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August 09, 1922 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-08-09

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PAGE TWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 9, 1922

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OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER SESSION OF
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Summer
Session by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for re-
publication of all news dispatches credited to it or otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
Moss matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $i.o
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signa-
ture not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of faith,
and notices of events will be published in The Summer Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Summer Daily
office. Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No
manuscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Summer Daily does not necessarily endorse the senti-
ments expressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR ................LEO J. HERSHDORFER
City Editor...........................--James B. Young
Night E4itors--
Howard A. Donahue Julian E. Mack
W. B. Butler
Women's Editor ..............................Dorothy Bennetts
Editorial Board..................Herbert S. Case, Ellen Nylund
Humor Editor..................................Donald Coney
Literary Editor...................................G. D. Eaton
Assistants

Portia Goulder
Janet Menges

C. R. Trotter
Thelma Andrews

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER ...................HEROLD C. HUNT
Advertising.............................Townsend H. Wolfe
Publication..........................aGeorge W. Rockwood
Accounts ................................Laurence I. Favrot
Circulation............................. . . Edward F. donlin
Assistants

Philip H. Goldsmith

Katherine E. Styer

Alma E. Young
WWDNESDAY, AUGUST 9, 1922
Night Editor-HOWARD A. DONAH:UE
Assist-W. Bernard Butler
STOPPING THE WILD ONES
Traffic conditions in Ann Arbor can only be crit-
icised favorably, but such is not the case on the
roads leading to Whitmore Lake and Ypsilanti.
Some suggestion has been made to have these high-
ways policed, but as yet nothing has been done.
Speeding has its thrills and excitement, and may
be all right on a race track, but it has no place on
a public highway. Its the old, old story that will
forever bear repeating, that there is little punish-
ment too harsh for the fool who willingly endangers
the lives of others-others who do not care to leave
this world so soon. Equal rights exist as long as
one does not take advantage of these rights to im-
peril the welfare of others. But there are auto-
maniacs, especially prevalent on the Whitmore bake
road, who show utter disregard for their fellow
antoists. Sometimes this lack of regard is brought
about by intoxication, and is made still more dang-
erous. At any rate reckless driving is not fair to
the other party, and if only as a duty to the peo-
ple of Ann Arbor the police department should use
stringent methods to see that it is discontinued.
WHAT'S THE MATTER, Y. M. C. A.?
There are certain organizations from which is
expected fullest amount of service because they are
run ostensibly for the benefit of the people. But it
seems that at times there is a show of doing things
without the actual substance. Such is the case of
the women's swimming classes at the Y. M. C. A.
which were started at the beginning of the Summer
session. In spite of frequent complaints no changes
in, the management of the classes have been made,
and those who signed up for the classes in hopes
that they might spend their time and money to
good advantage in taking instructions find that prac-
tically no instructions are given.
Those who institute such classes and advertise for
patronage should see to it that the purpose for
which these are started should be fulfilled, or they
should at least look into the matter when complaint
is made. Certainly the class is not functioning prop-
erly when the members are given the' use of the
pool but no directions. If swimming is learned by
getting into the water it does not seem sensible that
any one should pay for a convenience which is an
inconvenience in that it comes in the evening, for
there are other places nearer at hand where at any
time one can get into the water-if that is the only
thing necessary to learning to swim. It seems that
what is needed more than all else in some organiza-
tions is the guidance of conscientious directors.
THE AMERICAN HIGH SCHOOL
The report of the University committee having
to do with the share of the preparatory schools in
the responsibility for the failure of freshmen is in-
teresting, for if the constructive findings of the re-
port are observed, high schools will have to undergo
a very decided change. The report suggests that
students should be given disciplinary mental train-
ing which will equip them to read intelligently, get-
ting the thought from the printed page clearly and
accurately; to read rapidly, to get the dominent
ideas presented and to make intelligent notes on
reading; to think clearly and logically, keeping at-
tention on the real issue; to memorize essentials;
to work independently after preliminary instruc-

tions are given, thus showing evidence of initiative;
and to be able to use ordinary methods of securing
information: The table of contents, the encyclo-
pedia, and so forth. It is rather a good thing that
,these are only suggestions, for most of them are
foreign to the average high school, and were they
compulsary, high school systems would have to un-
dergo a decided change if they wished to prepare
their students for Michigan.
The average high school of today is pretty much
of a miss so far as the right kind of education is con-
cerned. The reason for this is largely because of
the type of teachers that they employ. The high
school teacher is not as a rule an overly intelligent
animal. They are usually too young to have serious
thoughts of their own or are too old to have the
courage of their convictions and are afraid to ad-
vance any ideas other that those drilled into them
at college or normal school. The average teacher's
mind is an atom of brain surrounded by a sea of
habit. There are exceptions.
Of course college has by no means reached the
ideal, but there is too great a jump from the prepar-
atory school to the university, for the methods of
instruction used in these institutions lack too much
in common.
The systems and standards pf education used by
universities are far from perfect, yet they are
closer to perfection than those used in high schools,
and one of the easiest methods by which high schools
can improve their systems and standards, and make
it much less difficult for their graduates to succeedl
in advanced education would be for them to in-
corporate in their methods just such suggestions as
are offered in the report made by this University
committee.
....... ....................... ..........................................
THE FRYING PAN
"-a flash in the Pan."
s.M....,. r....................... . . .... .. . . . ..............
IN L;ARLY MORN
Have you ever passed in fragant morn
On your way to early chow,
In the dan's first gleam
The gray mule team
That drags the garbage scow?
You can smell the smell of roses born;
And the scent of new-mliown hay,
'Iil, with odorous row,
Comes the garbage scow-
And it packs a mean bouquet!
smiln' appreciatively at the bun mutt he was
goin' t' hand us gratis, he says: "This humor busi-
ness is a pretty serious proposition, what ?" Aw, fer
a slug of gin, we'd chuck the job and join the cos-
mopolitan crew of bus-boys at the Tap Room.
A fair damsel is sitting in the window-seat. "Oh,
Dorothy," she calls, "if you're going. out will you
get me a package of Lorna Doone's?"
"Yes dear," comes the reply.
An hour elapses. Dorothy returns sans "Lorna
Doone's." "Say !" she says. "What kind of cigar-
ettes did you want? I asked in every drugstore
on State street and they didn't have 'em."
Today's Feiuilleton
I
"Very Well," said Aylmer Spuzz the all-Amer-
ican stem-winding detective. "Tell the sheriff I
will be out in half an hour. At present I am work-
ing on a case and cannot be inturrupted."
So saying he turned and retired to his inner of-
Jice where he closed the case and locked it into
the cellarette. "One can't be too careful nowadays
with so many revenoors around," he murmured.
He slipped a IBrowning machine gun into his
pocket and passed out.
II
The cell was dark when he arrived. All was sil-
ent. A gold tooth gleamed in the darkness. It was
the sheriff. Spuzz smiled. It lit up the cell.
"Halbert the Prune has escaped," said the gov-

ernor. "We can't dope it."
"You couldn't," comes back Spuzz, sneering with
his lip.
"Well," seys the lord chief justice, "the bars is
broke off our new jail-how'd he do it?"
"Simple," replies Aylmer Spuzz, the world's
greatest three-ring detective, picking up a bouquet
of simple country flowers from the floor. "Simple.
Some body snuck a buch of golden-rod into his cell
and, having hay-fever, he sneezed the bars off'n
tle cell window !"
"Two dollars and twenty-five cents was the re-
ward safe breakers received for their work in two
places here last night."
Aha, "The Triumph of the Yegg !"
we were being chesterfieldian
(not an advt.)
but just like a page outa
the old etiquetterie
and we said
(to her, we said)
sweets to the sweet
(we did)
tut she said
(blast her hazel eyes)
thank you
may I pass you the nuts.
The Question of the Day
"When do ya have yer exams "
CALIGULA.

GRAHAM'S
Both Stores

DETROIT UNITED LINES
TIME TABLE
Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Car-6 :oo
a. ., 7:00 a. M., 8:oo a. in.. o:oo a. m. and
hourly to 9 :o5 p. mn.
Jackson Express Cars (local stop. of Ann
Arbor)-9 :47 a. in. and every two hours to
9:47 p. m.
Local Cars, East Bound- :55 a. m., 7:oo
a. mn. and every two hours to 9 :oe p.,in.;
ii :oo p. n. To Ypsilanti only-i:40 p. n.,
T2:25 a. m., 1:15 a. m.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars, West Bound-7:5o a. M., 2:40
p. in.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo- Limited cars:
8:47, 10-47, a. in.; 12:47, 2:47, 4:47 P. im.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited: 8:47
P. in.
YOU WILL FIND THE
Farmers
and Mechanics Bank
A pleasant, conven-
ient and SAFE place
to transact your
business.
TWO OFFICES:
101-105 South Main St.
330 South State St.
Nickels' Arcade
Member of the Federal Reserve

SHOOT THE CHUTES
G RO OME'S
BATHING BEACH
WHITMORE LAKE

Free Picnic Grove

Lunches at "Van's"

m

Are You Driving Home?
If so, let us look your car over before
you leave. We do expert repairing
at a reasonable price, and make a
specialty of catering to students.
Quick and Good Work
LICH TY GARAGE
Cor. Fifth Ave. and Catherine St.

___ __ ___ __ ___ _ __ ___ __ ___ __ _

For Your Summer Reading
BOOKS
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For the
Camping
A few suggestions that will
add to your comfort-
Folding Stools, Folding
Cots, Folding Tables,
Camp Cook Stoves.

to Tent and insure your complete enjoyment
while on the road.

Te

nts Rental Prices per week
9x9 $3.50 10x12 $4.00
14x24 $10.50 16x24 $13.00

12x14
18x24

$5.50
$14.00

:XTILE COMPANY
Phone 91 Ypsilanti, Michigan

1m

Ann Arbor
Savings Bank
Two Offices:
N. W. Corner Main and Huron St
707 N. University Ave.

t

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8

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..1

... NJ

t o - W-
Daily Service
to PUT-IN-BAY
and SANDUSKY.00
(On the Big Steamer Put-in-Bay)
Finest exclusive Excursion Steamer, Largest Ball p
Room, Finzel's Orchestra. No extra charge for danc-
ing. Steamers leave on Eastern Time.
Every day from Detroit at 9:00 a. m. for
Put-In-Bay-Connecting with Cleveland and
Buffalo Transit Co., and Steamer Arrow for
Middle Bass, Kelley's Island and Lakeside.
Sandusky-Connecting with Railroads and Suburban Lines, Fare $1.40
Cedar Point-15min,.byferry from Sandusky, Fare including ferry,.1.65
Excursion fares, (returning same day)
Put-In-Bap, week day, 80c; Sundays. Holidays,$1.15 Round trip.
Sandusky, every day, $2.00 Round trip.
Four hoursat Put-n-Bay; Bathing, visit the Caves, Perry's Monument.
Pavilion, Groves, Dancing and many other attractions, several Hotels.
Cedar Point-Fresh water rival to Atlantic City; Large Hotels, Board Walk,
Thousands bathe here daily.
Returning: Leave Cedar Point by Ferry for Sandusky. Leave Sandusky
from Big Four Dock 2:30 n. m. Put-In-Bay 4:30 p. m. Arr. in Detroit 8:00 p. mn.
Dancing Moonlights. Leave Ashley & Dustin Steamer Line '
Detroit 8:45p.m. Fare Wed,
& Thurs.60c Sat.& Sun.75c. Foot of First St. Detroit, Mich.
Write for map folder

A fact-
The Arcade Cafete-
ria-maintains a sum-
mer time- menu ad-
mirably suited to
this time of year.
The ARCADE
CA FE TE RIA

Upstairs i n

Nickels A r c a d e

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