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June 17, 1922 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-06-17

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THE WEATHER
PROBABLY SHOWERS
TODAY

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:4 III

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XIII. No. 2 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JUNE 17, 1922 PRICE FIVE CNTS

VARSITY

DEFEATS

ALUMNI,

10-9

_

i

WOLVERINES TAKE
FIRST CONTEST IN
WEEK-END SERE

WATCH FOR EXTRA

BOWERMAN,
PLAYER,.

'95, FORMER
PROVES STAR
GAME

GIANT
OF

GRADS THREATEN WITH
THREE RUNS IN NINTH
Perrin Gets Clean Batting Record;
Both Sides Show Poor Work
in Field
Michigan's Varsity baseball team
had a close call yesterday and just
barely nosed out the Alumni team, 10
to 9, when Shackleford stretched his
triple and came home on a wild throw
by the alumni right fielder, scoring
the winning run in the last half of the
ninth inning. The old timers made
three runs in their half of the ninth
and tied the score..
The feature of the game was the
catching of Dr. Frank Bowerman o\
the class of '95, who, is back to his
30th reunion. He threw out several
Varsity players during the course of
the game, and when they tried to re-
move him in the ninth to let Elmer
'Mitchell, '12, pinch hit, ,it was dis-'
covered that there was no other catch-
er to take his place and he had to
continue. In the sixth inning he got
on' bases because of an error and
scored a run. He struck out once, hit
twice to the infield -and was thrown
out, and once was out on an outfield
fly. For 12 years Bowerman was with
the New York Giants, and up until the
lest few years when he was retained
as a coach he caught regularly. He
played here two years on the Varsity.
'09 Has Unique Band
The class of '09 arrived at the game
just after the first inning had start-
ed with a band of their own and all
dressed in Maize and Blue Zowve
costumes. Other classes had their
own dress and the audience, although
small, was brilliantly clothed and en-
thusiastic. The Varsity band and the
class band kept at it most of the time
during the first few innings, but as the
game welt along and became closer,
more interest was shown in the game,
and the bands were quieter.
In the ninth inning the alumni, who
were three runs behind, tied the score.
Hughitt, '15, of football fame, was
walked by Elliott. Perrin, '21, made
his fourth hit of the game, a two bag-
.ger, but Hughitt was held up at third.
Ohilmacher, '20, was put in as a pinch
hitter for Lathers and made a whit
through Knode, Shackleford getting
the ball. His throw to home was a lit-
tle wild and Blott missed it, allowing
two runs to come in. Hill, '11, the
captein of the Alumni, who was play-
ing first base, hit several fouls, but
was to anxious to connect and struck
out. Van Boven, '21, up next hit a
,hot 'one to the' right of second base,
scoring Ohmacher from second. Bow-
erman flied out to Shackleford. Three
runs were scored tying the count.
In the Varsity's half of the inning,
Knode was out at first by Hill, unas-
sisted. Shackleford hit to right field
for three bases, but Cooper threw wild
trying to nab him at that base, and
Shack went on home for the wipning
xrun.
IUtley Hit Freely
The Varsity got to Utley, the alum-
ni pitcher, n the sixth. Blott lifted
one to left field for three bases, and
then Elliott got behind one that went
over the fielder's head and he com-
pleted the circuit, scoring Blott. How-
ever, when he went by second base
he failed to touch it, and the umpire
called him out. Uteritz stepped up to
the plate and joined in the melee by
making another four base clout.
Wimbles grounded out and Shackle-
ford after getting a walk was thrown
out by Bowerman trying to steal

The Summer Daily will have
an extra on the streets Monday
morning immediately following
the Commencement exercises in
Hil auditorium. The paper will
carry Secretary Charles A.
Hughes' address to the grad-
uating classes, President Marion
L. Burton's baccalaureate speech,
and pictures of the principal
speakers.
BOARD CUTS SLI1CE1
IN RAILPAYROLL
Clerks, Signal Men and Firemen Get
From Two to Six Cents Hour
Wage Cut.,
ACTION MAY BRING STRIKE
VOTE OF ROAD EMPgOYES

(By Associated Press)
Chicago, Ill., June 16.-Pruning
nearly $27,000,000 from the annual pay
roll of 325,000 railway employees by
cutting clerks, signal men and sta-
tionary firemen from two to six cents
an hour, the United States Railroad
Labor Board today announced another
wage slash,, bringing total reduc-
tion under the board's orders up to
$135,000,000 beginning July 1.,
Clerks were cut three and one-
fourth cents an hour, according to
classification, signal men five cents,
and firemen two cents.' Approximately
1,200,000 railway employees will share
the total reduction which has brought
vigorous protest from every union or-
ganization involved and is expected to
result in a strike vote of 10 railway
labor bodies.
The voting already was under way
in seven unions. A dihsenting opin-
ion, protesting against any reduction
was included in the decision by labor
members.
Definite recognition of 'a "living
wage" and "saving wage" was made
for the first time by the board in to-{
day's decision. Although abnormal
postwar conditions were pointed out
as obstructions to fixing any new sci-
entific living or saving wage at pres-
ent, the board declared that as soon as
this condition cleared away, it would
"give increased consideration to all
the intricate details incident to the
scientific adjustment" of such a wage.j
The bulk of those hit by the new
cut will be 200,000 clerks, and 100,000
stationary employees.
CAMPUSINSGAL DRESS
FOR SE[iORPROMENADE
Michigan's campus will be in 'gala
dress tonight,cwith Japanese lan-
terns and arc lights as the members
of all senior classes in the University
join in the traditional march of the'
Senior Promenade.'
The order of formation for the
Promenade will be as follows: Lits onw
the diagonal facing the Law building;
Engineers on the. diagonal facing the{
engineering building; Architects be-
hind engineers; School of Education
on the diagonal at north side of the
pharmaceutical building; Medics be-
hind the School of Education; Laws
on walk leading to Waterman gymna-
sium; Dents behind Laws; Pharmicsl
on Chemistry building walk east oft
the flag pole; Homoeops behipd Phar-
mics; Nurses behind Homoedps.

ENGINEERS HOLD
CLASS FETES;LITS
CANCEL EXERISES
DOW, EMERY AND MOORE GIVE
STUDENT ORATIONS BEFORE
StNIORS
DEAN COOLEY TALKS oN
WORLD'S WORK TASKS
Expresses Importance of Keeping
Profession to High Pre-War
Standards
Class ,day exercises were contin-
ued today with the speeches by mem-
bers of the senior Engineering class-
es at the quadrangle at Engineering
arch.
Douglas Dow gave rpminiscences of
the history of the class during the
past four years. George F. Emery
gave his version of the probable fu-
ture of the members of the class. E.
F. Moore delivered the oraion, speak-
ng upon "The Ideal Graduate".
The principal address was delivered
by Dean Mortimer E. Cooley, who en-
deavored to impress upon the seniors
the importance of their mission in
the worlds' work, and the weight o
the problems which they must face.
Dean Cooley expressed the belief
that an international federation of
Engieers would serve to bring to the
profession the recognition which it
deserves, and which, he said, it act-
ually pos'sessed "up until the signing
of the Armistice".
At the close of the program a reso-
lution of regret and sympathy was
passed by the class upon the death of
C. Maurice Atkinson, '22.
Lits Cancel Exercises
> All class exercises of the senior
Literary class were cancelled because
of Atkinson's death. The following
resolution was submitted for publi-
cation following the news of his
death:
"We, the members of the Literary
class of 1922, desire to express our
deepest sorrow upon the death of our
friend and classmate, C. Maurice At-.
kinson. We wish to extend to his
family our most sincere sympathy
and to express to them our apprecia-
tion of his unselfish and untiring ef,
forts in the interest of our class.
"We shall cherish the memory of
our classmate, C. Maurice Atkinson,
in after life. The memory of his
work here and his ideals will serve
perhaps to alleviate the pain of our
loss."
THE LITERARY CLASS OF 1922.
Walter B. Rea, Presidept. ,
ALUMNI ROLL CALL
APPROACHES 1,000
Alumni enrollment up to the time
of 'the plosiig of the aregistration
booth in Alumni Memorial hall reach-
ed 925, according to' Wilfred B. Shaw,
secretfry of the Aumni association.
Although no exact figures had been
compiled, it was estimated that the
classes of 1919, 1920, and 1921 had the
largest representation at the reunions.
Several of the older classes also had a
comparatively large roll call.
Asked what total enrollment he ex-
pected, Secretary Shaw declared that
he, figured that tomorrow's registra-
tion would bring the present average
up to approximately 2,000 visiting

graduates.
Scott Will Write Book- on Usage
Prof. F. N. Scott, of the rhetoric de-
partment, will use the Plimpton col-
lection in Ne4w York this summer,' in
gathering material for the bpok he
is writing on. "Usage."
The Plimpton collection consists of
books and treatises on grammar, rhe-
toric, and kindred subjects, and was
collected by Mr. Plimpton, of ¬ęGinn
and company. It is the finest collec-
tion of its kind, according to Profes-
sor Scott.

C, MAURICE ATKINE
WHEN AUTO HIT
OTHERS SUSTA1
"We, the Publication Board
of the Univerity of Michigan,.
have learned with the deepest
personal sorrow of the death
of our member, C. Maurice At-
kinson. We desire to extend
to his family our sincerest sym-
pathy in their great loss, and to
C. MAURICE ATKINSON, '22, TREAS- express to them our apprecia-
urer of senior literary class, who tion of the value of his serv-
died Friday morning as a result of ices to our Board and t'o the
injuries sustained in auto accident. University at large.
"Individually we shall fmourn
our friend, C. Maurice Atkin-
son,as a Michigan student, who
LEAGUEgUniversity and to his personal,
gaiverhimself n titinglysonthl
EGfriends; and shall cherish his
memory as a stimulus and as an
incentive to all Mihigan men."
THE BOARD IN C NTROL OF
Announcement Made at Meeting of STUDENT PUBLICATIONS.
Alumnae Council; Donor's Name
Not Disclosed
CAMPAIGN PLANS FOR NEXT islation, Helen Bates, '18, reportedon
YEAR'S WORK COMPLETED similar buildings in other institutions
and Frances Ames, '23, president of
Announcement of a gift of $2,500 to the Women's league for next year,
the Michigan League building fund ,made a report of the work of the
was made at the annual alumnae Jeague during the year 1921-1922.
luncheon given yesterday noon at Bet- The report of the nominating com-
sy Barbour house as the concluding mittee was accepted and Mrs. Her-
event of the June meeting of the bert Goulding was re-elected treasur-
Alumnae council. The gift was made er of the Alumnae Council. Owing to
by a member of the class of '75, but the change in the organization for the
the name was withheld. Another gift coming year, it was impossible to elect
of $1,000 has also been received re- a secretary as would have been done
cently from Louise Fiarman, of Chi- ordinarily.
cago. " More than 150 alumnae attended the
Plans for the Michigan League cam- annual luncheon given at 1 o'clock at
paign for next year were discussed at Betsy Barbour house. Mrs. Harry B.
the general alumnae meeting yester- Hutchins, Mrs. Marion L. Burton, and
day morning. The decision was made Mrs. Junius E. Beal were guests of
to carry on the work another year honor.
through the Alumnae Council without
employing a campaign agency. It was
also decided to create an office of di- ATilT
rector of the campaign and to pay a
suitable salary ,for this work.
Duties Increase
The executive committee of the
Alumnae Council was given authority
to appoint not more than five new (By Associated Press)
members, this addition being neces- New York, -June 16.-The athletic
sary because of the increase of work situation at Yale is so befuddled and
and responsibility. It was also decided mishandled that it seems nothing
to ask each alumnae association to short of a cmplete remoldin of the
make an effort to contribute toward g
the campaign expenses for next year system of control, finance and coacly
on a basis of $2 for each person elig- ing will serve to remedy it, says a re-
ible to the local group. port of the voluntary committee of
It was also decided advisable to Yale athletics made public by Chair-
have a general advisory committee of man George S. Trevor.
ien appointed by the Alumni associa- The committee declares that it rep-
tion in consultation with the execu- resents the views of "a large number
tive committee and an advisory f- of Yale men, former captains, mem-.
nance committee to assist in working bers of present teams, coaches and.
out the more important problems of .graduates" interested in Yale sports.
Reot eemd ythe chair-n . Many graduates feel that those who
Reports were made by the chair- control at Yale have somehow fumbld
.man of all standing committees. Mrs. the ball, says the report which, partie
Herbert Goulding, '97, gave the treas- ularly assails Prof. Clarence Mendell,
urer's report, which showed that at chairman of the athletic control com
present $55,334.04 has been pledged to mittee.
the Michigan League for building an-
endowment, of which $17,550 has beenE
paid. Evan olbrook, '03, report IL IN FINL
Mr .E a s H l r o '3 e otdthat during the last year 23 new al-- n m u u n
umnae groups have been organized, PEEUMLI O
making a total of 50 organized Mich-
igan alumnae groups. In the majority-
of cases Mrs. Holbrook has visited the As a fitting close of a successful
various cities and aided in the organ- four years together the girls of the

ization work. She will make an ex- class of twenty-two gathered at the
tended trip through the western states Whisseyftheaty-t ngttodwite
during the latter part of the summer Whitney theater last night to witness
in accordatice with the decision made the final performance of Promander
by the Alumnae Council at their meet- Walk, this year's senior girls' play.
ing Thursday afternoon. When this Played by members of the class who
trip has been completed the entire
United States will have been covered have all been prominent in dramatic
for the purpose of organization, circles on the campus and' who have
Reports Given taken part in various productions, the
Mrs. Max Winkler, '93, gave a re- presentation last night was more than
port on classes of membership, Mrs. .expected.
0. J. Schlotterbeck, '97, reported on Although it took- a short time for
building plans, Mrs. Shirley W. Smith, several of the characters to get into
made a report for Mrs. W. B. Pills- their parts, by the end of the first
bury, '05, on organizations to func- act the play had assumed an almost
tion in the Michigan League. Miss 'professional tone. A moderately large
Fandlira Crocker, '86, reported on leg- audience was in attendance.

ION, '22 KILLED,
S 4TRUCK;THREE
IN MINOR INJURIES
THROWN FROM MACHINE IN
COLLISION; DIES TWO
HOURS LATER
TOOK PROMINENT PART I
IN CAMPUS ACTIVITIES
J. M. Bowers, '22, Driver of Car, Hi-
dred Henry, '22, and Helen
McInfosh, '22, Also Hurt
Commencement season was sadden-
ed by an auto accdnt early Friday
morning in which C. Maurice Atkin-
son, '22, was fatally injured when the
automobile driven by James M. Bow-
ers, '22-'25M, collided with a truck
on the Washtenaw road ,at a curve
about two miles from the city. The
accident occurred about 12:45 o'clock
and Atkinson died at 3 o'clock yester-
day morning in the University hospi-
tal.
Did Not See Truck
The auto party composed of Maurice
Atkinson, James M. Bowers, Helen L.
McIntosh, '22, and Mildred ,. Henry,
'22, left the Union, where they had
'attended the Senior reception and -
started for ,a .ride about 12:30
o'clock. Shortly after they had passed
the county farm, Bowers passed a car
driven by Harold Lauver, '22E, which
was proceeding in the same direc-
tion, and as he turned back to the
center of the road the rear part of
his machine swerved into the ap-
proaching truck, which he had. failed
to see. The truck was being, driven
by Bert Johnson, negro, of Detroit.
The Bower machine was turned -
completely around, and the rear seat
almost wrenched from the body by
the force of the impact. Miss McIn-
tosh and Atkinson, who were occu-
pying the rear seat, were thrown from
the car, the latter sustaining minor
injuries. Bowers and Miss Henry al-
so received minor cuts and bruises.
Joseph H. Failing of Ann Arbor,
who passed shortly after the acci-
dent, hurried Atkinson to the Uni-
versity hospital, where he died at 3
o'clock without regaining conscious-
ness.
Drivers Held Blameless
Prosecuting Attorney Jacob Fahr-
ner, who is investigating the acci-
dent, stated yesterday that he could
see no reason for attaching blame on
either of the drivers.
Johnson, the driver of the truck,
says that he is at a loss to under-
stand how the accident could have
happened. The occupants of the truck
were members of a negro baseball
team.
Atkinson, duiing his four years in
the University, was active in campus
'work, having been business manager
of Chimes, a member of the Board in
Control of Publications and of the
Student Advisory committiee, and
treasurer of his class during his sen-
ior year. He was a member of Mich-
igauma, Sphinx, Pi Delta Epsilon, the
Pressman's club and Kappa Sigma,
fraternity.?
The parents of the deceased, Mr.
and Mrs. Orie Atkinson of Battle
Creek, arrived in Ann Arbor yester-
day morning.
Funeral services were held at the

Kappa Sigma fraternity house at 3
o'clock yesterday. Family services
will be held at the Atkinson resi-
dence in Battle Creek this afternoon,
and buried will be made at Amboy,
Ind.
Dr. May to Teach Summer Courses
In conjunction with the school for
athletic coaches being conducted by
Coach iFelding H. Yost this summer,
,Dr. George A. May, director of Wa-
terman gymnasium, will give a course
in physical education for those in-
:erested in this, work. All kinds of
apparatus work and gymnastics will
be emphasized by Dr. May in the
course of the instruction.

COMMENCEMENT GUIDE .

A list of commencent activi-
ties together with the time and
place of their occurrence, will
be found in the "What's Going
On" column on page four. This
column will serve as a com-
mencement guide until the close
of the period.'

d. '
he Varsity started out with a bang
the first inning. A hit by Utertiz
1 Knode and several errors ac-l

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