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June 24, 1922 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-06-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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MICHIGAN DAILY

TI I MICHIGAN DAILY

SOR TRVEBLOOD TO
URE ON WESTERN T
Thomas C. Trueblood, he
ic speaking department
eblood will spend the sur
rnia and Colorado. Prof
d has ben engaged to giv
and lecture-recitals at
sessions of several stat
s enroute and will spend
our days at each of the
ited,

POUR
ad of
,and
mmer
essor
e five
the
.e in-
from
col-

"write" gift. A box of station-
om .O. D. Morrill's, 17 Nickels'
e.-Adv.
r's Pen Shops, 308 S. State.--
Rent A
Cypewriter
Of
[Hamilton Business
College -
State and William Streets

Illinois Dean Wri
"Shall I JO
"Joining a fraternity is a good deal
like getting married-it is an easy
thing upon which to generalize, butt
a delicate matter upon which to give
concrete advice in specific instances,"
Thomas Arkle Clark, dean of students
at the University of Illinois, remarks
in his article: "Shall I Join a Fra-
ternity?" just published in the June
issue of The American Boy.
For 20 years Dean Clark has been
actively connected with students at
Illinois and has been declared success-
ful in handling them.. While at col-,
lege he was not a fraternity man, but
joined some five years later.
"Joining a fraternity is like marry-
ing in another way," the dean con-
tinues. "When a man first contem-
plates marriage, he imagines that the
ceremony will link him only to the girl
in question; he does ndt realize that
he has married her whole family; so a
boy who joins a fraternity not only be-
comes one o a small group of men, but
also assumes a binding obligation to
the other chapters of the fraternity,
wherever they may be found.'.
"'Influence Is G~ood" a
"Colleges whose doors have hitherto
been closed to the admission of frater-
nities to come in, and all this because
those who knew the most about fra-

UILINGS' DINING ROOMS
Cool and Well Ventilated. Home Cooking.

714 Monroe Street, just off State Street.
One block south of Campus.

EST MEALS AT MODERATE PRICES I

tes Article On
in A Fraternity"
ternities think their influence a good
one. Those who oppose fraternities
most are the ones who have no inside
knowledge of fraternity life."
Dean Clark sees in fraternity life
a parallel with life in the world in
that "in a fraternity a man has to
yield{his personal desires and rights
to the will of the organization. He
must learn to get on with People, to
give up, and be unselfish, and do that
which is most helpful and advantage-
ous to his brothers."'
Joseph A. Bursley, dean of students
at Michigan, has become acquainted
with Dean Clark through the conven-
tions of deans held in state colleges of
the Middle West each year. The opin-
ions of Dean Clark, he says, were
highly respected by the entire assem-
blage of deans at Lexington, Ky.,
where they met this winter.
Likened to Marriage
The relationship between fraternity
and married life is strong in Dean
Clark's mind. He continues his
treatise: "No boy should join a frater-
nity simply because he is asked or
because his friends are doing so, any
more than he should marry for the
same reasons. The expenses of fra-
ternity are high,--about 20 per cent
higher than independent life," he has
estimated.
"Before joining a fraternity a fresh-
man should learn of its history, its
local standing, the cost of membership,
the activity, scholarship and moral
and social characteristics of its active
members, especially its upper class-
men. For the character of the upper
classmen determines largely the char-
acter of the chapter. He ought to ask
questions of unprejudiced persons and
the safest man is ordinarily the dean
of men, who if he is the fight sort will
tell him frankly."
M. A. C. WILL ' GIVE
COACHING COURSES
East Lansing, June 23.-A summer
coaching school for high school
coaches and directors of physical
training is to le conducted at the
Michigan Agricultural College this
year, The course will be under the
direction of M. A. C. athletic directors
and will be considered a reeular
course in the college's summer school.
The high school coaches will be put
through a schedule of lectures and
field work. Methods of coaching foot-
ball, track, basketball and baseball
squads will be emphasized and the
field work will necessitate the stu
dents getting into uniform for work-
outs.i Instruction will also be given
in playground directing and mass ?cal-
isthenics.
A two year coaching course, to be
combined, as a subsidiary course, with
The regular college curriculum, is
being considered by M. A. C. authori-
ties. If installed, juniors and s'enicrs
will be eligible, and their training will
be directed with a view of sending
them out, at graduation time, qualified
to coach high school or college teams
or direct-physical education in educa-
tional institutions.
The smallest Dunn Pen holds as
much ink as the largest self filler. 0.
D. Morrill, dealer, 17 Nickels' Arcade.
-Adv.
GARRICK Th S2urc... 25
Nights, 25-50-75c-$1
13th Annual Season Seventh Week.
The Bonstelle Co
This Week "The Second Mrs. Tanqueray"
urn us wa ur s*s asl

(By Associated Press) t
Tokio (by Mail)-Mr. Ichiro Sakai,t
Spanish language instructor at thet
Colonial School in Koishikawa, claimst
to have discovered a theory of abso-
lutism, which is contrary to Einstein'sz
theory of relativity. He developed the
idea of explaining the universe by ab-
solutism while looking for the best
method of teaching grammar.'
Interviewed by the Nichi Nichi, Mr.
Sakai sadi:4
"I wonder why men of profound
thinking like Professor Einstein couldl
not discover the theory of absolut-
i-m. I did not encounter any great E
'difficulty in discovering it. Kant and
Socrates will dwindle into insignifi-
cance beside this theory which will
revolutionize the medical, philosoph-
ical, physical, economic and religious
worlds. What gives me great satis-
faction is the thought that the theory
which I discovered will strike at the
very foundation of monism. The theory
of absolutism proves the reality of the
conceptions of soul, heaven, hell and
other ideas which believers in the doc-
trine of monism laugh at as creations
of a cracked brain. The theory of
relativity cannot be explained unless {
by means of high mathematics while
the theory I discovered is easy to
understand.
"According to my theory, the soul is
as stern a reality as the most visible
thing on earth. The eye, mouth, leg.
hand, color, sound and everything else
on the earth are not dead but living
things. In the same way, the brain
which is in itself a dead thing, be-
cause a living thing when it comes in
touch with a thing, and that thing is
the soul. The soul is an invisible
thing, but it becomes visible when it
comes in touch with the brain."

FOREIGN INSTRUCTOR
UNCOVERS NEW THEORY
OPPOSING EINSTEI

d
7
j
i

'UOWTLES

A place to brir g your friends. Nowhere is
the food better; nowhere is the service
more prompt. Open all summer.
,TUTTLE'S LUNCH ROOM
MAYNARD STREET

SOCIAL AGENCIES DEVELOP
ILEAD.ERSIIIP, SAYS EDUCATOR
Kansas City, Mo., June 23.-Com-
munity agencies have strengthened the
program of developing efficient lead-
ership in religious education, Lansing
E. Smith, chairman of the Children's
Division of the International Sunday
School Association, and president of
the American Sunday School Society,
told the convention of the Interna-
tional Sunday School Association here
today.. I
"By having all schools of all deiomi,,
nations 'in a'given community included
in one organization,' Mr. Smith said,
"we are able to obtain the strongest
leaders in the community, including
college professors, as well as the out-
standing leaders among the lay work-
ers, whose services could only be se-
cured on account of this enlarged op-
portunity to serve."

U. S. FOREIGN T]
MARRED

Su

I

Secure your supplies at

E R
IN.

I'

STUDENTS SUPPLY STORE
1111 South University Avenue
Materials for All Colleges

Washington, June 23.-Accuracy of
the country's official foreign trade re-
ports is being seriously jeopardized
by the carelessness of some exporters
in the preparation of shippers' export
declarations, according to a statement
issued today by the Commerce Depart-
ment. More care in the preparation of
these important documents was asked
by the department.
"Accurate, timely trade statistics
will be impossible," the statement said,
"uniess shippers extend moie personal
cooperation in seeing that the neces-
sary papers are properly prepared.
The work' should not be assigned to
boys or some secondary. agency hav-
ing no special interest in the matter."
Try a Daily Want Ad. It pay.-Adv.

h

to
an
(On
Fines
Room,
ing. StE
'Every
Put-
Buff

'a- -
- ---
Daily Service
PUT-IN-BAY r
4 SANDUSKY
the Big Steamer Put-in-Bay)
st exclusive Excursion Steamer, Largest Ball 4
Finzel's Orchestra. No extra charge for dane-
eamiers leave on Eastern Time.
day from Detroit at 9:00 a. m. for
In-Bay-Connecting with Cloveland and
alo Transit Co., and Steamer Arrow for

cacation

I,

Middle Bass, Kelley's Island and Lakeside.
Sandusky-Connecting with Railroads and Suburban Lines, Fare $1.40
Cedar Point-15 mi. byferry trom Sandusky, Fare including ferry, 1.65
Excursion fares, (returning same day)
Put-In-Bay, week day, 80c; Sundays, Holidays, $1.15 Round trip.
Sandusky, every day, $2.00 Roundtrip.
Four hours at Put-In-Bay; Bathing, visit the Caves, Perry's Monument.
Pavilion, Groves, Dancing and many other attractions, several Hotels.
Cedar Point-Fresh waterrival to Atlantic City; Large Hotels, Board Walk,
[housands bathe here daily.
Returning: Leave Cedar Point by Ferry for Sandusky. Leave Sandusky
rom Big Four Dock 2:30 n.m. Put-In-Bay 4:30 P. m. Arr. in Detroit 800 P. mn.
lancing Moonlights. Leave , Ashley & Dustin Steamer Line
)etroit 8:45p.m. Fare Wed.
.Thurs..60cSat. Sun. 75c. Foot of First St. Detroit, Mich.
Write for map folder

ceeds

A visit to our store will convince you that we
have many items with which you can eajoy
your vacation with more pleasure and comfort,
many of which you can not well be without,
Bathing Suits, Knit Coats and Sweaters:
in Tom Wye and Bradley line, all kinds
for men, ladies and children.
Knickers, and Breeches in large assort-
ment for ladies and men.
White Duck, Linen and Khaki Trousers,
Sport Suits, Caps, etc.
Hiking Shoes, Wool Socks, Golf Hose,
Leggings, Puttees, 'Officers' Dress and
Army Shoes, Tennis Shoes, Waterproof
and High-Top Moccasin Pack Shu for
ladies and men.

I

O. D. Wool, Khaki and fine Popli Army Shirts, Pongee Dress and Sport Shirts, all kinds
of Underwear.

- 4..W

I

f f

O,
p
6
A
t
a

U ___

THIS WEEK END SPECIAL

Fresh

Strawberry

More Michigan men play
Billiards than is the case
Uof any other American or
foreign University.
Tlis has been true now
for a period of about six-
Uteen years.
S The reason.
8IJ.TTAUDS CIGARS CAN61ES
P$PES LUNCHES SODAS
e%' try to treat you right

Ul
AI
!i
Ul
i@

Canoe Blankets, Cushions, Auto
Robes, Army Blankets
Knapsacks Barracks Bags, Canteens, Mess Cans, Grills, Stoves, Serving Sets, "Gold Meda
Camp Furniture," Cots, Stools, Tables, etc.

Cravanettes, Rain Coats, Slickers and Ponchos.

and Mosquito Tents; all sizes.

Reg. Wall Tents, Auto-Touro, "Pup"

THIS ESPECIALLY GOOD ICE CREAM WILL BE ON SALE
SATURDAY AFTERNOON AT YOUR DEALER'S

ICE CR EA

It
U
e

a

i
I

Surplus SupplieStore, 2j3N.4thAve.
"It pays to walk a few blocks"

rH ONE S 1427 - 2830

I

wa- ugnnnMsu

----------
-------- - ---- - --- --

4

4

I

A

DANCES Every SATURDAY EVENING

ll

Best Floor and Best Music.

Tickets at Door.

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