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August 08, 1922 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-08-08

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PAGE TWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

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OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER' SESSION OF
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Summer
Session by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for re-
publication of all news dispatches credited to it or otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Intered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
class matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $i.so.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2434.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signa-
ture not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of faith,
and notices of events will be published in The Summer Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Summer Daily
office. Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No
manuscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Summer Daily does not necessarily endorse the senti-
merits expressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR................LEO J. IERSHDORFER
City Editor................. .............James B. Young
Night Editors-
Howard A. Donahue Julian E. Mack
W. B. Butler
Women's Editor ................................Dorothy Bennetts
Editorial Board..................Herbert S. Case, ?llen NYlund
Humor Editor....... .......................Donald Coney
Literary Editor..................................G. D. Eaton
Assistants

Portia Goulder
Janet Menges

C. R. 'T'rotter
Thelma A"drews

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
SUSINESS MANAGER ...................IEROLD C. HUNT
Advertising.............................Townsend H. Wolfe
Publication.................. ..........George W. Rockwood
Accounts..............................Laurence 11. Favrot
Circulation................................. Edward F. Conlin
Assistants

THE JOLLY, JOLLY FACULTY
,Women students of the Summer sesion being
advised that the faculty were all friendly, in fact
desirous of kiowing their Students, sent invitations
to one hundred professors and instructors for a
reception that was given Sunday afternoon from
4 to 6 o'clock by the residents of Betsy Barbour
house. The girls dressed up themselves and the
house and stayed away from week end parties and
the river to receive their guests. The reception was
held despite the fact that less then twelve members
of the faculty were courteous enought to attend.
Most of these students are here just for the sum-
;ner and consequently will never have another op.
portunity of meeting the faculty of the University
personally.
. Of course it rained early in the afternoon, but
just twhat else kept the guests away will probably
never be quite understood by the students who leave
ichigah at the end of August.
THE CLASS IN PLAY PRODUCTION
In every student body there is always a certain
amount of talent, anu the most efficient way that a
University has of bringng this talent to the fore-
ground is to provide student activities. Thus it is
with Michigan.
Next Thursday and Friday the class is Play
Production is going to give two plavs-the Melting
Pot and The Rivals. In the casts for both of these
productions are men and women who are talented,
men and women who are not amateurs, but who
are experienced in acting and playwriting. There
will probably be just enough inexperienced actoring
in the plays to add a bit of extra spice to them, but
on the whole the class in Play Production is offer-
ing to the Summer session an exceptional Oppor-
tunity to witness a rather extraordinary display of
student talent,-an opportunity which it will be
well to take advantage of.
The celebrated German, Prof. Albert Einstein,
upon hearing that an attempt was about to be made
to assassinate him, packed up and fled the country,
refusing to return even at the request of the gov-
erniment. Which all goes to show-what? That
even the great have their weaknesses? Or that the
fear of God and death can be present even in the
most profoundly scientific mind.
The British say that th'ey will accept no Near
East peace settlement unless small countries are pro-
tected. England always was noted for her diplom-
acy.
Have you taken advantage of the summer trips?
......... ..................... - -. . -. - - .f ... .....
THE FRYING PAIN:
-a flash in the Pan."
....s. .flsuuN+.u. . ..... ..ii~i . .
GALLOlS-1 T11'
Fully fifty fathom deep lies lie,
Enshrouded by the thunderous sea;
A murderous son-of-a-gun.
He's not a pirate chieftain bold
Gone to his death in the ocean's hold-
HE "rocked the boat for fun."
"Hearing of the street car strike in Chicago, Yel-
low Cab drivers on vacation voluntarily hurried
back to the city and insisted on going to work,"
says an advertisement. Yeah, couldn't miss a chance
like that.
The advertisements were good today. Listen to
a foot-appliance bally-hoo, "One Good Foot in Sev-
en." At which rate only the centipede stands much
of a chance.
Nearly twelve members of the faculty attended
the faculty tea at Betsy Barbour Sunday. "Nearly"
because Dr. Lovell of the State street academy was

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DETR(IT UNITED LINES
TIATE TABLE
Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and express Cars-6 :oo
a. m., 7:00 a. m., 8:oo a. m., Q:oo a. m. and
hourly to 9 :05 p. m.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor)-g:47 a. m. and every two hours to
9:47 p. In.
LocalaCars, East Bound-5:5s a. m., 7:00
a. in. and every two hours to 9 :00 p.i.;
ii:oo p. n. To 'Ypsilanti only-11:4o p. n.,
12:25 a. 1n., 1:1s a. m.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars, West Bound-7:5o a. in., 2:40
P. in.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo- Limited cars:
8:47, 1o0:47, a. in.; 12:47, 2:47, 4:47 P. m.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited: 84.7
P. in.
F RATE RNITIES,
SORORITIES and
CLUBS ishing to buy
or rent, can have their
needs satisfied by call-
ing the ANN ARBOR
REALTY COMP'Y
Nat'l Bank Bldg. Phone 40

I

i.

TUTTLES

K

A place to bring your friends.
the food better; nowhere is
more prompt. Open all

Nowhere is
the service
summer.

TUTTLE'S LUNCH ROOM
MAYNARD STREET

I;

Summer Students-
Secure your supplies at
STUDENTS SUP LY STORE
1111 South University Avenue
Materials for All Colleges

B'OOKS
from
GR AHAM'S
Both Stores

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1922
9
13
20
27

II T
1
.7 8
21 22
28 29

AUGUST
W T
2 3
9 10
16 17
23 24
30 31

F
4
11
18
25

1922
S
12
19
26

I

Philip H. Goldsmith
A]

Katherine E. Styer
Umna r. Young

TUESDAY, AUGUST 8, 1922
Night Editor-JULIAN ELLIS MACK
Assistant-R. C. Trotter
GETTING WkHA'I IS GIVEN
A peculiar ithing about American students is
their lack of appreciation of the facilities for learn-
ing. It is a sort of pride with them to be able to
show contempt for marks and for studiousness, and
a desire on the part of large numbers of them for
a reputation of being a good bluffer. Nevertheless
although they mitigate any appearance of being
grinds they delight in dwelling upon the amount
of effort they put into their preparation for a blue
book or in exaggerating their labors in sporadic ef-
forts. It is not exactly an intention to be dishon-
est but it is rather an inherent hankering for the ad-
miration. Too often there is an expressed or at
least hinted suggestion of pity for the person who
shows signs of working ha'rd and of sympathy for
the poor grind who puts all his energies to study-
ing.
There is a certain amount of justification in taking
a sympathetic attitude toward an ordinary grind,
but that should not be because of their studying but
because of their missing of so many other things
that are really worth while. When John or Jane
say they spent all night studying for a blue book
for the following day, or when these same people
say they have done a tremendous amount of out-
side reading for a particular course, one feels quite
safe in discounting one-third of their remarks. It
may happen that this is simply a continuation of
that childhood's tendency to give rein to the imagin-
ation, but one is more inclined to think that it is a
wish to cause wonderment or admiration at one's
ability to get something without effort or to do an
extraordinary amount of work.
People are constantly disregarding the importance
of the work done in classrooms and at schools,
and they seem to believe that the purpose of any
study is to pass an examination after which what-
ever has been absorbed will be scrapped except as it
is needed in some corresponding subject. While it
s a psychological benefit to cram, that is not the most
beneficial method to employ when results are con-
sidered. Every branch of work has its fundament-
als and a thorough knowledge of these is absolutely
essential to an understanding of the'later steps. I?
the students of our colleges could be taught the im-
portance of the principle that one cannot get some-
thing without giving something thlere would be bet-
ter equipped people going out from the universities
.nd college to do their chosen work.
HATS OFF TO THE R. O. T. C.
Michigan's R. O. T. C. unit is deserving of much
praise for the progress that it has mude in the past
year. Michigan's friends could no help but feel
proud of the way their R. 0. T. C. uniit conducted
itself at the summer camps, where it was always
among the leaders despite the fact that it had no
mean competition to contend with
This fall two new members will be added to th
instructing staff of the department of Military Sci-
ence and Tactics, and the indications are that the
course will be bigger and better than ever. Major
Robert Arthur, the officer in charge, has done some
admirable work, and has built his department up
until now it is equal in quality to any in the coun-
try.

PANAMA AND. STRAW HATS f
CLEANED THE RIGHT WAY
Prices for cleaning Panamas $1.25 up.
Prices for stiff straws...... .75 up.
We do only high class work.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
Special Trips for Parties
New 18-Passenger Bus '
Round Trip to Bathing Beach, $z.
Sunday Schedule:
9 a. m. and every two hours
till 9 p. iii.
Special rates on Dance Parties
of io or more.
H. C. FRY BUS LINE. Phone 2754-R

If yourclothes are not be-
coming to you, you had
better be coming to us
Swissilized Garments Stay Clean Longer
PHONECleaning
PHONErnePressing
W CRepairing
Compn~yiPleating
"The Home of Energine"
209 South Fourth Avenue

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,present.
IBryan."

He gave an impromptu talk on "Me and

'0 A WORN-OUT TYPEWRITER RIBBON
Mute confidant, dumb servitor, now old and worn,
I lay thee by; and with a touch of sadness
Fill thy place with virgin spools.
Thy magic bared my thoughts; thy alchemy
Took up my dreams, and coined them, and with
A spendthrift largess, flung them before
A cloudy distant world.
VV'hen Sorrow stalked my mood, in thee there was
relief.
1When Anger saw a world awry, its tattoo broke
Its pent-up force on thee. Through thee,
Sympathy reached out and poured a healing balm
Upon the bruised heart of a friend.'
Through thee, there came, into a waiting soul,
Love's happy melody..
So now, thy task is done. Adieu; niy faithful friend.
G. D. [1.
"Fight Plan to Annex 'Hamtramck to Detroit."
Who-lamtramck or Detroit.
"Fish Jumps Into Boat, Angler Boldly Avers."
We thought the eighteenth amendment had put an
end to these stories.
He's So Dumb Ie Thinks That:
The court house is a wooing place.
The Gargoyle is the campus humorous magazine.
A typewriter ribbon is a stenog's hairbow.
CALIGULA.

VAN LU
PATENTED
the ffrldc Smartesi COLLAIj
T HE VAN HEUSEN Collar is the greatest innovation in
men's dress since the old, high, stiff-brimmed beaver
gave place to the modern, soft felt hat.
No other collar can compare with the VAN HEUSEN,
because no other collar is made from the same seamless fabric.
And men wear the VAN HEUSEN Collar for the same
reasons that they wear the soft felt hat: it is better looking
and more comfortable.
The trim dignity of the VAN HEUSEN is not starched
nor ironed into it, but woven and tailored into it.
The VAN HEUSEN Collar is as trim as a Tuxedo; as
stylish as it is starchless; and as correct as it is comfortable.
Men who scorned soft collars wear it and praise it. And
fastidious men men who like a slight sug-
gestion of the formal, or the severe, in
their attire - are fast friends of the VAN No
HEUSEN Collar.

lEdges

U

Nine styles and heights, quarter sizes from
13'2 to 18, price fifty cents. Will out-
wear a half-dozen ordinary collars.
If your dealer cannot supply you with
the VANHEUSENCollarandthe VAN
CRAFT Shirt (a soft white shirt with
the VAN HEUSEN Collar attached)
write us for address of one that can.

jWillNot Wrikle
L~i2'Not Wilt
avs YourShirts
,saves1,u
es s

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Cf i LEABit 122 y
-IILLIPS - JONES CORPORATION 1225 BROADWAY f' NEW YORK.

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