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June 24, 1922 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-06-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY ~~~PAGEI TU

.

CampDavis
Notes
(By Summer Daily Correspondent)
Camp Davis is located at Douglas,
Cheboygan county, Michigan. Course
4 in surveying for engineering stu-
dents is taught here during the sum-
mer, the enrollment being divided into
two groups, each group being in at-
tendance half of the summer session.
Professor C. T. Johnson is director
of the camp this year.. The work at
the camp includes courses in azimuth
work, plane table and stadia surveys,
railroad, land, triangulation, hydro-
graphic and other surveys. Instruc-
tion is also given inicamp maintenance
and direction.
Camp activities will be reviewed
regularly in The Summer Daily by a
special correspondent. Reports of the
first week's activities follow:
The Black Fly, the camp paper, has
started publication and proved itself
to be a fit companion for its predeces-

isors of former camp sessions. The
camp coat of arms, designed and exe-
cuted by the art staff, is composed of
an approximate motto and scroll,
crossed axes and stafles, and a log-
book rampant.
Games are now being playe~d off
every evening in both the "Red I" and
the "White Mule" leagues. Competi-
tion for the camp championship is to
be .contested on visitors' day by the
two league champions.
Practice will start soon for the men
who will represent the camp on for-
eign diamonids this summer, with Al
Cuthbert, '22E, as manager. No defi-
nite schedule of outside games has
been arranged thus far,dbut the man-
ager has been communicating with
several teams, and games will prob-
ably be lined up soon with both To-
pinabee and Bay View.

POST-WAR EUROPE

Brawl and bawl;
Court Cares Not

DYER-ARMED Now,

GERMANS

CLAIM

GERMANY'S DELEGATES AT GENOA
CONFERENCE PRESENT FULL
STATISTICS
1,000,000 MORE MEN IN
ARMS, FIGURES SHOW
Poland Has Force of 300,000; Greece
Increases From 40,000
to 300,00

Typewriters of standard makes sold
and rented. 0. D. Morrill, 17 Nickels'
Arcade.-,Adv.

Watch the building program
The Summer Daily.-Adv.

with

Have your Shoes fitted by1

X-Ray

(By Associated Press)
Washington, June 23.-Germany laid
before the Genoa Conference figures
showing that there are today under
arms in Europe nearly a. million more
soldiers than there were when it was
on the verge of the World War in
in 1913. According to the German
statement which has just reached
Washington there are now in Europe a
grand total of 4,736,000 men under
arms compared with 3,726,641 in the
year 1913.
While the mighty German army of
760,000 men of 1913 shrunk to the
100,000 soldiers allowed by the Ver-
sailles Treaty, the French army which
in that year numbered 883,000, this
year stands at 880,000.dGreece's army
has increased from 40,000 to 300,000
and Belgium's army from 54,641 to
113,400, the statement shows. Rus-
sia's vast army, which in 1913 num-
bered 1,845,0000, now is rated at 1,-
600,000 men.
New armies appear in the German
statement. Poland, for instance, an
unknown power in 1918, is now ap-
pearing with an army of 300,000 men.
Then there is Esthonia with 25,000,
Finland with 28,000, Lettonia with 25,-
000, Lithuania with 25,000 and Czecho-
Slovakia with 250,000, all unknown as
military forces before the World War.
Finally it was shown to the Genoa
Conference that while in the year 1913
the German army comprised 20 per
cent of the total armies of Europe
compared with 23 1-5 per cent for
France, at present the German per-
centage is but 2 against 18/ per cent
for France.

Chicago, June 23.-A loud discussion
on a railway coach between conductor
and passenger, "whether it concern a
bag, or the suspected contents of a
bag," rather than constituting disor-
derly conduct in a public place some-
times has "its compensating and ex-
hilirating effect upon the general body
of passengers," according to the rul-
ing of a New Jersey court in the case
of State vs. Gross, N. J., 115 Atl. 743,.
as cited by Chester G. Varnier in the
Journal of the American Institute of
Criminal Law and Criminology The
court as quoted by Mr. Varnier hand-
ed down the opinion that such a dis-
cussion "might be the means of pro-
voking an innocent mental diversion
for the benefit of the curious passen-
gers,"
The court decided, according to Mr.
Vernier, that while a steam railroad
car is a quasi public place, as between
the state and the railroad, it is not a
"place," Within the meaning of an or-
dinance of a city prohibition," in any
place in the city the making of any
improper noise, riot, disturbance, or
disorderly behavior.
"kA discussion in{an elevated key on a
railway, carriage," the opinion reads,
"is not an unusual episode in every-day
American railway life, nor can it be
said to be without its compensation,
and exhilirating effect upon the gen-
eral body of passangers, so long as it
does not assume the intoleraint form
of vulgarity, or obscenity, and, thus
warrant the ejection from the train of
the malodorous disputant"

TWO WEEKS LEFT TO FILE the camp, officers believe, it was
CAMP CUSTER APPLICATIONS stated that many may be rejected for
physical disabilities, or other causes,
Candidates for admission into the and for that reason all late applica-
citizens' military training camp open- tions will be given the fullest consid-
ing at Camp Custer, August 2, have eration.
approximately two weeks left in which The Michigan quota is a third of the
to file their applications, according to ?total, and the Wolverines are expected
information at recruiting headquarters 'to be fully represented. The camp
for the camp here, will continue through September 2.
The quota for the sixth corps area, While the age limits for candidates
including Michigan, Wisconsin and Illi- is ordinarily 18 to 27 years, an ex-
nois, is 3,000 men, and while it is esti- ception is being made for former
mated that more than this number al- service men, who will be admitted up
ready have asked for assignment to to the age of 35.
I SM MERSES S 1oNI

JUNE 26 - AUGUST 18
SHORTHAND
TYPEWRITING
BOOKKEEPING
SECRETARIAL
TRAINING

I

Hamilton Business College

STATE AND WILLIAM STS.

ANN ARBOR

at

==

--a-T~ ,.... .

., = -=

O'KANE & HERTLER'9s

,
;, - r
,. '

mee
--

_'

t.. i

339 South Main Street

.A

The X-Ray method we employ in fitting
feet works like the focus of a camera. It shows
you distindtly the bones of your feet as they lie
inside the shoe. This eliminates all doubt as to
whether or not your shoes will be comfortable
after a few days of wear.
When in need of Footwear, call and let us
show you our line, and let us fit you properly by
x-ray. It's service to you without extra charge.

S TUDEBAKERbUlds more
six-cyi drC er than any
the manufacturer because
Studebaker builds them better.
@ can show you .84 definite
ponts of superiority, in the
Special.- Six over Studebaker's
nearest competitor,
In tines ofclose competition,
merit wind. Today competition
ir automobiles is keener than it
ever was, because people are

buying more carefully than ever.
Studebaker increased its sales
29% in 1921,though the industry,
as a whole, showed a falling off of
nearly 45%. 1922, up to May
I st, shows a gain in Studebaker
production of 143% over the
same period of 1921.
Studebaker sales records tell their
own story. The buying public
has declared forStudebakersupe-
riority.

HARRIS HALL OPENED FOR
SUMMER SCHOOL STUNNTS
Harris Hall, the Parish House of St.
Andrew's church, has been opened for
the summer session. The hall will be
open from 9 a. m. to 9:30 p. i., and
all student members of the Episcopal
church are invited to use its reading
and study roomos. The secretary,
Miss Haviland, will be in the office
from 9 until 12.

Touxrin., $1475 Roadster (2-Pass.), $1425; R->adsler (4-Pass.);11475;
Coue (4-Pass.). $2150; Sedan, $2350. All prices f. o. b. factory.

I

I

Palm

Beach

Suits

I.

We also wish to emphasize the unusual values found in our Halifax Tweeds
and Palm Beach Suits and Golf Sweaters. You are always able to use these
clothes to advantage and that is one reason why they are so economical. Hal-
ifax Tweed suits complete are selling for $18.00. Don't delay in making
your selection because, at this price we expect them to move.
Palm Beach Suits from $10.00 up - These are all ready to wear.
EARLY SHOWING OF FALL SUITINGS

t

I

I.

Karl.v

Atalcoim

Washtenaw Motor Co.
"There Is Only One"
Phone 2558 207 E. Washington St.

T H I S IS A S T UD E B A K E R Y E A

"I

R

r

'' !

I-i

I

Themmmerfrciqan Dily

I

I

THE BEST PART OF SUMMER SCHOOL.

PUBLISHED

I

DAILY THROUGHOUT THE SUMMER SESSION

0

'I

I

$1

ON THE CAMPUS OR AT THE PRESS BUILDING I
DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR 1

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