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June 17, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-06-17

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THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

t tUt t r

1t~igun

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OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER SESSION OF
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN -
Published every morning except Monday during the Summer
Session by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for re-
publication of all news dispatches credited to it or otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
3ntered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
class matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $r.so.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street.
Phonies: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signa-
ture not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of faith,
and notices of events will be published in The Summer Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Summer Daily
office. Unsigned communications will receive -no consideration. No
manuscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Summer Daily does not necessarily endorse the senti-
ments expressed in the communicatonis.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR................EO J. HERSHDORFER
City Editor....................................James B. Young
Night Editors-
Howard A. Donahue George E. Sloan
Julian E. Mack
Sporting Editor............... ..Jack D. Briscoe
Women's Editor..............................Dorothy Bennetts
Editorials . ...... .................Herbert S. Case
Humor Editor ...............................Donald Coney
Assistants
W. B. Butler Leona Horwitz
G. D. Eaton
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER..................HEROLD C. HUNT
Advertising................................Townsend H. Wolfe
Publication........... ..........George W. Rockwood
Accounts................. .---.- .Laurence H. Favrot
Circulation...................................Edward,-F. Conlin
Assistants
Elizabeth J. Forsythe Clark Gibson Katherine E. Styer
Philip H. Goldsmith
0 AmTTD nA V TTTlT,T17 _192

SATURDAY, J UINhi 11, 1VLL,

Night Editor-HOWARD A. DONAHUE

C. MAURICE, ATKINSON-FRIEND
When a, sudden death overtakes a friend, we find
ourselves at a loss for words or suitable expressions
to interpret our emotion. So it is that the news of
the passing of "Maurie" Atkinson finds those of us
who knew him as a fellow-worker, as a classmate,
and as triend, in an almost inexpressible condition.
Maurie had many friends here at Michigan,
friends who held -him in high esteem, because of
his ready smile and cordial greetings, because of
his willingness to help others even though that help
meant some secrifice to himself. His college activ-
ities were marked by success, for he gave to every
task which confronted him all his energy and effort,
striving ever to make the next piece of work
,better than the one before. His was a spirit of
comradeship.
His achievements here were many, his readiness-
to serve and to aid the reasons for the success of
those achievements. Whether on student publica-
tions or in the administration of student govern-
ment, Maurie's part was always an active one.
Those who were his fellow-workers on the pub-
lications, especially, where he devoted most of his
time, and where his worth as a co-worker and more
than that as a friend, was appreciated, will feel his
passing most. They surely will miss him.
That his end should have come when he was
just on the threshold of life, ready to face the newv
battles in the same manner that he had won the old
ones, is perhaps the saddest part of it all. But he
has left behind him a name that speakt more for him
than any eulogy-and that name is Friend.
COMMENCEMENT SEATING PROBLEM
A large number who will come to Ann Arbor to
attend the Commencement exercises will perhaps
fail to understand why they have been unable to
obtain seats. Since ,the seating capacity of Hill au-
ditorium is limited, the seating problem is especially
acute. There are about seventeen hundred gradu-
tes. The main floor will be giver" over to them
and to a few prominent guests. Each one of the
graduates, as far as possible, has been allowed seats
for two guests provided they are near relatives. The
faculty will be seated on the platform as many as
can be accommodated-and the remaining must
also be arranged for. The auditorium seats ap-
proximately forty eight hundred. The alumni are
also to be provided with seats, as far as possible.
As a result, there is bound to be a shortage.. It is
hoped that those unprovided for will not be very
sorely disappointed.
Arrangements have been made to give as many
as possible the opportunity to hear Secretary of
State Hughs by radiophone. A platform will have
been constructed in front of the Chemistry building
with receiving and amplifying devises to transmit
Hughs' address to any who may assemble there.
There will also be a fine opportunity to view the
procession which will form on that side of the cam-
pus.
While it is realized that the radiophone plan will
not have the effectiveness that the personality and
presence of the speaker give, it will make up in cer-
tain measure for the unavoidable lack of accommod-
ations. In future years the construction of a field

house onr Ferry field, so large that it can take care
of an enormous audiece, will as is to be hoped, re-
niove all seating difficulties like the present one.
EVOLUTION AGAIN-WHO'S NEXT?
From Union university in Jackson, Tennessee,
comes the latest outbreak against evolution. In
fact, it seems that whenever an argument is needed
to create publicity, some of our smaller institutions
immediately set their bait for the advocate of the
theory of evolution. The Union officials are now -
seriously considering the cese of a professor who
is radical enough to believe in the theory. It is a
denominational institution, and has been notified
by the religious leaders of that denomination that
unless the professor "is eliminated from its teach-
ing staff, or declare publicly his repudiation of the
theory of evolution," they will refuse to aid the un-
iversity with their moral or financial support."
Such action scenis almost entirely out of keep-
ing with the spirit of the times and with the trend
of modern educational progress. In this age, free-
dom of thought and expression are the admitted
rights of every individual, while intolerance and
barrow-mindedness are frowned upon as obstacles
to the development of a liberal mental and spiritiual
growth. Intimidation, which is after all a form
of mental torture, was practiced by feudal barons
and leaders during the time of the Inquisition, but in
the 20th century such methods are no longer in
vogue.
Anexample such as the one' qoted above, were
the university authorities ,to accede to the de-
mands that the professor be dismissed or obliged
to denounce his belief, can be of little advantage,
and at the same time of great disadvantage, for if
it is successfully carried through, it may serve as a
dangerous and unwholesome precedent. At least, it
will be interesting to note what action Union univer-
sity will take in this matter. Perhaps the professor
may turn the tables and tender his resignation-the
worm'has been known to turn before.
Talking about questions: How many women are
going to blow out the candles .and how many are
going to taste of the bitter lesson at the Senior- Wo-
men's Breakfast?
According to present indicatioias, it seems as if
Henry Ford will have to pass many Weeks to get
Muscle Shoa4s.
How does the Union look to you, Mr. Alumnus?
Too bad the reading room has not been finished, eh?
All set for the last blue-book on Monday, senior?
. . . . ..... . . . . . . . .. . .... . . ...
THE FRYING PAN
-a flash in the Pan." ,
Swan Song
Four years (or more)
At learning's door
You madly crash th gate.
Then the members of the fanily
Come to see you graduate.
It is pretty clear
In your freshman year
That you are a total loss,
And nothing you do
Earns bread or stew
In life's game of pitch apd toss.
In your sophomore days
You mend your ways
And loop the profs for B's;
But a junior hopes

He knows the ropes
And ripples along in ease.
Tho a senior's life
Is a happy lifey
It is tinged with infiinte pain.
For you see through days
Like a golden haze
That you'll be a frosh again.
It wakes you nights
And your rest it blights
To think of the work you rate-
After the members of the family
Come to see you graduate.
In the interesting and inimitable way the daily
press has of saying what it says we are informed
that "17 College Men Hurdle Mr. Edisons, Cran-
ium Teasers." How's for a collich education to
amount to something after all. But sir, we don't
know how many cerebral trackmen jolted their
frontal lobes on the New Jersey Wizard's intellig-
ence interferers, and went out into the air.
Which makes Cal think of the mean one first
pulled by the Maginnis Troupe of Society Enter-
. tainers, on the Orpheum Cricuit in '09.
"Brain! May be, if he's got a brain-all it is is
a knot irk th eend of his spinal cord to keep his spine
from unravellin'!" CALIGULA.

.

ANYONE
WILL DIRECT YOU
to our office in the National Bank,
Bldg. and we shll be glad to
meet you and transact for you any
business in our line.
We write all forms of insurance
except life.
BUTLER
INSURANCE
209 1st Nat'l Bank Bldg.
PHONE 401-M

CO MENCEMENT

GIFTS
Gold and Silver Jewelry
Watches

Novelties

Silverware

Cold Pens and Pencils
R ings
H A LLER & FULLER
STATE STREET JEWELERS

7'

,
Isaw

- , ..
r 1
e. . ....

Gifts for Graduation
TGRAHA M'S
BOTH STORES

I

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i

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i

--
\
bt
FOR THE COOLING SWIM
There is nothing after all, quite like a cooling swim. And a jersey bathig
suit -is quite the thing. It is good-looking, wears well, and provides just the
right warmth when the day or water is just a bit nippy. Some rather swagger
color combinations and new necklines are fe'atures that you will notice in these
Suits. Priced from $3.75 a suit up.

Caps and Hats
To Complete the Suit
And you must have a cap to match
the suit-or perhaps one of contrast-
ing color. There are fancy hats with
brims for those who enjoy a sun bath
on the beach and others made in
tight fitting modes for those who
swim and dive. They come in plain
styles and with fancy flower orna-
ments. Priced from 35c up.

Vathing Shoes
To Match the Suits
Bathing shoes should match the suit
and when worn with rolled hose they
add a smart touch that is totally in-
dispensable. They come in black
and colors of canvas with cork soles
and of rubber. There are slipper
styles and others that are high.
These shoes are priced from 65c to
$1.95 a pair and will prove practi-
cal and comfortable.

Vanity and Bathing Bags
A rubber bathing bag to carry the suit to and from the bathing beach will
be especially useful and a smaller rubber vanity bag in which to carry a pow-
der puff, mirror, and handkerchief will be an addition to the bathing costume
that milady will find enjoyable. Priced from 65c each up.
(Second Floor)

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