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August 12, 1922 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-08-12

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PAGE TWO

THL SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, AUGUST 12,

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1id~tgin

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OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OFTHE SUMMER SESSION OF
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Summer
Session by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for re-
publication of all news dispatches credited to it or otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
CIaS"amatter..
Subscription by carrier or mail, $1.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street.
Phone.: Business, g6o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signa-
ture not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of faith,
and notices of events will be published in The Summer Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Sumiher Daily
office. Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No
manuscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Summer Daily does not necessarily endorse the senti-
ments expressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR ................LEO J. HERSHDORFER
City Editor........................... ........James B. Young
Night Editors-
Howard A. Donahue Julian E. Mack
W. 'B. Butler
Women's Editor............................Dorothy Bennetts
Editorial Board....................Herbert S. Case, Ellen Nylund
Humor Editor ....................................Donald Coney
Literary Editor.....................................G. D. Eaton
Assistants

Portia Goulder
Janet Menges

C. R. Trotter
Thelma Andrews

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER ...................HEROLD C. HUNT
Advertising........................ .........Townsend H. Wolfe
Publication.............................George W. Rockwood
Accounts....................................Laurence H. Favrot
Circulation.................... ..............Edward F. Conlin
Assistants

Philip H. Goldsmith

Katherine E. Styer

Alma E. Young
SATURDAY, AUGUST 12, 1922
Night Editor-JULIAN ELLIS MACK
Assistant-Robert Ramsay
WHEN CRITICS FALL OUT
On another page of today's issue of The Sum-
mer Daily will be found a communication which
takes exception to the criticism which appeared in
Friday's issue of "The Melting Pot," as produced
by members of the class in play production. The
writer of the communication contends that the critic
was entirely wrong in his review of the performance,
although she does declare "in my opinion the rendi-
tion of this play was one of the best." The com-
munication is a matter of opinion, just as much as
The Summer Daily's criticism was an opinion. In
the matter of the writer's contentions that she was
pleased with the play, no differences can arise, for
the columns of The Summer Daily are always open
to expressions of opinion.
But there is no substantiation for the statement
in the concluding paragraph, in which it is claim--
ed that inasmuch as dramatic productions on the
campus are works of effort, they should be com-
mended and encouraged. Criticism of this char-
acter would be negative in effect, for a review
which praises at all times, whether the cause justi-
fies the honors or not, is more destructive than no
review at all. It is granted campus organizations
generally work hard, but to pat them on the back
when they are deserving of commendation would
be of more harm than benefit. To do so would be
flattery-ard flattery is the arch-enemy of suc-
cess.
GIVE IT TO 'EM STRAIGHT
When students return to their home town after
the Summer session is ended, they are invairably
asked what sort of time they have while at the
University. Many of them are inclined to relate
exciting tales of their experiences during periods of
gayety and lightened' responsibility. They feel that
their friends expect to hear stories of this nature,
and in response to this feeling, they tell only of the
"colorful" side of their college days.
Of course there would be no advantage in the
student complaining of unfortunate circumstances.
But it is a great mistake for him to tell only of a
few "parties" which fit in with the general story-
book conception of college life. When the student
is asked about his experiences here, he should paint
the true picture; he should mention the fact that all
is not play at a great educational institution. It is
all too easy to convey the wrong impression of a
University through careless descriptions of college
life.
*THE SUMMER SESSION PROGRAM
A survey of the lecture program of the Sum-
mer session cannot but cause a feeling of satis-
faction to those who have taken advantage of it,
and a feeling of regret for those who have not done
so. The program has been especially well worked
out from the stand point of variety of subjects andl
also from the excellence of their presentation. The
subjects have covered almost every field interesting
to the students of the Summer session as music,
religion, sociology, economics, astronomy, geology,
politics, the sciences, geography, dramatics and edu-
cation.
A university audience is as a whole a critical one
and the favorable manner in which the summer's
program has been received indicates that the lec-
f

tures and entertainments have been successful. The
excursions with the exception of those to Put-in-
Bay and Niagara Falls, which are a new feature of
this year's program have been- an important feature
and one which it is hoped will he continued in the
future.
The Summer session program is on the whole
most commendable and has filled its purpose as well
as was expected.
Ohio State is already in a fever of excitement in
anticipation of her game with Michigan in the fall.
It is claimed, however, that a sudden shock will re-
duce fever.
History repeats. Certain conscientious professors,
it is rumored, are following tradition by doling out
heavy last-minute assignments on the eve of finals.
The All-A student says that he has already packed
his trunk and bought his train tickect. And the lone'
frosh pipes up, "I don't C how he does it."
O Lords of the unions and the rails, be gracious to
the children of the Summer session and settle your
strike before Friday the 18th.
.4.R~.S...*.. . *... ... ...... .... .............
TH E'FRYING PAN
"-a flash in the Pan."
PER TINAX
The lion and the unicorn support the royal shield
And give one the impression that Britons seldoml
yield.
(That there is a British lion, we may pass without
remark ;
If you really want to see one take the 'bus for
Regent's Park)
Once a British logic-chopper in a syllogistic mist
Built a thesis on the premiss that "unicorns exist."
When they tried to controvert him he maintained "It
must be so
For I'm sure the Heralds' College must have seen
one long ago."
So they chartered him a vessel and he sailed around
the Horn
At the head of a commission to bring back a uni-
corn.
They found many coral islands spreading spices on
the breeze
But not a sign of unicorn beneath the tropic trees.
They worked northward to the Arctic and among
the polar floes;
"Haylo seeum unicornus" said the sturdy Eskimos.
The old vessel was abandoned after years of storms
and shocks
But the party, changing tactics, searched the rec-
ord of the rocks.
They were combing the Devonian in the years be-
fore the war
For a mono-keratoidal Ichthy-ptero-dinosaur.
And upon the judgment-morning when St. Gabriel
blows his horn,
There will still be this commission looking for a
unicorn. CALPURNIA.
Wonder who writes Mr. Ford's page in the Dear-
born Independent?
The Irish have cut ten Atlantic telegraph cables
Ringside news will be somewhat delayed now.
"Ex-Kaiser Wins Suit." Well, maybe he needs it.
Along the first of the
summer we lent the managing ed
a book
(we did)
and ever since we have been trying
to get it back
(you know)
of course we couldn't put the
officers of the law
onto him
because he is
our friend

well last night he
brought it back.
we are slowly recovering
THROUGH AMERICAN HISTORY ON ROIL.
ER SKATES
III: The Mexican Altercation
The Mexican war was a mere squabble between
two Texas gentlemen over the amount of heat in
hot tamales. Both disputants were later sent to
congress.
IV: The un-Civil War
The Civil War, the United tSates' fourth war of
consequence, was fought between the two political
factions of the country. It was the result of party
avaricity as to who should get the Nego vote.
During this war there were two great battles,
(f which the Battle of Gettysburg was the most out-
standing. It was fought between Lincoln, Robert E.
Lee, and the 25th congress.
Bull Run, the other good battle, was named after
a race in the 1890 Olympian games. During the
course of the battle the Union commander gave
voice to that well known gen of thought, "A rolling
stone 'gathers no moss."
LUKE WARM.
The Question of the Day
"When does your train leave ?"
CALIGULA.

DETROIT UNITED L114 ES
TIME TABLE
Ann Arbor and ackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Exprers Cars;-6 :oo
a. M., 7:oo a. mn., 8:01 A. m.. o-oo a. m. and
hourly to 9:os p. m.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor)-9 :47 a. mn. and every two hours to
9:47 P. Mn
Local Cars, East Bound-5:5 a. m., 7:00
a m. and every two hours to 9:oo p. m.;
t :oo p. in. ,lTo Ypsilanti only-1 :4o p. in.,
1 2:25 a. in., 1-15 a. in.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars, west Bound-7:5o a. M., 2:40
P. M.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo- Limited cars:
8:47, 10:47, a. .i.; 12:47, 2:47. 447 p. m.
To1 ackson and Lansing-Limited: 8:4
P. Mn.

311111111111111 Iili11111lIllll llt llj
r r
rE
= New Fall
HATS
r _
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A rribing daily
SPuyear & Lintz
328 South Main Street
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1922
6
13
20
27

1 T
1
7 S
14 15
21 22
2S 29

AUGUST
W T
2 3
9 10
10 17
23 21
30 31

F
4
11
18
25

1922
C
5
12
19
26

1I h d

PANAMA AND STRAW HATS
CLEANED THE RIGHT WAY
Prices for cleaning Pananias $1.25 up.
Prices for stiff straws...... .75 up.
We do only high class work.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephione 1792

Here's, a List That Will Help_ Your
Going Away More Comfortable:

! .l

For Your Summer Reading
BOOK'S
from
GRAHAM'S
Both Mores

A fact-

It's hard to serve
good foods all the
time, but the Ar-
cade Cafeteria
manages to do it.
It's still harder to
serve them eco-
nomically. We've
triumphed here,
too.
The ARCADE
CAFETERIA
Upstairs i n Nickels A r c a die

w

Typewriters of all ea
TYPEWRITINO and
MI MEOCRAP HI NO
Promptlyand'neatly done
0. D. MORRILL, 17 Nickels Arcade

Golf Hose
Shirts
With Collar Attached
Irish Poplin. Ties
(Just arrived)
Athletic Underwear
Camel Hair Sweaters
Bathing Suits
Linen Knickers
Knox Hats
(New Fall Styles)
Caps

u

I

We have just received a shipment
of Thomas Townsend and
Tress Imported Caps
WAL-
J "" id "

TAILORING

FURNISHINGS

IL .

Auto Robes and Steamer Rugs
You will need an Auto Robe for the car these cool evenings, a few extra
blankets for the bed these cold nights, or an all Wool U. S. Army Blanket
for the camp or cottage any time. We have a large assortment at lowest
prices.

TENTS,
All kinds and sizes. Reg. Wall,
Auto-Touro. Mosquito, A r m y
Pyramid,and Children's Play Tents
Tom Wye Sweaters
and Coats

Knickers, Breeches.

White Duck

and Khaki Trousers, Underwear,
Shirts, Hose, Shoes, Packs, etc.

Outing Goods and Camp Equipment
Folding Cots, Chairs, Stools, Tables, Stoves, Grills, Serving Sets, Barracks
Bags, Canvas Buckets and Squad Trunks, Mess Cans, Canteens, Axes,
Trench Shovels, R. R. Lanterns, Auto-Luggage Carriers, etc.

Surplus Supplies Stoe

2,13,,,X, 4th Ave.

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