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August 09, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-08-09

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I

C, 14 p

#ummr

THE WEATHER
GENERAL Y A
TII)NY

itF k

:43 a tl

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

i

VOL. XIII. No. 41

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 9, 1922

PRICE FIVE CENTS

H R ING

SEEKS

AID

OF

CONGRESS

COL CONFERENCE
MAKES DEFINITE
SETTLEMENT PLAN
RE-EST.ABLI1ISIt11 ,NN OF WAG F
CONF TU('T BE FOlFT -
PART OF PIROGR.AN
INDIANA OPERATORS
TURN DOWN B I DS
Believe Consideration of New Terms
Will Open the
Fields
(By Associated Press)
Cleveland, Aug. 8.--With a definite
program for ending the soft coal
strike read for consideration tomor-
row, the joint conference of the lead-
ers of the striking union miners and
coal operators today awaited expect-
ed arrival of other operators, espe-
cially those of Illinois and Indiana.
Re-establish Contraets
In brief, the program for settle-
ment calledtfor re-establishment of
the wage contracts that expired last
March 31, the eve of the beginning of
the tie-up, and also creation of an
advisory commission of inquiry
through whose influence it was ex-
pected that disputes would be settled
without strikes.
Terre Taute,. Ind.. Aug. 8.--The In-
diana bituminous coal operators asso-
ciation will not attend the Cleveland
conference called by John L. Lewis,
president of the united mine workers'
association, it was announced follow-
ing a meeting' of the scale committee
here today.
Turns Down Bid
A. M. Ogle, president of the national
coal association, who also is an In-
diana operator, said he would not gof
to Cleveland and in a statement de-!
clared that hope of a settlement at
Cleveland had been "diminished if not
killed by undue publicity."
COSTUMES AND SCERYS

PRESIDENT ASKS THAT HOUSE AND
SENATE HOLD CONTINUOUS SESSION;
UNION LEADERS GATHER IN CAPITAL

ACTION INDICATES GOVERNMENT
MAY TAKE DRASTIC STEPS
FOR SETTLEMENT
REJECT HARDING'S PLAN,
S A Y SHOP EMPLOYEES

Southern
Down

Railway Workers Turn
All Offers for Ending
of Walkout

TWO VIEWS OF THE PROPOSED NEW LAW DORMITORY AND CLUB, WHICH IS THE GIFT OF A GRAD-
UATE OF THE LAW SCHOOL. IT IS EXPECTED THAT WORK ON THE NEW BUILDING MAY
BEGIN THIS WINTER OR EARLY NEXT SPRING.

NEW- LAW DORMITORY TO HOUSE 150
MEN; WILL PROVIDE RESEARCH FUND

Expect Property for Site to be Ac.
quired for Construction In
Winter or Spring
ALL LAW STUDENTS ELIGIBLE
FOR MEMBERSHIP IN CLUB
Although all of the site for the pro-
posed new Lawyers' club has not been
secured, it is expected that the prop-
erty will be in the possession of the
University soon in order that the
building may be started during the
coming winter or next spring at the
latest .
The structure will be a combined
club and dormitory building to be
located on South University avenue
between State street and Tappan ave-
nue. This provides for the headquart-
ers for a club to be organized and

Final details are being arranged for made up of graduates of the Law
the plays which are to be put on by school and of other lawyers who may
the class in play production under
the direction of Prof. R. D. T. Hollister be selected to membership, and of stu-
tomorrow and Friday evenings in Un- dents in the Law school.
iversity hall auditorium. The dress Plans of the building include bed-
--I------ -" 4p., « t '4, " ,.z - 11 -

viously connected with the University
or not, shall be eligible to member-
ship, subject to being elected by the
governors.. .
"All dues and all profit from the
operation of the building shall be
used exclusively for legal research
work, to be expended from time to
time as the governors may deem best.
This legal research work will render
possible the study of comparative jur-
isprudence and legislation, national
and state, and also of foreign coun-
tries, 'ancient and modern. Such work
should be of use in proposed legisla-
tion, and besides leading to the pro-
duction of reliable law treatises and
studies, would help to systematize the
law as a science.
Commends European Plan
"The European plan of giving leis-
ure time to professors to pursue their
studies and produce original works,
may well be applied in America to
professors of law, who at present are
absorbed too exclusively in class room
work. A legal research fund could be
used to pay part of their salaries, thus
giving them time for original research.
"The character of the legal pro-
fession depends largely upon the char-
acter of the law schools. Real lawyers
were never needed more than now and
they have grave responsibilities. There
never was a time when they had so
much power as now. It will be for
the lawyers to hold this great republic
together, without sacrifice of its dem-
ocratic institutions."
Plans Made
Plans for the building have been
made by Ydrk and Sawyer, of New
York City. Sketches of the building
show it to be of beautiful Gothic de-
sign with great care exercised as to
harmony with nearby buildings and
the future new Law school building.
The University authorities and the
faculty of the Law school have ex-
pressed their belief that the donor has
shown real vision and a deep appre-
ciation of the problems of the legal
education and the law, in making the
provision for the gradual accumula-
tion of a fund for legal research, as
stated in his letter. This plan is likely
to mark the beginning of a great
epoch in education and research in
this country .

CONDITIONS RECOGNITION
GUARANTEE OF SAFETY
TO AMERICANS

.ONI

STUDENTS TO TOUR
DRUG PLANT TODAY
Students will visit the extensive lab-
oratories of Park, Davis and company,
Detroit, manufacturers of pharmaceu-
tical supplies, this afternoon, under
the direction of Mr. Carlton Wells, di-
rector of excursions. The party will
leave the Packard and State street
station of the D. U. R. railway at 1
o'clock and arrive at the laboratories
at 3 o'clock.
Special guides will conduct the visit-
ors through the main departments of
the industry.
PROTECT U.S CITIZENS
HUGHES WARNS MEXICO

(By Associated Press)
Washington, Aug. 8. - President
Harding has asked congressional lead-
ers, in view of the menacing indust-
rial situation arising from coal and
rail strikes, to hold the house, now in
recess, continuously in session, along
with the senate, after the house re-
convenes next Tuesday.
The prospect was that, failing furth-
er settlement possibilities of the labor
controversies, the administration
might call for legislative action to
enable the government to cope with
conditions which thus far have failed
to react favorably to efforts on the
part of the executives.
Leaders to Confer
Meanwhile, the leaders of all union
organizations in the railroad field be-
gan to gather in Washington for con-
ferences to determine the response
which shall be made to President
Hardings's latest offer.
B. M. Jewell, chairman of the group
of officers of the striking unions, de-
clared that he had received hundreds
of telegrams today from locals of the
shop craft "telling us to reject the
President's offer, and not a single one
asking its acceptance."
Separate conferences between tae
Southern railway officialssand repre-
sentatives of the striking shopmen on
its lines broke up finally today, when
the men declared that only a national
settlement of the strike could be ac-
cepted by them, even though the rail-
road conceded seniority rights to re-
turning strikers.
Hint at Federal Control
Suggestions were advanced that con-
gress might be asked to authorize re-
sumption of federal control over the
railroad systems should Harding find
it impossible to terminate the strike
satisfactorily with the further possi-
bility that direct legislation amending
the transportation act might be sought
to make the railroad labor board in
wage matters binding upon manage-
ments and employees.
EXAM SCHEDULES
READY SATURDAY
Schedules for the final examinations
in all schools of the Summer session
are now being printed, and will be
out Saturday morning, according to
advice from the Summer session office.
The schedule is exactly like the one in
the summer catalogue, being the same
for the College of Literature, Science,
and the Arts, Colleges of Engineering
and Architecture, the School of Educa-
tion and the Graduate school.
The Summer session will officially
end at 6 o'clock, Friday, Aug. 18.
Classes being continued up to Wed-
nesday noon of that week. As soon as
papers are corrected and the required
reports are handed into the dean's of-
fice, standing will be mailed to stu-
(Continued on Page Four)

rehearsal for "The Rivals which will!
be given on Friday evening will he
held this evening. It is anticipated by
Professor Hollister that the play will'
be done with a finesse not customary
in the usual amateur production.
Staging effects have been construct-
ed under the supervision of the direct-
or. A curtain cyclorama has been ar-
ranged at the rear of the stage whichj
will give the effect of depth and ex-

WILL TAKE ROADS YEAR TO GET
EQUIPMENT BACK INTO
CONDITION
Cl AIM STRIKE BREAKERS
A R E HIRED IN EUROPE
Craft Officials Will Not Reply to the
President's Proposal Until
Friday's Conference
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Aug. 8.-Giving out
figures of the condition of railroad
equipment, Mr. Johnston, president of
the mechanics association, said it
"would take the railroads a year to get
their equipment back into shape, if the
strike should stop right now."
C. and 0. Road Cited
They further charged that strike-
breakers were being "hired in Eu-
rope, particularly England, by some
of the railroads, naming the Chesa-
peake and Ohio as one such road.
"We found at Huntington, W. Va.,
men who have been brought over for
the purpose," Mr. Johnston asserted,
"and we have cabled British labor or-
ganizations, asking them to spread the
knowledge of these American adver-
tisements and intend also to cite the
cases to the immigration authorities
of violation of the contract labor
laws."
Union Chiefs Meet Today
Arrangements were made for the
heads of the seven striking unions to
meet with Mr. Jewell tomorrow.
Though the President's final proposal
for strike settlement was addressed
directly to them, it was understood
they would withhold their final reply
to it until Friday, when officials of the
four brotherhoods of train service
emplpyes, the switchmen and tele-
graphers will hold joint conferences
with the shopcraft. Warren S. Stone,
chief of engineers, has called the
brotherhood spokesmen in, Mr. Jew-
ell was assured, and the entire gather-
ing will consider the policy to be
adopted.
ROBRLAN SIES
LECTURE IN FRENCH
"Paris, Old and New," was the sub-
ject of a lecture in French by Prof.
E. E. Rovillain, of the romance lang-
uage department, in Natural Science
auditorium yesterday afternoon. Pro.
fessor Rovillain illustrated his talk,
which was delivered in French, with
scenes which had some historical or
sentimental interest attached to them.
Beginning with the buildings of the
middle ages, Professor Rovillain re-
counted an anecdote about each of
the photographs shown. Some of the
places are noW a mass of ruins, some
were destroyed during the war, some
have been restored and a few remain
in their entirety.
How the children of Paris prevent-
ed the Germans from marching under
the Arc de Triomphe in 1871, Marie
Antoinette's attempted escape from
prison, something of the life of the
patron saint of Paris and many other
tales of various kinds were told in
connection with the scenes usually
visited by the average sightseer.

rooms and studies for 150, men and a
dining hall to accommodate more than
300 students. It is known that the
donor of the gift is a graduate of the
College of Literature, Science, and the
Arts as well as the Law school, but
his name has been withheld.
Excerpts from the letter which he
sent to the Regents indicate the pur-
pose of the gift and some of the uses

(By Associated Press)
Mexico City, Aug. 8.-Mexico again
has been told by Chas. E. Hughes, the
American secretary of state, that Mex-
ico's accomplishments regarding guar-
antees for American properties and in-
terests must be more of deed's and less
of words if American recognition is
to be extended to Mexico, according
to Excelsior.
A communication to this effect, the
paper says, was delivered by George
T. Summerlin, the American charge
d'affaires, to Foreign Minister Pani
last Thursday, in answer to the Mex-
ican foreign office notes of May 4 and
24, in which it was asserted that Mex-
ico would provide the guarantees aim-
ed to be secured by a treaty of amity
and commerce and insisted upon by
the state department at Washington.
Excelsior asserts that it has reliable
knowledge of the communication,
which it describes as embodying
friendly insistence by Mr. Hughes that
recognition of Mexico must be preced-
ed by some written guarantee that
American holdings in Mexico are not
to be subject to confiscation.
Telegraph Head to Attend Parley
St. Louis, Mo., Aug. 8.-E. J. Man-
ion, president of the Order of Rail-
road telegraphers, said he would at-
tend the conference of railroad union
officials at Cleveland Friday.

parise. This devise will be used in for which the building is intended:
both "The Melting Pot" and "The Riv- "If agreeable to you, I will erect on
als." Several columns for use in "The the two blocks on South University
Melting Pot" have been built. Stag- avenue, between South State street
ing, costuming and lighting for these and Tappan avenue, a law students'
plays have been worked out by the combined club and dormitory building,
members of the class, each person with the same advantages as you
being allowed to take up the particu- have extended to other buildings,
lar phase of dramatics which inter- namely, the University to furnish free
ested him. Costumes for the plays heat, light and power.. . . .
have been secured from Bruesser com- All Law Students Eligible
pany, of Detroit. "All members of the Law school are
Tickets for the performances can be to be eligible for membershop in the
secured at Wahr's bookstore. Re- proposed club, subject to such condi-
served seats are still available, the tions as the club authorities may pre-
price being 75 cents, while general scribe. All lawyers, whether residing
admission is 50 cents. in the state or not, and whether pre-

iii nnn7ts n nun uan nnnII[fill mmmI I III I I I I I if I I III III III I 111111 Jill I [if 111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 [1111[);

play roduction Plays

"The Melting Pot" THURS.
"The Rivals FRIDAY _______
AT EIGHT P. M., UNIVERSITY HALL
TICKETS AT WAHR'5 RESERVED 76o, GENERAL SOc

Il

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