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August 10, 1922 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-08-10

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PAG3 TWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 1922

PAG! TWO THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 1922

Mart Ountmrr

£ir1itpin

tUiIQ

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER SESSION OF
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Summer
Session by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for re-
publication of -all news dispatches credited to it or otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
Mass matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $t.so.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street.
Phonest Business, 96; Editorial, a4Z4.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signa-
ture not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of faith.
and notices of events will.be published in The Summer Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Summer Daily
office. Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No
manuscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Summer Daily does not necessarily endorse the senti-
ments expreseed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR ................LEO J. HERSHDORFER
City Editor....................................James B. Young
Night Editors-
Howard A. Donahue Julian E. Mack
W. B. Butler
Women's Editor.............................Dorothy Bennetts
Editorial Board....................Herbert S. Case, Ellen Nylund
Humor Editor ..........................:.........Donald Coney
Literary Editor...............................G. D. Eaton
Assistapts

Portia Goulder
Janet Menges

C. R. Trotter
Thelma Andrews

BUMSEESS STAFF

i

i

Telephone 960

BUSINESS MANAGER ...................HEROLD C. HUNT
Advertising.................................Townsend H. Wolfe
!'ublication ............................ George W. Rockwood
Accounts..............................Laurence H. Favrot
Circulation......................................Edward F. Conlin
Assistants

Philip H. Goldsmith

Katherine E. Styer

Alma E. Young
THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 1922
Night Editor-JAMES B. YOUNG
Assistant-R. C. Trotter
A FOOL THERE WAS
It is hard for an individual to tell whether he is
being a sport or a fool when he does what he
doesn't want to do because someone said: "Oh
come on, be a sport." The task becomes doubly
hard after one has started to do it because one can
think of at least a dozen ways in which the request
might have been nullified, but strangely enough one
can never remember in a similar situation what this
striking retort should have been. That one sent-
ence, "Be a sport," has turned countless individuals
from self respecting individuals into weak and
vacillating minions.
With this plea Cain probably got all his spending
money, as have almost all his kindred after him. It
would be interesting to know what Adam thought
being a sport consisted in, and if he did not fall for
it, how he answered his temptor. Nevertheless,
very few people can withstand a desire to appear a
good fellow and a sport in the eyes of others, and
so the boy smokes a vile tasting first cigarette, and
the first airman arose to the sky for he thought
that to do otherwise would brand him as being a
poor sport.
There are two kinds of fools, those who are will-
ing to appear as fools rather than do something they
do not desire, and those who are willing to be fools
without appearing as such. One of the hardest
blows to an ordinary individual with the custom-
ary amount of conceit, is that of being condemned
by one's fellow beings. Of course if this phrase
"being a sport" were analyzed and studied it would
swerve one but slghtly, depending upon one's in-
terpretation of a sport, but otherwise it has a
ypnotic appeal which is rarely resisted.
The duty then of all those who have the inter-
ests of mankind at heart and of each one who de-
sires to do a monumental work whose significance
would last through the ages, should be to invent or
coin a phrase -with as much appeal and which will
counteract effectively the urge to be a sport.
ANOTHER ON SWIMMING
Municipal institutions in Ann Arbor do not bear
the. significant marks of existing purely for public
benefit;, which is demonstrated in other cities.
In a neighboring city, two years ago, two splendid
swimming pools were erected by the municipal parks
department. The equipment of these two pools in-
cludes more than one hundred lockers each, show-
er baths, diving boards, adequate life-saving facilit-
ies, and rest rooms. Fresh water from the city's
supply of drinking water, is pumped into the pools
daily. All of this hot weather recreation is furnish-
ed free of charge to the bathers. Not even a "nom-
inal fee" is exacted.1
. Here in Ann Arbor with the God-given water of
the Huron river to swin in, and a bath house of or-
dinary wooden construction, it has been found neces-
sary to charge bathers for the use of lockers. It is
true that the charge is only "nominal," and it is
argued that a large majority of the patrons of the
municipal beach are students of the University.
Neither the students nor the University is a city
taxpayer, so why should not the former contribute
directly to the support of the beach?
Children of sixteen years of age, or under, are ad-
mitted free. The inference might be drawn that the
charge to the older patrons, is intended to discour-

age their attendance at the beach in preference to
the children. There is perhaps some justification in
this measure..
But the outstanding feature of the municipal
beach, which reminds one vividly of the crowded
summer resort under private management, or of the
new German tourist tax, is the admission charge per
capita for spectators. Each and every friend, par-
ent or guardian of a swimmer over sixteen years of
age, must pay to go out on the beach as a specta-
;or.
Given a river, a beach, and a site for a bath
house, a city charges its citizens and visitors for
the privilege of watching bathers swim on a muni-
cipal beach.
THE POOR HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER
In an editorial of yesterday concerning the pres-
ent-day high schools, the reason for the high school's
failure as an adequate educational institution was
given as being largely because of the type of-teachers
that they employ. It was stated that the high school
teacher as a rule was not an overly intelligent am-
mal, and it might have been added that though ihis
fact is lamentable it is not entirely the teachers'
fault. It is largely the fault of the schools' system.
Assuming that most teachers in high school are col-
lege graduates, then they do not as a rule differ
from other college graduates-and a diploma is not
usually accompanied by any great degree of intellig-
ence. A college course serves little more than to act
as a whip to spur people on, give them initiative, and
instill them with the desire to learn and the ability
to do it with as much ease as possible. If the college
graduate enters a high school as a teacher, he or she
immediately becomes a slave to the present-day high
school system-or loses the job. The position can
be held down without any unnatural mental im-
provement on the part of the teacher as long as the
teaching system is adhered to, and the system as it
exists today tends to discourage real thought on the
part of those who, wishing to remain as teachers, ne-
cessarily must abide by it. Therefore, because teach-
ers do not as a rule develop into exceptional think-
ers, it is not because they themselves are entirely at
fault. For the teachers welfare it might be to their
advantage to get in vogue with the rest of the
country and strike for better high school systems-
systems in which they will have an opportunity to
take advantage of their college education and de-
velop the abilities that are theirs.
............................ ......
THE FRYING PAN
"-a flash is the Pan."
THE S TAFP PITCHER
if this sheet is kinda wobbly
this mornin'
it's becuz the staff had its
daguerreotype
done yestirday
all the staff came
in unaccustomed effulgence of attire
and after introductions had
been performed all around
ite vent and sat in the bright light
(just like the movies)
and when everybody felt he was lookin' like
(a) marillynn miller or
(b) walie reid
the guy pinched the bulb and
the camera clicked and everybody held his
(or her) breath
and the room went round. in dizzy circles
till the camera clicked again
and the guy said
that was only a trial exposure
(just to exercise the camera, don't you know)
i can't think why we didn't slay him.
Gallows-Meat
The chiming dumbell who stretches a "Back in 15
Minutes" sign over three hours.
THROUGH AMERICAN HISTORY ON ROLL-

ER SKATES
I: The Revolutionary War
The Revolutionary war, or war of American In-
dependence, was incited largely by a playful little
gathering in Boston harbor under the auspices of
the Atlantic and Pacific Tea company (not an advt.).
It was fought between the thirteen original colon-
ies united in a state of high excitement, and Eng-
land (an island off the east coast of Ireland) under
the Marquis of Queensbury rules.
The first battle of this war was at Lexington,
Mass. Here the Yankee forces, under command
of the Smith Brothers, soon put the red-coats to
flight.
The clash was immediately followed by the Bat-
tle of Bunker Hill, 1492. This battle was fought
on the Plains of Abraham, (Abraham, Abraham,
and Son, sole lessors) between the Spanish Armada
and the entire Swiss navy.
During the next few days battles became the na-
tianal sport of the new United States. In 186o how-
ever, peace and quietude reigned throughout the
land.
It was at Thermopylae, the decisive battle of this
war, that General Washington made the timely re-
mark: "I just date on puffed Korn Kernels, and
wouldn't be without them." LUKE WARM.
Com-Think there's anything in this psycho-an-
alysis?
Plex-No, but I never tell my dreams anymore.
CALIGULA.

DETROIT UNITED LOIIES
TIME TABLE
Ann Arbor and Jackson
(eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express)Cars-6:oo
a. m., 7:oo a. M., 8:00 a. m., o:oo a. m. and
hourly to g:os p. m.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor)-9 :47 a. m. and every two hours to
9:47 P. m.
Local Cars, East Bound-5:ss a. m., 7:00
a, m. and every two hours to g :o p. in.;
i i :oo p. m. To Ypsilanti only-u :4o p. mn.,
12:25 a. mn., i: Is a.. m.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars, West Bound-7:5o a. M., 2:40
p. M.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo- Limited cars:
8: 0:47, a. m.;2:47, 2:47, 4:47 p. n.
lo Jackson and Lansing-Limited 8:47
p. in.

TUTTLE'S LUNCH ROOM
MAYNARD STREET

1922
S
6
13
20
27

9 T
1
7 8
14 15
21 22
28 29

AUGUST
W T
2 3
9 10
16 17
23 24
30 31

F
4
11
18
25

1922
S
5
12
19
26

PANAMA AND STRAW HATS
CLEANED THE RIGHT WAY
Prices for cleaning Panamas $1.25 up.
Prices for stiff straws...... .75 up.
We do only high class work.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telenhone 1792,
i AUTO LiVERY
WITH OR WITHOUT DRIVER
n"416 S. Main. Ph. 583J (
G~tlu

u
i
t
Ali
m
Ir
r.
n,
.o
d
IP
G

ml., I

For Your Summer Reading
BOOKS
from
GRAHAM'S
Both °tores

LU

- I I

. .. ..
. . ...

SummerStdts
Secure your supplies at
STUDENTS SUPPLY STORE
111 1 South University Avenue
Materials for All Colleges
KO DAK FINIS HING
Our prints are made on Velox.
Materials that are Eastman made and meth-
ods that are Eastman approved, plus the
experience of our experts are guaranties of
finest quality finishing.
1Wring us your films
.g-1JY7AD L S!TflD .1905

TUTTLES

A place to bring your friends.
the food better; nowhere is
more prompt. Open all

w
r,

IMan 55m5eIr UE~~

Nowhere is
the service
summer.

A fact-
You can eat at the
Arcade Cafeteria
with a minimum

of time.

It's ad-

m irably situated
(in Nickels Ar-
cade) close to the
center of your ac-
tivities.
The ARCADE
CAFETERIA

THE
GREY
SHOP
600 E. LIBERTY

Have you had your noon
lunch at
The Grey Shop" yet ?
Hot Specials every noon
Sunday Night
Lunches Served

Upstairs i a

Nickels Arca de

.......

r

Summer School

Students

Why Not Travel via
THE ANN ARBOR RAILROAD
UNEXCELLED TRAIN SERVICE
For accommodation of returning Summer School students, following train service,
Ann Arbor to Toledo, will prevail:

Lv. Ann Arbor-r11:4o A. M. [CT]
Arr. Toledo--.-.-2:10 P. M. [ET]

2:00 P. M. [CT]
5:00 P. M. [ET]

4:30 P. M. [CT]
7:oo P. M. [ET]

For immediate information, below find list of one-way passenger fares from Ann Arbor to
principal destinations via Toledo :

Youngstown, Ohio........................... $8
Akron, Ohio................................. 7
Toledo, Ohio........... ..................i
Marion, Ohio................................5
Cleveland, Ohio ............................. 6
Columbus, Ohio ................ ............ 6
Canton, Ohio. ................................. 7
Cincinnati, Ohio.............................. 9
Dayton, Ohio.............................7
Springfield, Ohio............................. 7

53
47
64
08
IS
72
47
60
64
14

Baltimore, Md.............................$21
Washington, D. C........................... 21
Erie, Pa.................................9
Philadelphia, Pa ............................. 23
Pittsburgh, Pa .....................o
Chicago, Ill... ........................... 10
St. Louis, Mo................................ 16
Louisville, Ky...........................13
Indianapolis, Ind........................ 10
South Bend, Ind........................... 7

77
77
57
45
87
71
95
52
0I
64

NORTH-BOUND TRAINS
North-bound trains Nos. 51 and 53 leave Ann Arbor 8:io A. M. [CT] and 4:41 P. M. [CT],
connecting with Grand Trunk, Michigan Central, Pere Marquette and G. R. & I. for all principal
destinations in lower and upper Peninsula of Michigan.
Try Our "Across Lake Route "
in traveling to destinations in Wisconsin and Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Four modern steel
passenger ships, splendidly equipped, in service year round between ports of Frankfort, Michigan,
and Manistique, Michigan, Menominee, Michigan, Kewaunee, Wisconsin, Manitowoc, Wisconsin.
H. A. MILLS, Comm'1 Agent, Ann Arbor, Michigan

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