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June 25, 1922 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-06-25

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Al&r

kTHER

CONTINUED
WARM

Lit419

1 a i

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

XIII.No. 5

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, JUNE 25, 1922

PRICE FIVE CENTS

________________________ - I

8~l STUENT1S GET
IL-ASCHOLARSHIP
SEMESTER RECORD
NAMED ON ROLL OF HONOR
ENROLLED IN LITERARY'
COLLEGE
UMBER IS ONE LESS
THAN PREVIOUS TERM
ngineers Rave 18 on List; Juniors
and Freshmen Have Best
Representation
Fifty-eight studeits, 42 of whom are
iled in the literary college and is
z the engineering college, received
11-A grades for the entire work ot
ie past semester. This total of stu-
ants whose names are placed on the
>nor list is one less than that of
ie previous semester, when 35 lit
rary students and 24 engineering stu-
ents secured All-A records.
The following literary students re-
eived All-A grades: Amos C. An-
arson, '22; Eva Anderson, '22; W.
eland Anderson, '25; Augusta F. Av~
y, '25; Charlotte A. Blagdon, '25;
rances Bonner, '25; Jane E. Briggs,
5; Gail E. Densmore, '22; Frieda
lekhoff, '24; Frederic Donner, '23;
rancis Eyre, '22; Maxwell Fead,
5; Clifford Folz, '23; Myrna Fry,
2; Florence Fuller, '25; Walter Gab-
1, '25; Edna Groff, '22; Grace Hall,
5; Caroline Heinz, '23; Myrtle Holm-
3, '24; Norman Johnson, '25; Eugenia
.atz, '23; Howard Kaufman, '25; Mar-
aret Kraus, '23; Clara Lau, '25; John
eighly, '22; Dorothy Lippold, '24; D.
alph McClurg, '23; Gordop McCurdy.
4; Samuel Moore, Jr., '25; Edna
ash, '22; Evangeline, Parker, '22;
na Purdie., '23; Edward Ramsdell,
3; Lisle i Rose, '24; Harry Rosene,
pec.; Harold Scott, '22; M s. E.
ynne Spaulding, '23; Beatrice Tench,
3; Lois Waterman, '24; Miller Wil-
ains, 122; Emily Wires, '23.
Of this number the juniors and
reshmen are tied for honors, each
lass having 13 members on the list.
eniors come next with 9 and the
ophomores at the end with only 6
udents whi received All-A grades.
The following representation from
e engineering college received the
igBh.est grades: R. C. Ackerman; D.
. Apted, '24E; W. E. Bandemen,
2E; M. L. Baxter, '23E; G. E. Bosser-
et, '25E; H. W. Bousman, '24E; C. R.
rown, grad.; C. E. Claeys, '25E; W.
. Greiner, '25E; A. Levin, '23E; H. C.
ife, '22E; P. B. Pew, '23E; J. R. Pol-
amus, '24E; H, R. Schemm, '24E;
1. A. Whinery, '24E; E. R. Wolfert,
33\.
Dean Jordan To
Sail Tor Europe
Dean ltU)ra B. Jordan and Mr. Fred-
riek P. Jordan left Ann Arbor Wed
esday for Battle Creek, where they
ill visit with relatives and friends
rior to their sailing for Europe,
here they expect to spend the wint-
r On their way back fron Battle

reek they are planning to stop here
or two days as the guests of Dr.
nd Mrs. James F. Breakey. Mr. and
[rs. Jordan are expecting to sail for
taly on the Italian steamship 'Con-
isosso" on July 6. They will be in or'
round the vicinity of Genoa until
he first of November.
Mrs. Jordan has been the dean of
romen at the University for the past
0 years and has always acted as a
riend and supporter of the women
ere. She has been instrumental in
ettering the conditions of the wom-
n students in Ann Arbor, one of the
reatest services which she has rend-
red the University, it is said, being
he organization of league houses.
Mr. Jordan has been on the staff of
he University library for a long time.

PR A., ED#DENT WILL
IIILD RECEPI ION
President Marion L. Burton and
Mrs. Burton will hold a reception for
the students and faculties of the Sum-
mer session from 4 to 6 o'clock Wed-
nesday afternoon in Alumni Memorial
hall. This will be the first oppor-
tunity for the students to meet the
President and faculty of the Univer-
sity. The whole building will be used
for the reception and will be decorated
with flowers and branches from the
University botanical gardens.
This reception by the President has
been a customary affair but was of a
necessity omitted last year because of
the absence of President Burton and
Mrs. Burton from Ann Arbor. This
is practically the only chance that
will be afforded to the summer stu-
dents to meet the President and the
faculty as the Summer' session is
short.
TWELVE SUMMER
TOURS ANNOUNGED

Industrial Plants of Detroit
Jackson Included in Itiner-
ary-

and

NEW STUDENTS WILL MAKE
INSPECTION TRIP OF CITY
A series of 12 industrial and sight-
seeing trips in Ann Arbor, Jackson,
and Detroit has been arranged for
the resent ummer session. For the
first time In the history of the ses-
sions, a definite schedule of excur-
sions to neighboring cities has been
formulated, to furnish recreation and
extracurriculum educational exper-
iences to the students of the Univer-
sity,
Detroit will be visited 10 tImes, and
Ann Arbor and Jackson will each he
included for one special trip. Through
these supervised excursions the most
important industries, the most signi-
ficant municipal and civic enterpris-
es, and the points of greatest gener-
al interest will be visled.
To Tour Ann Arbor FirAt
The first week includes only the
Ann Arbor sightseeing gjud get-ac-.
quainted tour, especially arranged for
the newcomers who are strangers in
the city. Two trips each week will
follow, all being Into Detroit until
August 5. Among the points to be
visited, the cmoplete itinerary of
which is on the Summer session week-
ly bulletins, are the Ford plant on
July 5, the Burroughs Adding Machine
company on July 8, and a picnic to
Belle Isle the afternoon of July 12.
While the trips will be of interest
to any student wishing to see import-
ant phases of Michigan's great indus-
trial center, It is declared the varied
nature of the schedule will undoubt-
edly draw particularly from the teach-
ing, engineering, and business ad-
ministration student bodies.s
Wells in Chaige
Carlton Wells, director of the ex-
cursion, estimates the couse of each
trip to be not eceeding two dollars,
which includes one meal, carfare both
ways, and transportation to and from
the points visited. The party will have
special car accommodations on the
D. U. r., and for this reason, all stu-
dents expecting to take a particular
trip are requested to drop their names
in the University Summer session box,
room 8, University hall, not later than
6 o'clock of the evening preceding the
day the trip Is to be taken. All stu-
dents enrolled in the Summer session
are eligible to take these trips.
PART-TIME EMPLOYMENT FOR
WOMEN REPORTED SCARCE
Summer part-time employment for
women is scarce. This statement was
made yesterday afternoon by Miss
Helen C. Bishop, acting dean of wom-
en for the Summer session. Accord-
ing to Miss Bishop there is practic-
ally no demand for student help dur-
ing the summer, although there are
a few places where women may help
with the household duties or where
they may wait on table for their board.
Up until yesterday afternoon there
had been but one or two women stu-
dents who have asked for summer

RUTHVEN TO OPEN
SUMMER LECTURE
PROC RAM 'ONDA
TAKES "NATURAIST IN SOUTH
AMERICA" AS TOPIC OF
TALK
PROF. DICKINSON WILL
GIVE ADDRESS TUESDAY
Authority On International Law Will
Explain Facts of Disarmament
Conference
Prof. A. G. Ruthven, of the zoology
department and director of the Mus-
eum of oZology, willdeliver the first
lecture on the University's extensive
program of talks, addresses and illus-
trated lectures throughout the Sum-.
mer session, at 5 o'clock Monday in
Natural Science auditorium. Profes-
sor Ruthven has chosen as the sub-
ject fo rhis lecture, which will be il-
lustrated, "A Naturalist in South Am-
erica.,
To Lecture Tuesday
Prof. E. D. Dickinson, member of
the Law school faculty of the Univer-
sity and recognized as one of the
foremost figures on international law,
will speak on "Significant Results of
the Washington Coniference," at 5
o'clock Tu'sday in Natural Science
auditorium.
The second part of the complete
program, the first installment of
which was printed in Saturday's Sum-
mer Daily, follows:
Monday, July 10
5 p. m.-Irrigation in the United
States. (Illustrated). Prof. H. W.
King.
8 p. m.-Building and Beautifying the
Community, (Illustrated). Dr. R.
E. Hieronymus, of the University of
Illinois,
Tuesday, July 11
5 p. m.-The Ethics of the Prophetic
Religion. Dr. H. Slonimsky, of Cin-
cinnati.
8 p. m.-The Safety of Surgical Op-
erations. Dean Hugh Cabot.
Wednesday, July 12
1 p. m.-Excurslon No. four.-Wind-
sor, Ontario; Belle Isle, and the De-
troit River. Picnic to be heldi at
Belle Isle.
5 p. m.-The Prophetic Religion of a
Life-Idealism. Dr. H. Slonimsky.
8 p. m.-Concert-Faculty of the Un-
iversity School of Music. (Hill au-
ditorium).
Thursday, July 13
5 p. m.-The Permanent Significance
of the Messianic Ideal. Dr. H. Slon-
*imsky
8 p. m.-Educational motion pictures.
Friday, July 14
2:30 p. m.-Excurison No. flive-Niag-
ara Falls and vicinity. Under the
direction of Prof. '. D. Scott, via
Michigan Central railroad to Detroit.
5 p. m.-Experimental Demonstration
of the Properties of Liquid Air. H.
H. Sheldon.
8 p. m.-Recital-Shakespeare's "Tam-
ing of the Shrew." Assist, Prof.
Louis M. Eich. (Sarah Caswell
Angell hall),
Saturday, July 15
8 a. m.-Excursion No. six-Detroit
Creamery company and Detroit wat-
er works,
Monday, July 17
5 p. m.-The Beginning of Vagabond
Literature. Prof. J. H. Hanford.
Tuesday, July IS
5 p. m. - Water Supply of Ancient

Cities. (Illustrated). Prof. W. C.
Hoad.
8 p. m.-Important Facts About Can-
cer. Prof. Ruben Peterson.
Wednesday, July 19
11 a. m.-Excursion No. seven-Cass
Technical high school and Hotel Stat-
ler, Detroit. Trip ends at 5 p. m.
5 p. m.-Development of the French
Theater. (Illustrated). Dean John
R. Effinger.
8 p. m.-Concert-Faculty of the Uni-
versity School of Music. (Hill au-
ditorium.)

UNIVESITY GIVES
DEGREES TO 1835
Eighteen hundred and thirty-five
persons have been granted degrees
by the University from July 1, 1921 to
June 30, 1922 ,according to compila-
tion made by University officials this
week.
The number of degrees granted in
I the various departments is as fol-
lows: Bachelor of arts, 819; bachelor
of education, 54; bachelor of laws, 94;
bachelor of science, including all
branches, 416.
Doctor of dental surgery, 66; doctor
of medicine, 71; doctor of medicine
(homoeopathic), 9; doctor of philoso-
phy, 28; juris doctor, '22; master of
arts, 119; master of science, all
branches, 73; pharmaceutical chem-
ist, 18; certificate of embalming and
sanitary science, 5; teachers' diploma,
271; certificate in business aminis-
tration, 104; nurses diploma, 53.
Honorary degrees granted included:
Master of engineering, 1; master of
arts, 3; doctor of letters, 1; doctor
of science, 1; master of laws, 1: doc-
tor of laws, 3.
STRIKE SITUATION
State Military Commission 1s- es
Recommendation Not to Use
Armed Force

EARLY FIGURES 'FOR REGIlSTRATIOUN'
REACH 1441;. OFFICIALS CONFIDENT
Of RECORD SUMMER ENROLLMENT

WHAT'S GOING ON
The Summer Daily will run a
program of events, meetings,
etc., day by day, throughout the
Summer session. Notices of
meetings and ther events should
in The Summer Daily office be-
fore 8 o'clock of the night pre-
ceding the events.
EXPECT.MANY FgAMOUS
CONCERT SOLOISTS TO
APPEARH HERE IN FLLE
Many brilliant musical nupbers
will be provided in Hill auditorium
next year under the auspices of the
University Musical society in the two
series of concerts which have ordin-
arily been scheduled-the Choral Un-
ion and May Festival series and the
Extra Concert series. Complete an-
nouncement regarding the attractions
to appear in both series will be made

AiNNOUNCEMENT RECEIVED
WITH GENERAL APPR

IVAL Jin the near future.

(By Associated Press)
Herrin, Ills., June 24.-With the de-
narture of Governor Small's special
military commission, headed by Maj-
or-General Milton J. Foreman, and
the announcement of its recommen-
dation that no troops be sent into
Williamson county at the present
time, and that those national guard
units which already have been mobil-
ized and held in readiness be order-
ed home, the situation in the coal
;ilds was easier tonight.
Residents of the county, miners,
mine union officials, business men
,lnost without exception said they
believed the recommendation a good
one and hoped it would be followed.
General Foreman said that he be-
lieved that the disturbed conditions
had been tentatively relieved .and
that it would not recur unless there
was an attempt to mine coal, and he
did not believe this would be done.
The general and members of the
military commission declined to say
whether they believe civil authorities
of thecounty had done their duty in
attempting to cope with the disturbed
condition which led to the killing
Thursday.
Tomorrows fnquest was expected
to end for at least the time being the
official investigation of local authori-
ties into the deaths of the non-union
shovel miners and mine guards.
"Persons unknown, the indications
are, will be offleially accountable for
the deaths, and it appears highly
improbable that the- identity of those
responsible will ever be made
known.
6,879 STUDENTS OF
STATE HERE IN '21
Michigan leads in the states of the
the Union represented at the Univer-
sity last year with a total enrollment
of state students placed at 6,879. This
is by far the largest number of stu-
dents from this state which has been
in attendance at the University.
Ohio, New York, Illinois and In-
diana are the four states which fol-
low, respectively, in representation at
Michigan.
Of the foreign countries. China
leads with 91. Ontario has 85, with
South Africa, Japan, and India follow-
ing in order. These figures, togeth-
er with complete announcements of
courses to be offered in 1922-1923, are
contained in the New University cata-
logue concerning the new depart-
ments which have recently been edd-

Appearance of the following bril-
liant attractions are assured, how-
ever:
Mary Garden IDcludedE
Mary Garden, soprano, perhaps one
of the best known operatic stars the
country has ever known. The ex-
act date of! her appearance has not
yet been determined but she will un-
doubtedly open the series early in Oc-
tober. Later in the month Mischa El-1
man, the distinguished violin virtuoso,
will appear in recital. In Novemebr
Lucien Muratore, the famous tenor
of the Chicago Opera association, whof
was unable to appear at the last' May
Festival on account of convalescing
from an operation for appendicitis,
will appear in recital, while early .in
December Alfred Cortot, the eminent
French pianist, will be heard..
In January a distinct inovation in
the Choral Union series will be intro-t
duced by the presentation of Mozart's1
opera "The Impresario." This opera,'
which has been put on so successfully
during the past season under the di-
rection of William Wade Hinshaw, has
made a profound inmpression and is
one of the few worth while musical
numbers of this nature which can be.
staged in Hill auditorium. The erec-
tion of special staging for the use of1
scenery, etc., will be necessary.
Marine Band to Return
Negotiations are also pending with1
the management of the Detroit Sym-
phony orchestra with a view of con-
tinuing the orchetra series 6n a basil
similar to the series conducted last
season. The United t~ates marine
band, which will again make a short
tour by special permission of Pres-
ident Harding and which made such.
a fine impression in the Extra Con-
cert series two years ago, will also
be heard early in the. fall.
The University School of Music ex-
pects to make a complete announce-
ment of all Attractions with definite
dates within the near future. In addi-
tion to these two series of concerts
the Sunday afternoon twilight recitals
and the Thursday afternoon twilight
organ recitals will be presented as
last year.

TOTAL REGISTRY TO SATURDAY
LARGER THAN PRECEEDING
' YEAR
DEAN KRAUS PREPARES
FOR MORE THAN 3,000
School of Education Shows Greatest
Increase; Teaching Staff
Enlarged
Figures for enrollment in the Sum-
mer session up to last night show a
decided increase over the figures giv-
en out at the same time last year with
the single exception of the engineering
college.
The total from all departemnts is
1,441. The different departments tot-
al as follows: Literary, 655; engin-
eering and architecture, 271; medic,
124; pharmacy, 13; law, 152; gradu-
ate, 60, and education, 66. The fact
that the Engineering college does not
open until Tuesday and that the ma-
jority of the students expected to en-
roll there are regular session students,
is a possible expanation for the small
figures in that department.
The School of Education shows the
greatest increase. This department,
which was only begun last Summer
session, has been exceedingly success-
ful, according to officials. Due to the
enormous increase, the teaching staff
has been added to this summer 25
per cent.
Coaches' School Popular
The summer School for Coaches,
starting for the first time, in the
School of Education and headed by
Fielding H. Yost, Michigan football
coach, will show a total of more than
50 by Monday night, officials state.
More than 1,500 more students are
expected to enroll Monday, which will
make a total of approximately 5,000
students enrolled in the Summer ses-
sion. This will make an increase of
3004 to 400 more than attended the
Summer session last year.
According to Dean Edward H. Kraus
it is impossible to make accurate pre-
dictions, du to the fact that registra-
tion this year is a week earlier than
last year, and that school did not open
last year until Tuesday, a holiday be-
ing declared for the 4th of July. -
Figures Encouraging
"Figures of last year for Saturday
night," said ;Dean Kraus, "have ,been
exceeded or equaled in all depart-
ments with the exception of engineer-
ing. I have reasons to believe that
the enrollment for this year will ex-
ceed all others"
Summer school has become an es-
tablished institution in American .,ed-
ucation. It started about 30 years ago
and since that time has grown with
great rapidity. Teachers may now
take specialized work in any pstic-
ular branch of education they may-de-
sire.
The teaching staff for the summer
will approximate 300 professors, in-
structors and assistants. The com-
plete number of courses to be given
during the Summer session totals 475.
Al mnus to Sail for Europe
Catherine F. Reighard, '15~leaves to-
day for New York where she sails on
Tuesday for Europe. Miss Reighard
is a former Women's league president.

I

PLENTY OF ROOMS OFFERED
FOR WOMEN STUDENTS HERE
Plenty of rooms are available' this
summer for women, according to
Miss Helen C. Bishop, acting dean of
women for the Summer session. Be-
cause of the fact that the enrollment
during the summer is less than that
of the regular school year. A few of
the places have made arrangements to
serve meals at the rooming houses.
Lists of rooms may be secured from
the dean of women in the registrar's
office.

SU1LMIER DAILY TRYOUTS
WANTED
Students attending the Sum-
mer session and who wish to try
out for positions on The Summer
Michigan Daily staff should re-
port between 1 and 5 o'clock
in the afternoon at the Press
building.
Tryouts for the business de-
partmeht should see Herold C.
Hunt, business manager; for the
editorial department, James
Young, city editor.

..,
k

Thursday, July 20
5 p. m.-The Teacher College Move-
ment. Charles McKenny, president
of Michigan State Normal college,
Ypsilanti.
8 p. m.-Michigan Union Spotlight'
entertainment. (Hill auditorium.)

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