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August 10, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-08-10

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THE WEATHER
GENERALLY FAIR
TODAlY

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XIII. No. 42 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 1922 PRICE FIVE CENTS

-

RY GAREN TO
rAPPEARIN FALL
FIRST APPEARANE () FAMOU
POLISH PIANIST SINCE
1917
ELMAN, KATHRYN MEISLE
WILL ALSO BE HEARD
Many Distinguished Artists on Pro-
gram in Concert Series and
May Festival
Plans for the University concert se-
ries and May festival have been an-
nounced by Charles A. Sink, secretary
of the School of Music, 'who returned
recently from New York, where he
completed arrangements for the ap-
pearance of many distinguished ar-
tists in Ann Arbor next year.
Chief among those booked is Ignace
Jan Paderewski, the world-famous
Polish pianist and statesman. In
1917, Paderewski, renouncing his pro-
fession, returned to his native land,
and was active in the formation of the
new Polish state. He acted as diplo-
mat, premier and president until his
return to America last year. Since
then he has been in seclusion in his
California home, and rumors that he
was to appear again in concert work
could not be confirmed.
Shortly before he sailed for Europe
10 days ago, the announcement was
made that Paderewski would make a
concert tour, under the direction of
George Engles, of New York City,
after his return to this country in
November. Arrangements for con-
certs in Cleveland, Detroit, Chicago.
Philadelphia, New York City, and
Boston have been made for Mr. Pad-
erewski in addition to his Ann Arbor
engagement.
Mary Garden to Comee
Of special importance is the ar-
rangement which has been made for a
recital by Mary Garden, the famous
operatic prima donna.. Mme. Garden,
who is noted also as an operatic di-
rector, has never been heard in Ann
Arbor before.
Mischa Elman, violinist, whose suc-
cess here several years ago was lit-
tle short of sensational, will open the
concerts in October. They will be
closed in March by a unique enter-
tainment in the form of a two-piano
recital by Guy Maier and Lee Patti-
son, who have achieved great success
in this form of music.
"Impresario" to e Heard
Two unique attractions will be the
Ukrainian national chorus and the
presentation of Mozart's "Impresario."
The former, consisting of 40 voices, is
being brought to this country after a
tour of 14 countries, where it has been
acclaimed as being of great excel-
lence. The chorus will be assisted by
Mile. Oda Slobodskaya, of the Impe-
rial opera, Petrograd, and Mme. Nina
Koshetz, who made a spectacular suc-
ces last season in the Metropolitan
Opera company.
Mozart's opera, under the direction
of William Wade Henshaw, is one of
the few operas which can be produc-
(Continued on Page Four)
MICHIGAN CENTRAL I WILL NOT
RUN SPECIAL STUDENT TRAINS
No special trains will be operated
by the Michigan Central line for
Summer session students at the close
of school. It has not been the policy

of the road, say officials, to run spe-
cial trains at the end of the Summer
term, as the number of students go-
ing to any one place has never been
large enough to make it worth while.
Special service is given during the
Christmas and Easter holidays and at
the close of the regular session.

HOPWOOD'S
SCORING

PLAYS
SUCCESS

'IRISH CLIP TEN
ATLANTIC CABLES

Dramatic critics have agreed that
"Why Men Leaver Home," the latest
comedy written by Avery Hopwood,
'05, is by far the best play that its au-
thor has ever produced. Hopwood is a
Michigan graduate and since his grad-
uation has produced a number of pop-
ular plays including "Fair and Warm-
er," "Double Exposure," and "The Gold
Diggers."
"ThesBat," which is declared to be
the greatest mystery play ever pro-
duced, was written by Hopwood in col-
laboration with Mary Roberts Rine-
hart. This play is now completing the
second full year of its run at the Mor-
osco theater, New York. Six travelling
companies presented "The Bat" last
year in a sensational tour of the coun-
try. It is now in its eighth month in
London. This is a longer run than any
other American play has ever had in
that city.
STUDENT ACTORS'
PERFORMTONIGHT
Play Production Classes to Present
Zangwil's "Melting Pot"
Tonight
WILL OFFER SHERIDAN'S "THE
RIVALS" TOMORROW NIGHT
Play production classes, under the
direction of Prof. R. D. T. Hollister,
will give the first of their two sum-
mer productions at 8 o'clock tonight in
University hall auditorium.
The cast for this evening's perform-
ance, "The Melting Pot" (Zangwill),
is composed of instructors and stu-
dents from other mid-western colleges
as well as Michigan talent which has
appeared in previous plays directed by
Professor Hollister.
Zangwill's drama first achieved its
fame in book form, to become better
known both to readers and theater
goers after its dramatization. Mem-
bers of the cast for the play have been
rehearsing on the finer points of th
drama for several weeks, and the
director is satisfied that the produc-
tion will be one of unusal merit.,
Costumes, lighting effects, and scen-
ery have been created especially for
both productions.
Sheridan's "The Rvals" will be giv-
en tomorrow evening at 8 o'clock in
University hall auditorium. Tickets
for both performances are on sale at
Wahr's bookstore.
INDIANA MINERS
BERATE GOVENOR
(By Associated Press)
Terre Haute, Ind., Aug. 9.--Impeach-
ment for Gov. Warren T. McCray for
his action in sending troops into the
coal fields here was demanded by a
mass meeting of striking miners and
union labor men here this afternoon
following a demonstration on the
streets when more than 4,000 men
staged a protest parade.
The parade was made up of min-
ers, striking railway shopmen and
members of unions not on strike. Ban-
ners denouncing the governor; mine
operators and railroad executives
were carried in the parade.
H. C. L. Causes Strike in Lisboni
Lisbon-A general strike is in effect
against the new cereal laws and rise
in cost of bread. The Chamber of

Deputies has approved suspension of.
constitutional guarantees for a fort-
night in an effort to limit the move-
ment.

World's System of Ocean Wires
Paralized; no News of Stock
Quotations

is

WESTERN UNION WILL NOT
i ASK ENGLAND'S ASSISTANCE
(By Associated Press)
London, Aug. 9.-Cable communica-
tion between Europe and the United
States today was at the mercy of the
Irish irregulars who were, in posses-
sion of ten of the 17 lines linking the
two continents.
Because of this partial paralysis of
the world's great arterial system ol
ocean wires, American readers were
denied their full quota of news of the
old world, as well as stock quotations
and private messages.
Under the present cabling condi-
tions Americans will find that news is
an expensive commodity, since a single
word, during the existing emergency
costs 25 cents which is nearly four
times the normal rate.
Neither the Western Union nor the
Commercial Cable company have made
any representation to the British gov-
ernment with a view to recovery of
their cables, officials believing the lines
can be best retrieved through peace-
ful diplomatic negotiations direct with
the Irish republicans. They fear that
any aggressive action on the part of
Great Britian would provoke the ir-
regulars to take vindicative measures
and destroy some plants.
RAUSPLEASED WITH
SUMMER CAMP WORK
"A fine spirt of work prevails among
the members of the engineering camp
and the biology station, according to
Dean Edward I. Kraus, of the Sumier
session, who returned Monday from a
three day visit to the camps on Doug-
hls lake.
It has been observed that the site
of the biology camp is not the most
desirable location on the lake. Ac-
cording to Dean Kraus the camp is ex-
posed to the prevailing winds and the
weathering action along the shore
makes the location less .desirable
than other unexposed points. Hope
was expressed by Dean Kraus that the
camp might be moved to Grapevine
point, on the opposite side of the bay,
at some future date.
Seventy-three men, all of whom are
University students, are members of
the second term of the engineering
camp. The biology station has 31
members, many of whom are students
and graduates of other universities.
AMERICAN DAVIS
CUP TEAM PICKED
New York, Aug. 9.-The Davis Cup
committee of the United States Lawn
Tennis association late today named
William T. Tilden, II, Philadelphia,
William M. Johnston, San Francisco,
Vincent Richards, Yonkers and R. Nor-
ris Williams, II, Boston as the team
which will defend the historic cup in
challenge round at Forest iHls, Sept.;
1, 2 and 3.
The committee announced that it had,
reached no decision as to combina-
tions for singles and doubles play and
that this point probably would not be
decided until within 24 hours of the
challenging round match.
Farm Bureau to Hold Picnic
The Oakland County Farm bureau
will hold its annual farmers' picnic at
Maceday lake, near here, Aug. 15. A!
large sport program has been arrang-;
ed.

100 FACULTY MEN
IN NEW WHO'S WHO
Ann Arbor is represented by 115
names in the 1922-1923 issue of "Who's
Who in America," which has just been
published, thus ranking second in the
state, and among the first for cities
of its size, in the number of notables
listed.
This is due to the fact that the Uni-
versity Is situated here. One hundred
of the names recorded are those of
members of the faculty, although
David Friday, now president of Michi-
gan Agricultural college, and the
late Prof. W. W. Beman are still in-
cluded on the list.
0BOAK INTERPRETS
KELSEY'S PPYRUS
Manuscripts Were First Discovered by
Peasants Excavating for
Nitrates
MARRIAGES AND LOANS ALL
RECORDED ON OLD DOCUMENTS
Papyrus manuscripts of the collec-
tion obtained for the University by
Prof. Francis W. Kelsey, of the Latin
department, .were interpreted by Prof.
A. E. Boak, of the history department,
in a lecture yesterday afternoon.
Professor Boak stated that the ex-1
planation for the preservation of docu-
ments written on such perishableE
material is that with the abandonment1
of the Roman-Egyptian villiages, rub-
bish from the office buildings was cov-
ered with hot sand of the desert area.
Owing to the dryness to which the rec-
ords were subject, they did not rot but
have come down to the present day
very little altered.
Found by Peasants
It was due to the need for nitrates
during the late war that many of thesea
papers were unearthed. Peasants who,
were 'doing the excavation came upon
these documents as well as many other
relics of ancient Egyptian life, all of
which they sold to dealers of the vicin-
ity. When found, the papyrus manu-
scripts were in close rolls and cover-
ed with layers of earth.
The particular roll from which Pro-
fessor Boak has been able to unravel
most of the story of the village life of
that day is more than seven feet long.
And it is thought that the original roll
was about two feet longer. The con-
tents of this document are contractsi
in the offices of two of these Egyptian7
villages at the time when they wereI
under Roman rule.-
The law at the time made it neces-
sary that all contracts be registeredI
and this roll is for the year extending
from March 30, 42 A.D., to August 30,
43 A.D. At present this is the only
specimen of this type discovered.
Used for Legal Purposes E
Slides were shown of this record rollt
and also of other contracts that Pro-
fessor Kelsey collected more than a
year ago. Some of these were agree-i
ments having to do with sale of prop-I
erty, the division of an estate, loans,
and special forms of the marriage,
agreement.I
Professor Boak discussed the people1
who went to make up these villages as
they are 'revealed through the names1
appearing on the documents. As the
native Egyptians were compelled un-
der Roman rule to keep their own
names, the papyrus collections showi
evidence of the mingling of races inc
The second and first centuries, B.C.1

Japan Goes Slow With China
Tokio--Japan is proceeding warily
in preliminaries to the negotiations
with the Chinese government. Japan
presupposes an attempt by the sovietsf
to draw her into a general agreement,t
such as the soviets concluded with!
Germany.E

L A S T EXCURSION
TO INCLUDE BOB-LO
AND DETROIT BANK
1ob-Lo island and the new First
National bank building of Detroit, will
be the points to be visited this Satur-
day on the last of the series of excur-
sions which the University has been
giving during the Summer session.
Leaving Ann Arbor at 8 o'clock the
party will go immediately to the bank,
which is on the site previously oc-
cupied by the Ponchartrain hotel. Spe-
cial guides will take the party through
the building and will explain the var-
ious functions, me.thods and problems
connected with this bank. Luncheon
will be served to members of the party
in the private dining rooms of the
hotel.
After lunch the party will take the
boat to Bob-Lo island, a place made
famous in early American history. Per-
sons in charge of the trip announce
that while the dinner may be procured
at the island it will be advisable for
the party to bring a picnic dinner with
them.
Names of persons desiring to make
this trip must be in room 8 of Uni-
versity hall by 6 o'clock tomorrow aft-
ernoon.
PADDOCK BEATS GUN, IS
CHARGE OF HAWAINS
,(By Associated Press)
Honolulu, T. H., Aug. 9.-That
Charles Paddock, sprint marvel of
Los Angeles, would be liable to dis-
qualification by the National A. A. C.
if the Hawaiian A. A. U. sent an of-
cial report on his time made during
competition in the islands last April,
was the basis of the local body's re-
fusal last night to comply with a re-
quest to that effect made by Robert
Weaver, president of the Southern
Pacific A. A. U.
Ran Unsanctioned Races
The Hawaiian record committee in-
formed the Hawaiian A. A. U. that
Paddock had beaten the gun in his
Honolulu races, that he ran in an un-
sanctioned meet against three unreg-
istered sprinters on the island to
Maui, T. H1., where he also performed,
the committee said, on a track which
did not conform to regulations and
ran over unrecognized distances.
The report on Paddock's time ask-
ed for by Weaver was for distances
from 100 yards to a furlong. The
runner's best time in the disputed
race was nine and three-fifths seconds
for the hundred yards, which equaled
his own former mark.
The Hawaiian A- A. U. upheld the
record committee's refusal to trans-
mit a report on Paddock's time to the
National body;
KENT TO LEAVE TO ACCEPT
PROFESSORSHIP AT KANSAS
C. V. Kent, of the physics depart-
ment, who has accepted the position
of assistant professor of physics at the'
University of Kansas, will leave the
city immediately after the Summer
session closes to take up his duties
wth that university.
Dr. Kent has been on the physics
staff of the University since securing
the degree of Ph.D. here in 1915, with
the exception of a period during the
war during which he served the gov-
ernment as pyrometer expert.

OPTIMISM REIGNS IN COAL FIELDS
AS PROBABILITY OF SETTLEMENT
OF STRIKE FOLLOWS CONFERENCE

OPERATORS AND MINERS WORK-
ING ON FINAL ARBITRA-
TION PLANS
OWNERS INDICATE THEY
ARE WILLING TO SETTLE
Mine Executives Say Union Demands
for New Wage Scale Are
Agreeable
(By Associated Press)
Cleveland, Aug. 9.-Virtual decision
was reached today by union leaders to
conclude a settlement of the soft coal
strike with the operators who have
gathered here for the joint peace con-
ference.
The operators also were expectant
of an agreement affecting all mines
in Ohio and others scattered in Il-
nois, Indiana and Pennsylvania.
Conunittee las First Say
Final decision on a settlement rests
with the union's policy committee and
its members have been informed that
John L. Lewis, union president, had
assurances from operators outside the
four states, of their willingness to
reach an agreement based on one ne-
gotiated at the conference here.
Mr. Lewis declined to comment on
messages he had received from opera-
tors in other states, but these were
discussed by him with other interna
tional officers of the union, including
members of the executive board.
The messages were understood to
have come from Iowa, Kansa, Mis-
souri, Oklahoma and Michigan.
No Official Word Given
The only formal indication of the
union's attitude expressed by Mr.
Lewis was a statement that the con-
ference with the operators, who came
here in response to his invitation to
negotiate a wage contract, would meet
according to schedule, and proceed
with its busines..
No official poll had been taken of
the coal production controlled by the
operators gathered here, but they
were said to be Willing to concede
the union's demands for re-establish-
ment of the wage scale that prevailed
in the contract that expired April 1,
which date marked the beginning of
the strike.
The plan for a settlement on a na-
tional basis went into the discard
when the Indiana operators' scale
committee refused to attend the con-
ference here, coupled with a delay of
a decision by the Illinois operators'
committee, and the non-appearance of
operators from other states. As a re-
sult, the conference had turned back
to its original purpose of negotiating
a partial settlement affecting four
states.
Men Optimistic
The union's tactics in th'e negotia-
tions were considered today by its
general policy committee of 128 mem-
bers, headed by President John L.
Lewis; but a formal decision on
whether to make a basic wage agree-
ment, affecting scattered mines in the
(Continued on Page Four)
Cuba Plans Financial Program
Havana, Aug. 9.-Consideration of
an emergency financial program was
contined by President Alfredo Zayas,
Maj.-Gen. Enoch H. Crowder, Manuel
Despagne, secretary of the treasury,
and a commission from both houses
of congress. Confidence that a form-
ula agreeable to congress will be
agreed upon is expressed. Gen. Crow-
der suggested a foreign loan to liquid-
ate this floating debt and shakeup in
the judiciary to bring treasury and
bank looters to trial,

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"The Melting Pot" THURS.
"T i al "FRIDAYE
AT EIGHT P. M., UNIVERSITY HALL
TICKETS AT WAHR'S RESERVED 75c, GENERAL 50c
- l-

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