100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 13, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-07-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

L7,j

mv r

WARiMER

itr

tl

DAY

.A

AND NIGHT
SERVICE

__ --- .

No. 18

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JULY' 13, 1922

PRICE. ri

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JULY~ 13, 1922 PT~T(1'I~ WP

,r ,t

DACE

BID

MEETS

FLAT

REFUS

y

iD KEADS TURN
WRPROPOAL OF
AC ECON FER ENCE
E OPPORTUNITY TO MEET
E'H F. It. JEWELL, UNION
LEADER-.
)RE HOOPER'S OFFER
TRIKE ARBITRATION
e Recall of Walkout Only Way
lear to Resume Former
Negotiations

EXCHANGE CLUBS
TO GATHER HERE
Three hundred members of Michi-
gan Exchange clubs will gather here
on July 20, to celebrate the "Charter
Night" of " the newly organized local
branch of the club. Members of the
Exchange clubs of Detroit, Jackson,
Lansing, Monroe, Toledo and Adrian
will attend the affair.
The program will include golfing,
an inspection iof the University, and
a dinner in the evening, at which the
formality of presenting the charter
to the Ann Arbor club will take place.
The Union will be headquarters for,
the affair.

SETTLEMEINT PLA-N
I FOR A H IT
MINE OWNERS GIVE FAVORABLE
RESPONSE TO ARBITRATION.
OFFER
HARDING SAYS REPLY
ASSURES ACCEPTANCE
Union Continues Evasive Policy, Fail.
ing to Indicate Stand .in-
Matter

IARVARD FALSE TO TWO HUNDRED
YEARS OF TRADITION --SLONIMSKY

(By W. Bernard Butler)'
"Harvard is being false to 200 years
of tradition," said Dr. H. Slonimsky
last night in my interview with him
on the question of "The Narrow-
Minded and Prejudice of College
Men.'" Dr. Slonimsky is an eminent,
student of the Jewish belief and is'
delivering a series of lectures on' the
Prophetc Religion before members
of the Summer session.
"Harvard seeks to limit the Inum-
ber of Jews entering tie university,"
continued Dr. Slonimsky, "by requir-
ing them'to take certain psychological
Says Country Is Beehive of Industry;
All Classes of People Are
Working
CLAIMS BUSINESS MEN GIVE
LITTLE HEED TO WAR DEBT

hfcago, July 13.-A flat Trefusal to
t with E. M. Jewell, head of the
king shopmen, to discuss peace
posals was the answer tonight of
way executives to a proposal made
B. W. Hooper, chairman of the Un-
States railroad labor board.
& a letter to Mr. Hooper, the execu-
s declared the "issu'e raised is ot
for consideration between the car-
r' and the representatives of the
anized crafts, on strike except
ugh the further orderly processes
>re the United State railroad labor
State Objections
sserting that the strike was a re-
1 to accept the. results of the ar-
ation of the labor board, the let-
declared that no conference con-
ent upon the abdonment of the de-
on of the board was "neither per-
gable nor tolerable" because it
.ld place the carriers participating
'eia in apparent co-operation with
e on strike in , seeking to find
.ns to subver; the decisio of the
r board. !
hie letter conpluded, however, that
irompt recall of the stiike orders
id permit the. resumption of form-
nethods of cbnference and permit
cnsideration of an matters which
esentatives o employees would
to submit."
Sheeler Rhead
'ease n Thid
?aculty Concert
(By r. C. Trotter)
. a well-balanced program which
wed to great advantage their splen,-
musical tlents, William Wheeler,
[ of thevoic department, and Mrs.
ge B. Rheadi, teacher of advanced
o work, in the School of Music,
the third ;faculty concert of the
iner sessloh program last nighf
!ill auditorum.
s. Rhead opened her program with
ante and variations, in F minor
{aydn. Bginning with a simple
ve, it dev loped into a'complexity
ans, and tills, finally culminating
forte cliax. .
lk Songs from the Hebrides, sung
Ur. Wheeiler, formed the second
p of the iprogram. These songs
e collected and arranged by Mar-
ennedy ,Fraser,' who spent sev-
ears inthe Hebrides learning
1 from the natives, They were or-
lly sung 1i Gaelic, parts of which
been retained in the refrains, and
related to,'the Irish and Highland
songs, in that respect.
*caus of the great range of ex-
sian afforde, by these songs, so
irably rendered by Mr. Wheeler,<
were easily the outstanding feat-
of his program. -
'ilowing Mr Wheelers first groupi
ngs were three sletions by Mrs.
ad. Rachmaninoff's, Prelude, Ma
>r, which she played .with a fine
e for grauations in tomie, was fol-
d by Etude, D fiat, b Liszt, a
lant composition in vhich her '
nique reached its height. Com-t
ly contrasted in tone, bui no less
tically treated, was her list num-
whose repeated melody aid vivid ,

WORK TAKES SHAPE
ON NEW BUILDINGS

tests or to have interviews with the
dean. It is a sin!" The speaker went
on to say that Harvard was acting
- contrary to the moral principles on
.which this country, its constitution,
was built.
War Bred Prejudige
I asked him what was the reason
of the underlying cause for this pre-
judice which had grown .up in Har-
yard and at other great institutions
of learning throughout the UnitedC
States, not only as evidenced,by ac-
tion such as Harvard has taken but
also by the high degree of Ku-Klux-
Klan organization . that had taken
place in their faculties. He relied
that this narrow mindedness was the
immediate reaction of the general
hatred which the war has bred. This
feeling, he said, is the reaction of the
war.
"It is said that the youth of these'
universities should lose their ideal-
ism, for if youth loses its idealism,
-from where is our idealism to come?"
the speaker added. He stresesd the
idea that the uifrest, the prejudice
and bigotry which is so dominant in
the world today is the after- effect of
war. "If war is to continue the lib-
eral feelings and movements and in-
stitutions will perish," he declared.

'122 GRIDs
REMAINS ELI89KILI

Excavation Begun on Engineering
Laboratories and Practice
High School
. START WORK ON INTERIOR
FINISHING OF LIBRARY
During the last few days the most
marked progress in the Unversity's
building program has been that ef-
facted in the new engineering shops
and laboratories building excavation.
From the small hole for the basement
of the building, the excavation has
grown to a larger comparatively shal-
low space. To accommodate the air
ducts for the building the steam shovel
is now digging out a deeper hole from
the main excavation.
In addition to the work of excavat-
ing, concrete footings for the building
are being poured.,
Although the work of excavating for
the practice high school has not been
started, that will commence as soon
as the slight changes in the strue-
tural '-plans of the building are com-
pleted.
At the present time, the exterior of,
the Clements' Library bulding as 'as-
sumed its final form. The progess
which is being made in this structure+
is not so evident, for most of the work
yet to be done is on the interior. The
milled work is being finished in Grand
Rapids plants and will. be .shipped
here as soon as needed. The roof
layers will arrive probably today to
put on the gravel roof which will be
fiished by the end -of this week.
Pouring of the concrete floors is to be-
gin within short time. /
By the recent action of the city of
Ann Arbor that section of East Uni-
versity avenue over which the pao-
posed Medical school building will
eventually extend, Will be closed.
ONE KILL INJURED9
A S FLYERH-NITS FRIGHT
Kansas City, Mo., July 12.-One per-
sorn is known to have been killed and
15 others injured in a wreck on the7
outskirts of Kansas City tonight, when1
the Pueblo flyer, No. 11, on the Mis-t
souri Pacific railroad, struck a freightt
train in a head-on collision.l
BRITON AND AUSTRALIAN WIN
EUROPEAN TENNIS TOURNAMENTr
Wimbledon, July 12.-J. 0. Ander-1
son, of Australia, and Randolph Ly-
cett, of Great Britain, today won the1
men's doubles tennis championship in
the international grass court tourna-t
ment here by defeating Gerald Patter-
son and Pat O'Hara Wood, both ofI
Australia, 3-6, 7-9, 6-14, 6-3, 11-9.x
Dr. Burrett Elected Homoeop Head
Dr. Claud A. Burrett, for inine years
professor of surgery in the Homoeo-
pathic school, has been elected presi-
dent of the national Institute of Hom-
oeopathy having its convention in Chi-
cao this week.

(By Associated Press)
Washington, July 12.-Anthracite
mine owners. today submitted a re-
sponse to the government's offer of
arbitration in the coal situation that
President Harding was said to regard
as a complete acceptance.
Manwhile the miners' uniOn and,
to a degree, the bituminous coal op-
eratdrs continued 'to pursue a policy
which high officials declared was in-
tended to evade or delay an immedl-
ate response, and which officials said
was a means of disposition to reject
the government settlement plan if
public opinion would approve such a
source.-t
John L. Lewis, president of the
United Mine Workers of America, and
other officials of that organization
called on Secretary Davis today and
were understood to be endeavoring to
induce the President to make the ar-
bitration proposal apply to- all the
partially unionized territories as well
as the mining area shut down by the
bituminous strike. So far as the
willingness of anthracite operators to
settle was concerned Mr. Lewis said,
''Arbitration in the anthracite fields
would be considered by the mine
workers along with the bituminous
arbitration porposal and the general
policy comittee meeting Saturday."
Responses from the bituminous in-
dustries, it was evident, would not be
in the President's hands before Mon-
day. ,
REHEARSLSSTARTED
FORk UNION SPOTLIGHT
ADDITIONAL STAFF MEMBERS
NAMED; STUDENT 'WRITES
NEW PLAY
Clever vaudevilIV acts, medley songs,
dancing and a skit are features of the
summer Spotlight to be given Thurs-
day night, July 27, in Hil auditoriui.
Howard Donahue, ,24, has been ap-
pointed to take charge of pulicity.
Lawrence Favrot, '24, and Harold
Hunt, '23, will plan the 1kogram.
Ross Campbell, '23, is assistant to the
general chairman.'
While several of te acts have al-
ready been secured, and are being re-
harsed, there Is still opportunity for
tryouts. It is desired that as much
talent as possible here this summer
be used. Anyone having ideas' or
acts are asked to communicate with'
Jack Briscoe, '24E, general chair-
man, telephone 131.
One "skit" which will be used is
being written by a student and will
be completed within a few days, so
that rehearsals can be started on it.
Several dancers and singers are prac-
ticing and those in charge will soon
be able to decide definitely on two or
three acts. The acts already secured
are of a high calibre and those added
will have to be of a high standard
even if it is necessary to put on a
shorter program.
Show Educational Film Today
Scenes from Yellowstone National
Park, together with films entitled
"Across the Great Lakes" and "Home
Making in Canada" will be shown in
the series of educational motion pic-

PETRO ONLY MEMBER (
YEAR'S TEAM TO I
INELIGIBLE
YOST OPTIMISTIC C
NEXTYEAR'S PRO
Vacant Line Positions Will
est for Coaching Sta
to Fill
Coach Fielding lIT Yost st
terday that there will be.,
member of the Varsity footb
unable to play next fall be
ineligibility. Charles Pet
played the guard position in
was also a member of the
1920 has been declared inel
the school authorities Pk
the most promising candiat
t e places formerly occu
Duke Dunne and Hugh Wils
graduated in June.

Baseing his claim on his personal
observations obtained during his year's
tour of the world, Prof. William H.
Hobbs, head of the geology department
of the University, in reply to the ques-
tion, "Who won the war" replied "Ger-
many."
It was at the meeting of the Rotary
club here yesterday noon that Profes-
sor Hobbs gave= the reasons for this
statement.
German Trade Prospers
"Outside of the United States," he
'declared "industry and the carrying
trade have been gravitating into the
hands of Germany, which is note sup-
plied with a great merchant fleet con-
structed since the armistice. Germany
today is a beehive of industry with her
plants working night and day and
with contracts made on the most fav-
orable terms piling up faster than they
can be filled. Largely exempt from
the labor troubles which have vexed
hex, rivals, and with, the depreciated
mark favoring etxernal as opposed to
internal contracts the work goes on in
Germany at a' phenomenal pace. Only
recently this rush has been sonewhat
halted because deliveries were bdkom-
ing so long delayed as to divert con-
tracts to the other countries, partic-
ularly the United States, where indus-,
tries are once more getting on their
feet.
Everybody Works
"In German.y the capitalist, the shop-
worker, and the farmer are all pros-
pering. It is chiefly the ien of the
middle class, particularly 'the salar-
ied officials who are feeling the pinch
due to the depreciation of currency.
"There is undoubtedly profit to be
deprived from trading with Germany,'
but this profit is unfavorably affected
by the depreciation of the mark, kept
down in part, by the reparation penal-
ties. It seems to matter little to t01
business man that France ad Bel-
gium are entitled to the reparations,
which can in any case only in part.
indemnify them for their terrible sac-
rifices made in defending themselves
from the invader, or even that without
them they may never recover.
"The prime consideration seems to
be that th'e reparations hurt business,
and so France is now taunted as the
militaristic nation of Europe which is
stirrin up the hatred of Germany
and wil bring about a future war of
,revenge-just as though that war of
revenge were not already as certain a
the rising.of the sun on the morrow."
Dean Cooley in East
Dean Mortimer E Cooley of the
collpge of Engineering and Architec-
ture has left the city for a several
weeks' stay in the East. Monday he
attended a committee meeting of the
Society for the Promotion of Engi-
neering Education in New York. To-
morrow he will attend a conference of
the procedure committee of the Fed-
P-ntia tc A merion V inPino io 4, , a,'.oi -

During the war, he continued, the
sodiers were taught to hate the peo-
ple against whom they were fighting.
In drill, particularly in bayonet drill,
the men were commanded to show
hatred in the fierce contortions of
facial expression. It is but a natural
conclusion"based on a simple psycho-
logical principle that when the war
was over this' hatred should contin-
ue. Hatred in the one concept of
hating the enemy spread to other
phases of the emotion and its ex-
pression. -
Bigotry Preeminent.
Dr. Slonimsky took me further back
from the present war intd social evo-
lution and, our biological history.
"Man is a gregarious animal," he
said. "Such animals despise those
who do not conform to tf2eir group.
If he has a different religion, a aiffer-
ent ethic, he is ostracised.
"So it was with the Jew. He wasP
washed ashore in the wave of immi-
gration," continued Dr. Slonimsky.,
He was not accented, he was not as-
similated.- He had Different views
from.the group.
We then talked of how the world
was honeycombcd with strikes, wars,;
discords prejud; 4a narrow-minded-
ness and bigotry; irtdeed the wholel
conditiqn seemed an exceedingly dis-
mal outlook for the world. I asked
Dr. Slonimsky to v:hat or to whom1
he looked for hope. "To the Ameri-
can people - 'that old stock - the
men such as you'see in the Michigan
farmer and the Nebraska farmer,
sturdy honest types," he r-eplied. "But
even these are fast disapr earing," he
added.
The keynote of our conversation,
the dominant tone of Dr. Slonimsky's
convictions in last night's interview
was that liberal institutions will per-
ish if war is to continue, and that the
unity of mankind is the essential fun-
damental principle of the prophetic
religion.
PROF. CASE LEAVES
ON RESEARCH TOUR
Prof. E. C. Case, of the historical
geology and paleontology department,
will leave New "York, July 19, for
Europe, it was learned yesterday.
Professor Case has ,a year's leave of
ab'sence and will spend that period
in visiting Englaid, Europe, South
Africa and Australia in an effort to
find out the relation between the .rocks,
of the permian age of geological time
on the different continents.
He desires to reconstruct the geo-.

Line Is Problem
These two guards and a 1
sition will be the hardest
and his assistants, Little,
to fill, for 'there remains' lit
rial to choose from. Petro
den and Swan were. regard
most likely candidates for g
with the ineligibility of
coaches will hate to conti
search, for more than tv
guards %re necessary to a
present day football. Trac
and Garfield are' others whc
velop and Coach Mather proi
he has several men, from la
freshman squad who - will
fight for berths. Of these
Voort, the big guard foin
Lansing high school, looks
Blahnick and Slaughter
vouched for by the freshma
Muirhead will again be a reg
kle. Although light for this
he more than makes up for
and strength, and during
mer he hopes to' take on wel
of the above men will bes'
take the other position and
eapable substitites must 1
oped as well.
SBackfield Miterial Plen
'here will be two sets of
backfields in the Copferen
to go in next fall. The m
not only plentiful but the q
high, as there are six vete:
have l1l boen tried out a
proven their ability in *ol
with the best in the Confe
quarterback there are three
be hard to best. Ted Banks,
a bad knee last fall, has hi
good shape again and ther
Uteritz and 'Knode. Knode
at half last fall and Yost
cide to let him play there a
fall.
Cappon and Kipke are th
for the halfback positions.,
pare favorably with anything
Ferry field since Maulbech.
hindered during last season
shoulder and 'went into t
games with several rolls 01
wrapped around hini. Capp
has played end, tackle, and
always wanted to play in
field and when he got a (
proved so good that Yost
shift him back even though
short of tackles. Dunleavy
and Conley will fight it out
substitute positions.
At fullback Roby and Gu:
probably alternate. Roby,
not a favorite of Yost's, w
when the others were hur
proved one of the sensatio
year . His ability to shift
'out holes in the line were

graphical environment
animals lived at that

der

the 11

in

L {?

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan