment among
observers.
These educational panels, or post-
ers, are used in teaching citizenship,
thrift, *holesome standards of health
and morals, and a high personal ideal-
ism.
The posters have been purchased
and sent to almost every country in
the world, and it was only recently
that a surgeon-general purchased
3,600 to be placed in naval training
schools. Following the exhibition here
the posters will be taken to Chicago
and Cornell universities.
SCOTT DISCUSSE5
MAR4K TWAI'S WIT
Relates Early History of American
Humorist's Life in "Wild
West"
WORKS CONTAIN ESSENTIAL
SPONTANIETY, SPEAKER STATES'
By Dorothy Mitts
In an address before a crowd that
filled the auditorium of .the Natural
Science building, yesterday afternoon,
Professor Harold P. Scott, of the rhet-
oric department, and associate edi-
tor of the Michigan Alumnus, enter-
tained his audience with a paper on
"Mark Twain and His Humor".
Began Work as Journalist
Mark Twain, Professor Scott stat-
ed, first tried his powers in a west-
ern newspaper office. "It was a fine
school, too, for a man of wit withf
a humorous- satiric bent. The rough
mining camp readers were keenly
alive to the sort of slap-stick comedy
that was current in their newspapers,
especially since a great deal of it was
personal, directed at individuals with-
in the community. They loved a good
joke on the other fellow. That was
fine for the writer. But when the
joke came home to roost, their idea
of repartee was to reply by pistol.
That was not so fine for the writer.
Writing under such conditions, Mark
Twain learned to be cautious in that
he learned moderation right where
there was leagst moderation. He
came away with a thorough realiza-
tion- of the force of satire, with a
firm belief that the satirist should be
sure of )his facts before writing, with
a hatred of practical joking strong
enough to last throughout his life, but
with the courage to strike out with-
out hesitation or regard for persona
Iconsequences whenever he found a
cause that needed a champion."
In comparing Mark Twain's writ-
ings of the early days with the hum-
orous writings of today, he said, "The
sense for the comic was then, and
is now, a sense for the unfitness of
things. As time passes, life, people
and situations change, new and dif-
ferent things becoming fitting and the
opposite, but the nature of the comic
sense never changes. It always de-
pends upon a man's knowledge and
his judgment. The broader his know-
ledge and the keener his judgment,
the more comicalities he will discov-
er, in a world that is really very
funny; and whenever he discovers a
fresh incongruity, he will think it
especially laughable."

The speaker then stressed the great
discoveries Mark Twain made in char-
acterization: the value of the naive,
innocent, unsophisticated personage
to the comic writer.
Nalviety Source ,of Wit
"Why does he use so many charac-
(Continued on Page Three)

LAUSANNE TREATY
OTTOMAN EIMPII
CONSTANTINOPLE MAKES 11
DAY AS POiE.RS SIG N
DOCUMENT
TURKS REGAINS THR A(
JOINS LEAGUE NATTIO
Constantinople Goes Definitely
Turks but Armenian IProblemt
Not Solved
Constantinople, July 24.- (E
A.P.)-Today was observed as
'public holiday in honor of thl
signing of the peace treaty a
Lausanne. The streets. were gail
decorated -ith flags and the shop
were closed. Asalute of 101 gun
was fired on the announcemei
of the signing of the treaty an
ships in' the harbor blew the:
whistles for half an hour.
Lavsa'nne, July 24.-By the tre
of Lausanne, which was signed tod
Turkey regains eastern Tharce
becomes the bridge between the e
and the west. She joins the Lea
of Nations on' the footing'of equal
Constantinople goes definitely
Turkey.
All foreign troops will .be w
drawn.
The treaty {Hakes peace betw
Greece and Turkey.
It permits the patriarch of
Greek orthodox church to remain
Constantinople.
It launches one of the most :
pendous and in some ways the n
cruel human movements by its c
pulsory excange of populations,
Greeks in Turkey returning to Gre
and the Turks'in Greece returning
Turkey.
It reduces Tnrkey's size by its
ogition of detached mandated st
like Syria, Mespotamia and Palest
With .one stroke of the pen, it
Turkey of judicial capitulations s
as Ohina vainly sought to acc
plish for itself at Washington
which Japan achieved only after
decades of struggle.

DRIVE FOR CAMP,
FUD PENS TODAY
Directors Expect Necessary Funds
Will be Subscribed in Sale of
,Tags
400 BOYS GIVEN OUTING; $400
NEEDED TO COMPLETE SECTION
-I.
Students in the-,Summer session will}
be given an opportunity today to helpj
in the maintenance of the University
Fresh Air camp which this year is to
give 500 poor children fromnearby
towns a ten days'- outing. With the
camp lacking in funds the tag day to
be held on the campus today is ex-
pected to net close to $400 for the
work.
"The fourth section of the camp i.
in serious danger' of being called off
because of finances," declared Lewis[
C. Reimann, '16, former Varsity foot-
ball man, and director of the camp,
yesterday. "Thus far we lave given
almost 400 kiddies an outing which
they will not forget, and about 120
more have been promised their good
time at the fourth section of the camp
which will begin within a few days.I
That this section should have to be
called off would be one of the worst
things that could happen for the
camp."
The tag day today, it has been de-
clared, is the deciding factor in the
maintenance of the camp for the
fourth section. Previous contributions
have been more than eough to care

La Follette Group!
Menaces Old Guard
Brighter than ever shines forth
the radical constellation which re-
volves around Sen. Robert M. La Fol-
lette in the United States senate.
The overwhelming victory of Mag-
nus Johnson, Farmer.I abor: senate
candidate and disciple of La Follette,
over ,Gov. J. A. O. Preus, "old guard"
Republican candidate, in Minnesota,
practically assures control of the next
senate for La Follette through the bal-
ance of power which he controls.
Also, it gives the leaders of both
old parties considerable to think about.'
Even the most straight-laced Dem-
corats and Republican leaders realize
that the defeat of the regular G. O. P.
candidate and the sorry showing of'
the Democratic standard bearer will
add impetus to the already powerful
movement for a realignment of part-
ies.
Chairman John T.. Adams of the Re-
publican national committee sees in
the result the destruction of the Dem-
ocratic party in Minnesota and the
nearby states. That's his ray of sun-
shine.
Democratic Chairman Cordell Hull
is optimisttic, declaring that the re-
sult was a general condemnation of
the Harding administration.
But other less interested observers
see other results.
They see another recruit to the rad-
ical forces which already included
Senators Brookhart of Iowa, Ladd and

LEWIS EXPLAINS'
VITAMINE THEORYH
Declares Common Vegetables More
of Nutritious Substance Than
Prepared Foods
POTATOES AS VALUABLE AS
YEAST, SPEAKER STATES
Declaring that yeast and other ar-
tificial products, ordinarily regarded-
as rich in vitamines, contain no more
of them than ordinary vegetables,
Prof. H. B. Lewis of the physiology
department told his audience laspt
evening that the cabbage, potato and
tomato are just as beneficial as any
manufactured article supposed- to
contain large quantities of vitamines.
He went on to say, "Those who eat
yeast get no more nutritive value
from it than the more 4sensible peo-
ple who eat the right kind of vege-
tables."
He said, in speaking of the devel-
opment of the vitamine theory, that
there had been no special discoveries
made to boost this latest theory, but
that the conclusions had been arriv-
ed at by careful investigations made
by several scientists who had long
been aware that there was some ele-
ment, present in some foods and ab-
sent in others which could control the'
nutrition of animals and man. The
strange part of this mysterious sub-
stance is that it camnot be given any
chemical definition nor can the body
make its own vitamines, but must
rely on milk, butter-fats and vege-
tables to furnish them and make nu-
trition successful.
Vitamine Necessary Element
(Continued to Page Four)

5 E SUPERB IN BALL

f-

More than 90 students and fac
from the School of Education wat<
the principals and teachers teams
an 8-8 10 inning tie game of p
ground ball yesterday afternoor
Ferry field.
The faculty of the school of ed
tion beat the school superintend
by a score of .12-1l, in the sec
game of the afternoon.
The next game will be played
day afternoon between the facult
the School of Edueation and the
ulty of'jhe economics department
14 PHYSICIANBSEROL
FOR INSULIN 'COUI
The second class in the in
.treatment for diabetes given this s
mer has been opened under the d
tion of Dr.'Phillip L. Marsh, instrt
in internal medicine, with an en
ment of 14 practicing physicians
As far as it has been carried
the treatnment has proved succe:
and the members of the first class
held in this course at the Unive
are enthusiastic over the outcon

for the needs of the camp during the Frazier of North Dakota, and Ship-
three sections, but will not cover the stead of Minnesota, all banded under
expenses of the coming group of boys, the leadership of the Minnesota radi-
falling short approximately $400. cal.

See the

UNION

SUMMER

SPOT LGH

A

_s

IT)"

JRSDAY, JULY 26,

HILL AUDITORIUM, 8 P. M.

TICKETS 50c

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