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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 13, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-07-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THIS MODERN "LITERATURE"

* NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER SESSION OF
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
led every morning except Monday during the Summer
the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ssociated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for re-
of, all news dispatches credited to it or otherwise
this paper and the local news published therein.
d at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second'
x.
iption by carrier or mail, $1.5o.
Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street.
S usiness, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
unications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signa-
,cessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of faith,
of events will be published in The Summer Daily at the
of the Editor, if left at ors mailed to The Summer Daily
signed communications will receive no consideration. No
will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
ummer Daily does not necessarily en'dorse the senti-
-essed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
TG EDITOR ...........LEO J. 1ERSHDORFER
.....................................James B. Young
ard A. Donahue Julian E. Mack
ditor ................................Dorothy Bennetts
oard................Herbert S. Case, Elizabeth Nylund
to ....................................Donald Coney
.ditor...............................G. D. Eaton
Assistants

In studying the literature of the present day,
which the hoi polloi accepts almost blindly as good'
literature, one cannot wonder at its inferiority. Of
course 'there are great American. writers, but these
are looked upon and classified as eithler pagan or too
sensuous, and unfortunately the American public is
barred from reading "that sort of stuff." On look-
ing around for good reasons as to why such writ-
ers are really great, it is to be found that the thing
which impresses one most is not their literary and
rhetorical ramblings but that their writings are the
serious thoughts of men who doubt and wonder at
the most extraordinary things of life. They write
because they see back of all a hidden thing; they
break through -the superficialities of life. They
know that life's only riddle is life itself. But un-
fortunately, the tendency of modern writers is to
overlook the importance of philosophy in literatulre.
There are many present day authors who regard
philosophy as useless and mere rubbish. And in so
far as/ they ignore the philosophical background in
literature, they fail miserably.
Most of our literature can not last."' It is too
simple, mechanical, and meaningless. It strives for
nothing, drives at nothing and accomplishes no more.
History has shown that only literature which is
subtle, introspective and reflective, life penetrating,
and philosophical, can survive. Homer, Dante,
Shakespeare and Goethe have lived and will al-
ways live. They dealt with that reflective view o
human experience directed essentially to discover
what is trute, permanent and real-they dealt with
philosophy itself. One can not but condemn ithe
attitude of many of the modern writers who know
nothing of philosophy, and furthermoi-e, do not care
for it.
Somebody started something' when they began
these strikes. The latest is that the harem attend-
ants in Turkey have gone on a strike.' Professors
next? Wouldn'tthat he sad?
We don't blame ,Detroit people for not support-
ing an Italian Opera company.
{#. . ...,....{{.{ t.{*#{fi##..... i.{ .............a,......... :....
T HE FRYI NG PAN
"-a flash in the Pan.".
' "M'"""il" " " "

For Your Sun

BOOKS

II

from

BGRAHAM'
Both Stores

S

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a*

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6 :oo
a. m., 7:ooa.i., 8:oo a.in., 9:oo a. tn. and
hourly to 9:05 p. m.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbo.-9.:47 a. m. and every two hours to
Local Cars, East Bound-5:5s a. m., 7:00
a. m. and every two hours to g:oo p. M.;
zii:oo p. m. 'To Ypsilanti only--11:40 P." i.,
12z:5,a. in., i S a. i.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
-Local Cars, West Bound--r:So a.,im., 2:40
p. n
To Ja kson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
S8:.47, 10:17, a.,in.; 12247, 2:-47, 4:47 P.in.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limnited: 8:47
. .

FRIDAY, JULY 4
WIMOR.ELA E
DANCING PAVNL
Kennedy's All Stars
Diamond - Zierer - Chon - Daring Hammill
-
_

1922
S

JULY
tR T W

2N
9
10
28
80

3
10
17
21
31

4
11
18
2J,

12
19
26

1922
T F
6 7 8
13 14 15
20 21 22
27 28 29

ler

C. R. Trotter
Sidney Kripk

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
MANAGER ...................HEROLD C. HUNT
. Townsend H. Wolfe
.. .........George W. Rockwood
..Laurence H. Favrot
.......Edward F. Conlin

PANAMA AND STRAW HATS
Prices for Cleaning P ananas $1.26 up.
Prices for stiff siraws.......75 up.
We do only high class work.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
Rented, old, Repaired
0. D. MORRILL
V7 Nickels Arcade

A place to bring your friends. Nowhere is
the food better; nowhere is the service
more prompt. Open all summer.
TUTTLE'S LUNCH ROOM
MAYNARV5 STREET

- a - ~r

. :

r : ' rt aw:°

s1
.,

DANCE

SUSTERKA -,AKE

-

Assistanto

Goldsmith

Katherine E. Styer
B. watson Shoesmiith

,}

THURSDAY, JULY 13, 1922
Night Editor-HOWARD A.DONAHUE
Assistant-hack Briscge
MERITED LAURELS
y so often there is brought to the public's no-
ple with the strength of claracter to over-
I handicaps in the pursuit of some ambition.
does not often find individuals who, by their
orts, can overcome physical deficiencies car-
im childhood, and -rise to a remarkable stage
cincy in lines where these would be a decid-
tale, as dibd Brutus Kerr Hamilton, wvho
he Anerican decathlon and pentathlon cham-
ps, and who has just finished - one of the.
versatile athletic careers by graduating from
iversity of Missouri.
ilton was pronounced incurable of hip dis-
ien a child, and has made such a remarkable
for himself with one leg a full inch shorter
ie other.. He participated in the Olympic
at Antwerp in 1920. Not only did he excel
etics, but he 'graduated with next to high-
:rs in schlastic work.
will to do the seemingly impossible thing and
t in such a way that the world will sit up
e notice is an accomplishment truly worthy of
or it' is not the result of some natural gift
igth, but it is one that has been worked for
well earned.
FOR A MESS OF POTTAGE
nized labor continues to strengthen its claim
ie heritage of distrust 'and suspicion = a
e of public mental aspect, which is the natur-
owth of strike disorders.
rning with the claim that "collective bargain-
th employers was their goal, certain bodies
kmen banded themselves into labor unions.
their demands for higher wages were met
fisal, they attempt to cut off the supply of all
e 1abor. Failing via the mandatory ropte,
ye resorted to personal violence and lawless-
Striking laborers have .been guilty of mur-
on, manslaughter and bomb planting.
r leaders loudly deny that lawlessness is
led by the unions, which is quite superflu-
that it is rather beyond the presumption of
,anization to authorize the' breaking of the
or movement has come to signify something
tinged 'with anarchy, and, when men "see
ey are not in condition to inspire pubic con-i
and admiration. Laboring men are en-
aafull measure of economic and social priv-
for this is a right that none will deny them.
, the world has long recognized the f ct
.n should organize for their own mutual ben-
. protection. That ,same world sympathizes
e working men when their cause is a just
t has little regard for those who always add
t to' the general group by radical non-ben-
ets.
trikers should, however, if for no other reas-
to protect their own interest, curb the out-
oi these few faith-breakers, lest the world
on lose confidence in the ability of the un-
maintain their integrity as functioning or-
ons, and so that it cannot be' said that they
ig their heritage for a mere mess of pot-

Between Ypsilauti and'Belleville oil the Rivet Road
3,000 square feet dancing floor.

The Typewriter and
Stationery

storeI

Dances on Wednesday, Saturday and Sk nday
Evenings, 8:30 to 11:30
KOD AK F I NEIS I

Some
Some
Some
S onmIe

At the. Summer Session
are school girls, some are not.
are icy, others hot.
are school ma'ams, old and gray.
are flappers, blithe and gay.
o'1 crutches, some with canes.
are dumb and soihe have brains,
are wild and hard as rock-

YOU WILL FIND THE

Farmers
and Mcchanics Bank

U

Sone
Some<

-4 Bt most go in at nine o'clock..
LUKE WARM.
"How did Jeane run in the beauty contest?"
"Not so bad. She lost by a nose.' /
If a man blushes when you ask him the time,
there's a woman in the case.
The Intimacy of Nature
Beneath the trees upon the grass
A prof brought out his sizzling class,
To court a draught or chance a br'eeze
That might add interest to his wheeze
On history dry.

A pleasant, conven-
ient and SAFE place
to transact your
business.
TWO OFFICES:
101-105 South Main St.
330 South State St.
Nickels' Arcade

Our prints are made on Velox.
Materials that are Eastman made and mc
ods that are Eastman approved, plus
experience of our experts ane guaraIties
finest quality finishing.
r rig us y0 film$

IU _

PSTADLIXME

The studes sat down upon the ground;
About the prof they gathered round.
In varied pose they came to rest
And gave the.deepest'interest-
To autos passing by.
Just at this time a king of bugs .
Whose winter habitat was rugs
Led out his clan to get the air
And have a, change of bill-of-fare
Beneath the sky.

IMember of the Federal Reserve
HOW ABOUT
THESE?
Covered fancy $1'9
Hampers - -
Guaranteed Carpet
Sweepers - - -
Laundry $ .39
Kits - - - -
Graniteware Specials
2 Kettles, Pails, etc.,
= dollar values, - 619C
B Straw Hats >
2 frdm - 10C'
Stationery
2 We are closing some extra good
2 grades at 1-4 less.
Shirts, Hosiery and
Underwear 2
2 Men, if you want to save, try
= this store for these items.
Many new things in DISHES.
-
209-11 East washington Street

:I _'

P
.

< A

IVI ed t e r r

A

35 DAY TOUR
All Charges Inluded

-

Azores, Qibralter, Naples,
us, Constantnop l, RA

Pirae-
gi qs

The studes soon fled with cries of pain .
Before their vigorous campaign,
And left the prof still standing there
Looking about with puzzled air
To seek the reason why.
TRILOBITE BILL.
Today's Feuilleton
We were basking in the coolth of the Union
reading roomA and at one and the same time inhal-
ing wisdom from the old ec. book. To concentrate
on the knotty problem we closed our eyes. Some
rude hand shook us.
"'Come awake !" cried Abel Playfair, one of the
golden youths of the Summer session we are unan-
imous in avoiding.
"Not asleep," I aseverated. "I'm thinking."
"Maybe so, but you think pretty noisy/' burbles-
Abel. "Listen! Congratulate me. I'm engaged to
marry the dearest girl in the world."
"Oh congrats, of course," says I. "But I hope
you wont find her so expensive as all that."
.Whereupon he purveys to our suffering ears the
praises of this queen arong women that has con-
sented his piece of ice on the left digit. Then he
breaks the glad tidings for her sweet sake he is
learning to play the noble Celtic game of golf.
"Fine !" we says, interested. "What do you go
around in ?"

Fast American, Twin-Crew, 15,000 ton Mail Ste
"PHILADELPHIA"
A Yankee Ship, A Yankee Crew, saiAg Augu
Accommodations reserved for regular
east and west bound passengers-
D ir e c t connectio-os to Spanish,
Swiss, Italian, and Nr East Poipts'
APply at the office of 7he Su:ser 'NYhigan )ai
JOHN J..DWYER, General Passenger Agent,
New York-Naples Steatship C mpa'y
150 Broadway, New York City

BRING YOUR IDEAS TO THE
ANN ARBOR CUSTOM
SHOT FACTVORY
We will make use of them and the best
leather to maeke your shoes. Bring Your
repairs to our factory at 534 FOREST

i

1'

1

TennisI
RPacket Rei
24 Hour = ,

A nnArbor
Savings Bank
Two Offices:
N. W. Corner Main and Huron
707 N. University Ave.

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ext to Aroade

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