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June 25, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-06-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE SUl

ER MICHIGAN DAILY

.,
m.

T4l ixunumrr
FFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER SESSION OF
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Summer-
ssion by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEUIMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for re-
iblication of all news disptches credited to it or otherwise
edited in this paper and the local news published therein..
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
ass matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $1.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signa-
:re nlot necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of faith,
id notices of events will be published in The, Summer Daily at the
scretion of the Editor, if left at, or mailed to The Summer Daily
lice. Unsigned communica-tions will receive no consideration. No
anuscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Summer Daily does not necessarily endorse the senti-
ents expressed in the communicatonis.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
:ANAGING EDITOR ..............LE0 J. HERSHDORFER
ity Editor.................................James B. Young
ight Editors-
Howard A. Donahue Julian t. Mack
porting Editor... ......Jack D. Briscoe
omen's Editor . .. .......................Dorothy Bennetts
ditorials. ............Herbert S. Case
umor Editor. . .............. ........Donald Coney
iteraryEdit r...-. -...G.. - - . D. Eaton
Assistants'

The coal strike has already reached a dangerous
"age, and unless checked immediately there is r:
filling how far the men may go to accomplish
,heir aims. The matter has come to such a serico
pass that it is for the federal government, and
no subordinate agency to put an immediate stns,
,to the Herrin law violations. Not only that to'
and its immediate vicinity is concerned now, but th,
entire nation, the people of the United States, de-
mand the protection of the government. This is nO
time for mincing words or official red tape - 'as -
ington must act, and act quickly.
THE LECTURE PROGRAM
The lectures which are being offered this sum-
mer, as outlined in the program recently an-
nounced, affords students of the Summer session
the opportunity of hearing addresses and illus-
trated talks by men who are recognized as prom-
inent authorities in their respective fields. Coach
Yost on the relation of athletics to college life, Pro-
fessor Dickinson on the significance of the Wash-
ington Conference, Professor White on the Muscl
Shoals project -these are but a few of ,the inter,
esting subjects which will form part of the exten-
sive program this summer.
The names of the men who are to deliver the lec-
tures should alone be sufficient reason to attract
suminer students, while the subjects are of su -
cient educational value to merit strong Sup-r
Then; talks are as much and as important a 1:. .
the Summer session as the courses of inst 'x
which are offered.
If it is as cold in the class rooms this summer as
it was durinfg the past winter, Palm Beach will have
to take second place to us.
Cheero ! only eight weeks and it will be all over.
.a N............sa.....................a...............,.........
THE FRYING PAN
-a flash in the Pan."
NYNS...*tb .R *.*.N...N.....I.* ab*... ....... .. a...... 4..............

Text Books upplies for
all h,."g$

f1f'P C ....

v - -1

L~othi Stores

Don a cres

GRAHAM'S

I1

11

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. niri

Rent'A II

'S'umme'r Students-

Ty pe writer
Hamilton Business
College
State and William Streets

Secure your su ies at

I

ST U D ENTS SU PPLY STORE
1111 South University Avenue

11

Nate

rials for All Colleges

W. B. Butler

Leona 'Horwitz

BUSINESS STAFF
TelephO ne 960
INESS MANAGE -R...........HEROLD C. HUNT.
rtising.............................Townsend H. Wolfe
ication...........................George W. Rockwood
vnts..... . ....... Laurence H. Ravrot
lation.. .............. ..Edward F. Conlin

°11nlllln lllltllti ltltn lllt;X11611Fl nllttn il[In 11t rtn illl t111llln m nilf iNll~li lM i 111111 l n lt
Prepare for the Summer Vacation. GetA
RTED STAI VAPOR OIL STYE
,r
And be.comfortable when you are doing your cooking. 'Cheap fuel.
. One gallon Kerosene oil lasts one hour. Priced from $27 to $78.
Refrigerators - - Refrigrators
The RANNEY Line beats them all as to quality and price. r
su
ELECTRIC FANS will keep you cool and comfortable. See Ours.
Fishing Tackle - - Fishing Tackle
The fish nearly jump into your boat to get our bait. Look them over.
PRICES RIGHT SERVICE PROMPT
Larned Hardware Comnpany
(Successors to M. D. Larned)
THE UP-TO-D TE' HAR!4 WA RE
PHONE 1610 310 SOUTH STATE STREET
II I111111IImIIII m m11161111111111111111ll I 1111 1111011111II i nIIQX11111111111 [Ii ltt n lll E 11111Ii11 timu l 1 m I i fi ll I

Assistants
B. Clark Gibson

>ldsmith

Katherine E. Styer

SUNDAY, JUNE 25, 1922
THE SUMMER SESSION GROWS
[n recent years there has been coming more and
re into prominence the realization of the value
attending the summer courses offered by the
ger universities in the country. Students who
ve been forced to leave before their regular
irses were completed utilize the summer school
regain lost credits. School teachers, principals
d supervisors especially are coming to appreciate
great opportunities which are offered them in
e Summer session. For them the summer courses
Id forth the advantage of securing degrees byat-
tdance at several extra sessions, the majority of
iversities today recognizing in full all credit
ned during the summer. These are but a few of
benefits: the others are too numerous to enu-
rate, but none the less deserving of considera-
Here at Michigan the development of the Sum-
r session has been one of phenomenal growth. In
rmer years but 100 subjects or so were taught
ring the summer, with but little variety and
>ice; this year 475 distinct courses of instruction
IA be offered.. This alone is a sign indicative o.
Sincrasing popularity of the Sunmer session at
University. It is a noteworthy fact, too, that of
these branches of education on this year's pro-
um, 352 have been so designed as to be of esp'
1 benefit to school teaqhers and superintendents.
The Summer session is growing, of that there can
no doubt. It is an opportunity well worth g"
- and he who does so, 'steals a march on the
ier fellow, laggard who prefers to spend his
mnmers in some idle pursuit, lounging at a pleas-~
e resort or braving the waves at an ocean beac.
LIBERTY AND THE UNION
Ihat laboring men have the right to organize for
nr own mutual protection, so that they may best
-ve their own interests in the most rational man-
r possible, is an admitted fact.. Labor and capi-
for a long time were at odds, and it was the 01
ization of the labor unions which aided in sev
ug, to some extent, the bonds of disagreement
ween the two. But when labor, overstepping the
its which have been set for it, attempts to e
ce its demands by ruthless methods, such as have
ri put into practice at Herrir, Illinois, within the
t few days of the coal miners' strike, it is bound
incur ,the displeasure of even its most radical
rpathizers.
!1 strike, if carried ouf peacefully, is legal, and
tinms the best means of attaining a desired end.
e extent to which the union miners have gone hi
strike, however, is not only illegal but what i
re serious, inhuman. Men who were brought i
carry on the work while the organized miner
e out, were slaughtered in cold blood by a jeer-
uncontrollable mob. To line up a group of men,
>rder them to run and then to shoot them be-
d their backs, and to scoff at their dead bodies
H a "they got just what they deserved" attitude
he miners did, seems more the act of a horde of
barians rather than the deed of a supposedly

The literary. Number
Selections from Recent Books
Chunks of the Freckled East. By Carl
Boney and Liverblight.
Anguish

.Pit tsburg.

And just today
We saw a man we owe money to -
Damn him !
Two weeks ago he went
Down State street with a bag
And we thought he had shot the moon
For the summer.
Now we find he's back for
Summer school.
God, what a hunted existence we lead!
The feautiful and the Damaged. By F. Greatscott
Fitzgerald. Published by Charles Skidner's
Wife and Child.
--iere we were set upop and beaten with clubs.
"Murder!" cried Ardley impulsively. A psychic
something told me he was wrong. "You are col-
lege students, are, you not?" said I, addressing our
assailants. 'We are," returned they, civilly. "It is
as I thought," thrilled I ,turning to my companion.
"This is not murder at all, but a boyish prank,
merely." Ardley was covered with confusion, and
vowed he should never forgive 'himself, although
the students,, with rare good breeding, affected to
make light of it.
Childrens' W. C. T. U. of History. By Hendrick
Willem+ VanBloon. Alfred A. Knu f.
("Bourgeois Books".)
-And the general said to the .sturdy patrioteers,
"Boys," he said, "boys, dont' fire until you see the
whites .of ,their eyes !"
Wasnt' it fortunat( that the Britishers didn't
charge with their eyes shut !
-Thomas Jefferson sat up far into the night
writing the Declaration of Independence. Then he
went home and sneaked upstairs in his stocking
feet.
The Sport Writer's Summer Cold
There is many a poet lost in the newspaper
game, and many a 6o HP arc lamp of genius is
hidden beneath a bushel of copy paper. But it
breaks out, it breaks out. This is what the Asso-
ciated Press sport man hands out on the Yale-Har-
vard regatta.
"Tradition that has come down through the years'
will slip*into the old Thames tomorrow alongside
the crews of Yale and Harvard, the bitterest of
gentle foes, as they lift their shells into the stream
whose ripples will hum to the Atlantic tomorrow
night, the praise of the victor in the fifty-fifty inter-
'varsity regatta championship of the eight-oared
crews."
The Literary Anecdote
Young lady to library assistant: Have you got
the Great Hunger?
"Gawd, girl, I ain't et since morning !"

Selecting Your
Footwear from
this Month-End
Shoe Sale 'Means
a Great Saving

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to You

White Oxfords

$4.45

For summer wear white oxfords are cool and
comfortable. We are showing models made in
styles that are modish enough for any occa-
sion. They have flat heels and are fashioned
of an excellent quality of reignskin cloth. They
will look well with sports attire, street frocks,
or light summery dresses. These oxfords reg-
ularly sell for $5.50 a pair and will be includ-
ed in this month end sale of shoes at $4.45
a pair.
Dorothy Dodd Oxfords
$5.95
Dorothy Dodd top grade reignskin cloth ox-
fords are quite the thing for dress wear all
summer. Their style and quality makes them
famous and the price 'makes them popular.
They will clean easily and be cool and com-
fortable all summer long. Regularly priced
$7.50 but included in this sale for $5.95 a pair.'

Black Pumps
$2.00
Our special black kid pump with turned sole
and military heel is .very suitable for house
and street wear. The heel is mediumly high,
just the right weight for comfort and style,
it is finished with a ribbon ornament and will
give long service. A pair of these pumps may
be worn with light summer dresses and with
dark suits. On sale at $2.00 a pair.

1

I

}
r

I

Sports Oxfords
$5.45
A pair of black and white sports oxfords will
complete the summer wardrobe. These ox-
fords are ultra-stylish with their black patent
leather trimmings. The best of reignskin cloth
has been used for them and they have flat
heels, a medium toe and a broad ankle strap
that gives them an, air of style. Regularly
priced $7.50 and on sale at $5.45 a pair.

Ij
L.

(Main Floor)

f

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