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July 07, 1922 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-07-07

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THE WEATHER
UNSETTLED; PROBABLY
RAIN TODAYa

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XIII. No. 13 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 1922 PRICE FIVE CENTS

WAY TO NATIONA
RET SEMI-FNALS
FORMER VARSITY CAPTAIN AND
COACH WILL FACE TILDEN
TODAY
WINS FIRST TOURNEY
MATCHES WITH EASE
Aichigai Sear Expected to Give
National Champion Stiff
Opposition
Indianapolis, July 6.-Walter Wes-
brook, former Varsity captain and
last year coach of the Michigan ten-
nis team, today won the right to
meet William Tilden, second, of Phil-
adelphia, world tennis champion, in
the semi-final matches of the twelfth
national senior clay court tennis
championship singles as a result of
elimination matches at the Woodstock
Country club. _
Meets Tilden Today
- Wesbrook will' meet the great Til-
den Friday, when it is expected a bat-
tle royal for the victory will ensue.
The other semi-final match will be
played off Saturday, when Zenvo Shi-
nizu, Japanese Davis cup player, will
meet' Charles Garland,_ junior, of
Pittsbarg.
Tilden defeated Ray Brown of St.
Louis 6-4, 6-2. Wesbrook humbled
his oponent, Arthur Hubbell of Chi-
cago, 6-3, 6-4, the Michigan represen-
tative always holding the upper hand
and playing the best games of his en-
tire net career.
Shinizu. was victor over Theodore
Drewes, St. Louis, 6-1, 6-0, while
Garland defeated Fritz Bastian of. In-
dianapolis, 6-0, 6-4.
Playing in Good Form
Wesbrook has been playing 'n fine
form throughout the past. year, and
has shown up especially well during
the present ' championship tourna-
ment. Followers of the racquet sport
feel confident that the Michigan ace
will perform well against the cham-
pion, who will furnish Wesbrook the
greatest opponent he has ever faced
on a tennis court.
"WINTER'S TALE"
~ IS FIRST RECITAL
Scenes from "The Winter's Tale"
will be the first of the public entertain-
ments to be given by the public
speaking department during July and
August. "The Winter's Tale," given
by Prof. C. D. Wilner's class, will be
held in Sarah Caswell Angell hall on
the evening of July 24.
Later in the Summer session scenes
from another Shakesperian play will
conclude the work of this class.
"The Rivals" is the play which has
been selected by Prof. Hollister as the
drama to be.,produced by the class in
Play production on Aug. 21. A public
performance of "The Melting Pot" is
also contemplated but a suittble date
has not yet been decided upon.
Classes in Interpretive reading are
making preparations for several en-
tertainments, the dates of which have
not been set.
It is probable that most of the plays
will be given in the auditorium of
University Hall which has recently
been equipped with,all necessary stag-

ing materials.
No public debates will be held dur-
ing the summer months.;
NEVA LOVEWELL OUTLINES
WORK OF WOMEN'S LEAGUE
Neva M. Lovewell, '22, chairman of
the Undedgraduate fund fof the Wom-
en's- league, spoke last night before
the residents of Betsy Barbour hou'se
on the new women's building, the
work which has been done for it dur-
ing the past year and the work which
is being planned for the ebuilding dur-
ing the coming year.
She stressed the needs of the or-
ganization, urging the co-operation of
all women students. Opportunity for
membership in the womein's building
will be afforded before the close' of

WHEELER, RHEAD
TO GIVE CONCERT
Mr. William Wheeler and Mrs.
George B. Rhead will be heard in a
program of songs and piano solos at
the next complimentary recital, in the
series of concerts given by the School
of Music, at 8 o'clock, Wednesday eve-
ning, July 12, in Hill auditorium.
The concert to be given by these
two favorites promises to be a bril-
liant one with their previous offer-
ings as indications. The program
which they will give Will be announced
later.
MALLORY SPEAKS
ON CHILD ARIST
Points Out That Gifted Boys and Girls'
Are Not Abnormal, But Possess
Vitality
MOZART, MARJORIE FLEMING,
WERE YOUTHFUL PRODIGIESc
Discussing the child artist of thea
past and present, Prof. H. S. Mallory
of the rhetoric department spoke be-.
fore a representative audience yes-..
terday in Natural Science auditorium
on "The Child Artist." Professor Mal-t
lory first spoke of the boy Romana
Dazzi, the Italian artist whose worksf
have been exhibited here, and the Ital-
ian girl, Pamelabianco, now living in_
the United States whose work were
shown several years ago.
Children Not Abnormal
Professor Mallory paid partiular at-
tention to the boys who have written
stories and the girls who have writ-
ten verse. He pointed out that these
boys and girls are not abnormal and
precocious, but that they merely ar
children with plenty of vivacity and
enthusiasm that sought some kind of
expression. In these particular cases,
the self-expression simply ran in the
line or medium which was most natur-
al to the child.
Professor Mallory also indicated the
fact that thre must have been many
child artists in the past. The reason,
he said, that they were not well known
in such numbers and that we do not
know' of many of those in other ages,
is that there was little communication
and records were incomplete. He cit-
ed Mozart, who produced an oratorio
when he was ten and a light opera
about the age of 12. Marjorie Flem-
ing, who lived from 1803-1810, was
well known through her friendship
with Sir Walter Scott. In her sixth
year she kept a journal in which she
wrote down moral maxims, accounts
of personal experiences, which im-
pressed her, and interesting things
that other people said. Her literary
career ended by the writing of a 200)
line epic on the life of Mary, Queen
of the Scots. She is recorded as a
healthy, happy, average child, showing
few signs of an infant prodigy.
- Names Artists of Today
Touching on the child artists of our
own time, Professor Mallory spoke of
Hilda Conkling who in 1919 published
some poems written before she was
ten. This work was really poetry, he
said. It was the unconscious and
simple work of a child. It attracted
the attention of many of the foremost
critics, notably Louis Untermeyer,
Prof. Mallory classed her as an ex-
ception in whom there is some evid-
ence that she is going to be great
when she reaches maturity.
He said that few of the child art-

ists Tare really great when they grow
up. Through diversified interests their
attention is many times turned into
other lines of expression. An ex-
ample of this fact is Arvia MacKaye,
daughter of Percy MacKaye, who
wrote the "Hermit Thrush." Her spe-
cial interest has later turned to sculp-
ture, but now she gives her particular
attention to social problems.
Many Children Write
Of the most recent examples of child
artists is the boy Horace Wade, who
wrote a -30,000 word adventure story
which was published in 1920. Wade
is classified as a normal boy, but he
possessed the power of working the
thing through. Many of the children
of today start works of good merit,
but they do not carry their work
through to a conclusion.

TENNIS PLAYERS
MUST GET PERMITS
Increasing numbers of students are
taking advantage of the tennis courts
at Ferry field, which have been open
for the past week. A charge of $1.50
is made for a season permit, which
may be procured either at the Ath-
letic association rooms in the Press
building or from the attendant at
Ferry field. The courts are open from
8:45 a. m. to 6 p. m. on Saturdays,
and from 1:45 to 6 o'clock in the
afternoons the rest of the week ex-
cept on Sundays, when they are
closed all day.
MAY CLOSEFIELD
IHOUSE 'BID SOON

MICHIGAN'S NEW FIELD HOUSE, ON WHICH BIDS FOR CONTRACTS
ARE NOW BEING RECEIVED. THE NEW BUILDING WILL PRO-
VIDE ACCOMMODATIONS FOR ALL THE SPORTS NOW INCLUDED
IN THE UNIVERSITY'S ATHLETIC PROGRAM, AND WILL ALSO
HAVE A SEATING CAPACITY OF 12,500.
SCORES ARE TRAPPED IN NEW YORK
SUBWAY WHEN FUMES FILL TUNNEL

Officials

Believe .Contract
Accepted Next
Week

.wi .Bel

New York, July 6.-Trapped in a'
dark subway tunnel, 75 feet below the
street and reeking with gas fumes
and smoke, nearly 500 men, women
and children passengers of the East
side train Interborough Rapid Tran-
sit were converted into a_ frenzied,
shrieking mob, almost a third of
these people were overcome before
they could fight their way to safety.
Three probably will die. Police of-
ficials said it was a miracle that they
were not trampled to death, as the

only exit is a narrow little spiral
stairway. This was jammed with
fugitives from the train below. A lit-
tle fire extinguisher, whose contents
were charged on a tiny blaze in a
motorman's power box, was held re-
sponsible for the clouds of poisonous
smoke sent whirling through the tun-
nel.
More than three score of those
overcome were in such serious con-
dition as to require hospital treat-
ment.

ALL. SPORTS PROVIDED FOR

PROF. HOBBS RETURNS
jFROM TOUR OF VORLO

FOURTH TRIP TO COVER
BELLE 'ISLE~. WINDSOR

TO

VISITED 25
LANDS
Twenty-five
visited in one

COUNTRIES AND
DURING YEAR'S.
TRIP

IS-.

PRIMARY PURPOSE OF TRIP I$
FURNISH OUTING FOR
STUDENTS

countries and islands
year is the fecord made

by Prof. W. H. Hobbs, head of the
geology department of the University,
who has just returned from a tour
which commence4 when he sailed
from San Francisco on June 29, 1921.
Professor Hobbs made the tour for
the purpose of collecting information
whiclh would aid in the study of the
origin and growth of mountains.
Among the countries which he visited
are the Federated Malay States, Hin-
dustan, Egypt. Yap, Germany, Hol-
land, Guadalupe, Venezuela, Cuba and
the Canal zone.
Whenthe American Geological so-
ciery meets in Ann Arbor next De-
cember, Professor Hobbs will deliv-
er an address before members of that:
organization in which he will give a
review of the work he has accom-
plished during his year's absence from
the University. The subject of his
address will be "Island Arcs of the
Pacific.".
Open Air Drama
To 21e Presented
Under the trees between the Li-
brary, Tappan hall, and South Wing,
the Shakespearian playhouse com-
pany of New York City will give per-
formancess this summer from Aug. 3
to 5.
"Galsworthy's Pigeon," "The Ad-
mirable Creighton," by James M. Bar-
rie, and Shakespeare's "Taming of the
Shrew" and "Twelfth Night" will be
given. No scenery but the natural
stage will be used.
The stage will be laid out between
two huge oaks, facing the benches
which will be placed to accommodate
from 1,500 to 2,000 people. The whole
thing will be enclosed with burlap
walls. The only disadvantage will be
the level ground which does not lend
itself to this use as well as if it were
sloping. The coming to Ann Arbor of
the Playhouse company brings back
something which has not happened
for six years when the Ben Greet
players were here. Before 1916 these
players were a regular feature of the
University Summer sesson.,

Belle Isle and Windsor are the twoF
points to be visited Wednesday, July
12, by the Summer session students
on the fourth excursion. Unlike the
previous trips, this will be largely,
a pleasure trip.
All important parts of Belle Isle,
Detroit playground park, will be vis-
ited. This includes tb* outdoor zoo,1
the aquarium, the casino, the botani-
cal gardens, the wooded drives and
the typical scenes of the Detroit
river.
To See New Bridge
In addition, the partly constructed
Detroit to Canada bridge will be ob-
served from the shore, with opportu-
nity for understanding how the gi-
gantic passageway is actually put up.
Picnic grounds for the party will ba
available, and for those who do not'
bring their lunch, meals can be ob-
tained at the Casino.
Preceding the boat ride from the
lower Woodward to Belle Isle, a brief
visit to Windsor will be taken on the
Ferry. This will allow the writing of
post cards, mailed with 'Canadian
stamps and for a short walk on Ca-
nadian soil. All foreign students will
facilitate arrangements for taking the
passage to Windsor by bringing their1
passports.
Outing to Furnish Pleasure
Carlton Wells, director of excur-
sions, in commenting on the excur-
sion, said, "The primary purpose of
this trip is to furnish an outing and
pleasant sight-seeing. We ought to
(Continued on Page Four)
LOCAL HIGH SCHOOL HAS 834
ENROLLED IN SUMER COURSES
Ann Arbor high school, with an en-
rollment of 334 students has the high-
est attendance of any summer session
in the history of the school. Many of
the pupils in school this summer are
the children of University faculty
who will not be going away on their
vacations until the close of the Uni-
versity Summer session and who will
not return until after the opening of
the Ann Arbor high schools in the
fall. By taking courses now they
will be able to' keep up with their
classes even though handicapped by
a late start.
E In addition to the courses given
throughout ,the year, instruction is
being given in music by students at-
tending the summer term in the Uni-
versity School of Music.

IN NEW ATHLETIC BUILDINGt
Bids are now being received forv
contracts for the construction of thea
University's proposed new athletice
field house to be constructed on Ferryh
field. It is expected by Athletic as-~
sociation officials that a definite con-e
tract will be accepted before the end -
of next week.
Provisions for indoor football and
baseball, sevieral basketball courtse
an eighth-mile track, and a 75 yardo
straightaway track will be among theh
building's facilities. Together withf
locker and shower facilities for 4,200,v
these will provide for the proper hand-p
ling of all indoor Varsity and fresh-h
man indoor athletics, allowing Water-
man gymnasium facilities to be de-t
voted entirely to class work and intra- s
mural activities. The main activityf
room will be 160 by 300 feet. in size,t
clear of dbstruction up to a height ofd
63 feet.
The structure's seating capacity of
12,5p0 will be by far the largest of
any indoor seating, capacity in or
about Ann Arbor. Hill auditorum's I
three floors seat 4,480 people.
Patton gymnasium, Evanston, has
been the only building of the sort in
the Conference with facilities sufficient
to entertain the Big Ten indoor track
meets. These meets have also beent
held in Illinois armory, Urbana. Mich-v
igan will now be in a position to hold,
indoor track meets of any size.
b
'EXPECT 2500 DEEGTESr
R I
AT _ANNUAL CONERENCE-
Of LEGION HERE, SdEPT. 5t
Ann Arbor will be host to between
2,000 and 2,500 delegates to the an-
nual convention of the American Le-
gion, which will be held in this city
Sept. 5 and 6.
"Practically the whole Universitya
has been thrown wide open to the
Legion," said Prof. F. N. Menefee, ofy
the Engineering school, who has
charge of the arrangements for the
convention. The women's auxiliaryr
will be housed in Martha Cook and
Adelia Cheever house, while accom-
modations for the men delegates have
been offered by the Acacia, Deltas
Kappa Epsildn, Beta Theta Pi, and.'
Delta Theta Phi fraternities. Orie,
hundred members of the Women's
Housing league will accept paid
guests.
Among the spealers of the occasion
will be Judge Kenesaw M. Landis.
President Marion L. Burton, has been
invited to speak, but has not definite-
ly accepted the invitation.
Registration of delegates will take
place on the morning of Sept. 5 at
the Michigan Union. At 6 o'clock- the
Alumnae Council of the Alumni Asso-
ciation of the University will hold a
banquet for delegates in Barbour
gymnasium. Prof. J. A. C. Hildner
of the German department has charge
of the entertainment for the eve-
ning. Following the banquet a dance
will be given at the Union.
Hill auditorium will be opened for
the convention Sept. 6, when formal
business will be taken up, and offi-
cers elected for the ensuing year.

iTR1KE EXTNSION,
AGAIN PREVENTED
BY LAWOR BOARID
PrIREATENED WALKOUT OF 12,500
SIGNAL MEN AWAITS-VON-
1ERENCE
ROAD HEADS SEE HOPE
OF RECALLING SHOPMEN
rewell, Reiterates Statements That
Strikers Will Consider Any
Peace Poposal
(By Associated Press)
Chicago, July 6.-A threatened ex-.
tension of the strike of railway shop-
rnen to include 12,000 signal men was
prevented today by members of the
United States railroad labor board,
when D. W. Helt, head of the broth-
erhood of railway signal men, after
taking a strike vote promised to main-
tain the status quo pending a further
conference.
It was the second time that inter-
vention of board members has averted
an extension of the walkout, a threat-
ened strike of maintenance of way men
having been prevented Tuesday
through the efforts of Chairman Hoop-
r and W. L. McNemimen, labor mem-
ber of the board.
Hoipe for Quick Settlement
Meanwhile, railway officials express-
ed strong hope of a quick settlement
of the shop men strike B. M. Jewell,
head of the shop men, today reiterated
former statements that the shop men
were willing to consider a settlement
proposition submitted by any author-
ized body.
The situation is improving so far as
the strike is concerned, Mr. Jewell
said, asserting that he had received
favorable reports from "what few men
that did remain at work last Satur-
day and Monday, who joined the walk-
out later."
JOURNAISM DEPATMENT^
TO HAVE NEW COURSE
Courses in journalism this fall will
total 13, aggregating 38 hours' credit.
with the addition of a new course in
magazine writing, which will be taught
by Donal Hamilton Haines. This will
be a year course, with six hours' credit.
Several important changes lcave been
made concerning sequence of courses.
Elements of jouialism, Course 31,
will be a prerequisite for all courses
in editorial writing. Only seniors will
be allowed to elect courses in adver-
tisement and editorial writing. No per-
son with a grade -lower than C may
continue the course in -journalism,
without 'special permission. "The ob-
ject of this," Professor Brumm says,
"is to discourage those ,who are tak-
ing jorunalism merely as practice for
writing. We wish to encourage journ-
alism as a profession."
The personnel of the department will
be increased to four by the addition of
an assistant instructor in advertising.
The Students' Press club will be
materially strengthened this fal. F.
W. LaRouche, president of the club, is
corresponding with advertising and
newspapermen, in an effort to engage
speakers for the li-weekly luncheons
which the club will give. This asso-
ciation will aid in. cunducting the
fourth annual con~ntion of the Uni-

versity Press' Club of Michigan, Oct.
26, 27,''and 28.
GUN AND BLADE TO. HOLD
DANCE IN BARBOUR GYM
Tickets for the dance to be given
in Barbour gymnasium Saturday
night by the Gun and Blade club, a
campus~ organization, may be obtain-
ed at Fisher's drug store and at all
the campus book stores at 75 cents
per ticket.
The chaperones for the evening will
be Dr. Fred B. Wahr and Mrs. WahrI
Dr. James F. Breakey and Mrs. Break-
ey, and Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Bryce.
Punch will be served by the woman's
auxiliary of the Gun and Blade club.
Music will be furnished by Ken-
nedy's Society Dance orchestra.

nt

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