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August 08, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-08-08

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THE WEATHER

ulIh P

O'ummr

CONTINUED RAIN
TODAY

I Aifrl y n n

DII

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERICE

VOL. XIII. No. 40. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, AUGUST 8, 1922 PRICE FIVE CENTS

ALLIED HEADS LAY
SETTLEMENT BASIS.
FOR REPARATIONS

BRITISH GOVERNMENT NO LONGER AN
EMPIRE, BUT A. LEAGUE OF STATES
-PROF. ALLIN.

GERMAN PAY, KINDRED
UP TO PREMIERS FOR
CISIONS

ISSUES,I
DE-

Lt OYD GEORGE AND
POINCARE TO LEAD
No Announcement Made as to Course
of Procedure in Closed
Session
(By Associated Press)
London, Aug. 7.-Laying of the foun-
dation for the important work facing
the Allied governments in connection
with German reparations and kindred
problems was begun at a preliminary
meeting of the principal representa-
tives of these governments here to-
day.
No agenda for the conference, in
which Prime Minister Lloyd George
and Premier Poincare, of France, were
the principal participants, had been
prepared in advance, and one of the
first concerns of the initial meeting,
presided over by Mr. Lloyd eGorge,
was to decide the order in which the
various subjects would' be brought
forward.
The conference began its session
shortly before 11 o'clock, adjourning
at 1:15 p. in., to reassemble at 4:30.
No one aside from the delegates was
admitted to the session. A statement
from Sir Edward Grigg, the British
premier's private secretary, as to the
course the proceedings had taken was
at first promised for the early after-
noon, but later it was stated that an-
nouncement would not be forthcoming
until evening.
BRITISH MINER ASKS
REVISION OF TREATY
Frankfort-on-Main, Germany, Aug-
7.-Immediate revision and modifica-
tions of the Treaty of Versailles and
world-wide unity of labor to resist
"capitalistic politicians" and prevent
future wars were demanded here to-
day by Frank Hodges, secretary of
the British Federation of Miners, in
an address formally opening the con-
gress of the International Federation
of Miners. Mr. Hodges did not re-
fer to the coal strike in the United
States.
The veteran British labor leader's
words were received with thunderous
applause.
"War time promises to labor have
-been shattered," said Hodges. "The
capitalists are trying to destroy the
workers' hard won rights. In Great
Britain and in America these at-
tempts have been supported openly
by the governments. i
"We cannot have a member of the
civilized organizationof nations cut
off and the rest of the body continue
in perfect health. It is an elementary
truth that prosperous Germany and
Austria mean prosperous France and
Britain.
"The Treaty of Versailles must be
radically changed. Not hesitatingly
and in piecemeal, but radically and
immediately. Our statesmen begin to
realize that a colossal mistake has
been made."
Engine Trouble Forces Blake Down
Agra, British India, Aug. 7.-Maj.
W. T. Blake, the British aviator who
is attempting a round-the-world
flight, was forced to land here yes-
terday en route to Allahabad owing
to rain and engine trouble. Due to
repeated interruptions caused by mot-
or mishaps, he is trying to obtain a
new machine.

Recent tendencies in English polit-
ics toward guild socialism, the weak-
ening of the representative form of
government, the change of Britain
from an empire into an association
or league of states, the disappearance
of the liberal party, and the disin-
tegrating of the bouregoise class, said
Prof. Cephas D. Allin of the University
of Minnesota yesterday in Natural Sci-
ence auditorium, are due to the war-
time reactions and the incoming storm
of the Russian revolution.
Professor Allin remarked that to-
day Europe has become the new world
with radical ideas and that the Un-
ited States was the old world of strong
conservatism. Europe is torn between
the spirit of' revolution and attempts
to return to the condition of normalcy.
"Europe today," continued Professor
Allin, "is furnishing the ideas of the
world." In England the war has up-
sat men's economic and political
ideas."
England Constantly Changing
The speaker pointed out that more
changes have occurred in England
during the four years following the
war than in the previous four genera-
tions. At the first part of the war
England struggled to maintain her
own integrity, the neutrality of Bel-

College Audienes
Most Responsive,
Says Miss K earns
"If there is a difference between
college audiences and others, the dif-
ference is in favor of the former,"
said Elsie Herndon Kearns wvho plays
ed some of the leading women's parts
in the Shakespeare Playhouse company
productions here' Thursday, Friday,
and Saturday of last week. "They are
quicker, keener and more responsive.
It seems as though I were telling them
a new story, which is not always true
of the theater going crowds in cit-
ies," Miss Kearns continued.
"You know, I feel that I am going
home when -I come to Ann Arbor. I
have played here a 'good many times
,nd I love it all-even the street cars,"
she added smiling. "The town has
character-distinct from all others."
Harry Neville who was Timpson of
"The Pigeon," and Earl of Loam in
"The Admirable Crichton," besides
playing comedy roles in the Shake-
spearean plays, is an Australian act-
or who has toured all parts of the
world.
In commenting on his visit here he
said that one of the notable things was
co-education. "In my part of the
world, it is not customary at all and
I have been immensely surprised since
my residence in this country 'at how
well it is coming off in the States ;
I think that the reason for it all is
that the American university woman is
a sportsman at heart."
Here Mr. Neville put a cigarette in
his tortoise shell holder and contin-
ued: "She doesn't force a man to pro-
pose to her in self defense."
Another thing that Mr. Neville men-
tioned was the tact that so many stu-
dents earn their way through school.
"To do this back in England would
mean that you must lose your social
position, for the time being at least.
I consider that we have much to learn
in this respect from America."
Frank McEntee who plays leading
roles in tihe Shakespeare Playhouse
company, his own company, expects
to return to Ann Arbor early in the
fall. When he was here Mr. McEntee
looked over the stage facilities of Hill
auditorium, in which the productions
of this company, which will be brought
here later this year, may be given.

gium and sacredness of treaties, but
later the working people demanded
something more substantial, asking
what they were to receive in returnF
for their sacrifices. In response to
these requests many of the labor lead-
ers were given position of great re-
sponsibility in the government.
While the war was in progress, Eng-
lish industry according to Professor
Allin, was nationalized and socialized.C
"England became in the last two yearst
of the war," added the speaker, "an
great socialized state."t
Another wartime dejelopment wasv
the change in the prin ple of wealths
distribution not according to the re-
lative economic strength of the indi-
vidual or the value of the man's serv-
ices, but according to his needs.,
Frown on NormalcyI
When the war nad been terminatedd
the working class swore against a re-d
turn to normalcy and pre-war condi-
tions, declared Professor Allin. Anj
example of this was the miners' strikes
which was precipitated by the inten-
tion of the government to return the
mines to their former owners. Thist
meant a lowering of wages to thet
former stadard of living or below andI
was met by a challenge of the work-I
men advocating the'nationalization oft
the mines. The strike failed becauset
many of the people were not in sym-
pathy with the movement, but a corn-
promise was effected which gave the
miners a minimum wage and a di-
vision of the excess profits between the
capitalists and the laborers.
Professor Allin stated that the
French idea of syndicalism has not
been accepted in full in England but
that it has been modified to the formF
of a guild socialism, rather than or-
thodox socialism with the latter's in-1
terference in the natural rights oft
groups. The speaker believes thatt
the individual has nearly disappearedf
in England and has been replaced by1
the system of recognition of the na-
tural rights of the group.-
Parliamentary omnipotence has beent
lost, so that labor congresses and con-t
ventions of the chambers of com-
merce now assume more importancet
than the meetings of parliament.-
Britain a League of States t
The change in the idea of the con-!
trol of foreign policy by England alone
came about during the negotiation of
the peace treaty at Paris when the
English colonies and dominions were
represented. The results is, said Pro-
fessor Allin, that "The British nation
today is an association or league of
states and not a great empire. An-
other tendency to be noted, declared
the speaker, is the great loss of the
bourgeoise class, the dying of the'lib-
eral party, and the alignment of Eng-
lish politics into the opposing camps
of the capital and labor.
SHOWERS HINDER
NET TOURNAMENT
Rain yesterday put a stop to the
progress of the Summer session ten-
nis tournament now being held at Fer-
ry field. Matches will be resumed to-
day, weather permitting.
Dr. George A. May, director of Wat-
erman gymnasium, who is supervising
the tournament, urges all entrants to
play off their matches as soon as pos-
sible, so that the tournament may be
closed without delay the latter part of
the week.
The first and second places in the
singles and the doubles matches will
reeive prizes in the form of tennis
paraphenalia, which will be purchased
with proceeds from entrance fees.

WESBROOK WILL PAIR
WITH HENNESSEY FOR
WESTERN TITLE PLAYr
FORMER VARSITY STAR LOSES1
SINGLES CHAMPIONSHIP f
TO PARTNER1
(By Associated Press)a
Chicago, Aug. 7.-In two of the most
closely fought matches over seen in
the finals of a Western tennis tourna-
ment, John Hennessey of Indianapolis,
three times Indiana state champion,
won the Western singles champion-
ship yesterday, and, paired with Walt-
r Wesbrook, of Detroit, former captain7
of Michigan's Varsity tennis team, his
opponent in the singles, defeated
Ralph Burdick and Fritz Bastian of
Indianapolis, National clay court
doubles champions, for the Western
doubles title.
In the singles Hennessey defeated
Wesbrook 6-3, 5-7, 6-1, 11-9. The
singles finalists won the doubles 5-7
10-8, 6-1, 6-3.
As the result of their doubles vie-
tory, Wesbrook and Hennessey will
be sent to the National doubles chan
pionship at Longwood Cricket club at
Boston late this month as representa-
tives of the Western Tennis associa-
tion.
Class To Offer
"fruilting Pot
Thursday Night
Preliminary to the public perform-
ance of "The Melting Pot," to be of-
fered Thursday evening in University
hall by the class in Play Production,I
the cast, which has been working on
the play for the past four weeks, last
evening held its final dress rehearsal.
Prof. R. D. T. Hollister, who is direct-
ing the production, expressed his con-1
fidence that the cast has now reached
the point where only a few minor de-
tails remain to be altered.
As a play, "The Melting Pot," writ-
ten by Israel Zangwill, is an intensely
interesting study. It deals with the
timely subject of the foreign immi--
grant in his new and strange environ-
ment, and offers a very gripping char-
acterization throughout.
Costumes for "The Rivals," the play
to be presented Friday evening, have
arrived from Chicago, and prepara-
tions are being made for the dress re-
hearsals and other final arrangements.
"The Rivals" is a very different type
of play, abounding as it does in amus-
ing situations and extremely humor-
ous characters. Its mirth is always
contagious, making of the play a thor-
oughly delightful comedy.
Tickets for both performances are
on sale at Wahr's bookstore. Reserv-
ed seats are being sold for 75 cents.
and general admission, 50 cents.
BETSY BARBOUR WOMEN EN-
TERTAIN FACULTY MEMBERS
Girls of Betsy Bar our house en-
tertained members of the faculty and
their wives at an informal tea Sunday
afternoon. Tal baskets of pink and
white gladiols were used to decorate
the sun parlor, living and dining
rooms where ice cream, cake and cof-
fee were served.
Eleanor Sheldon, social director,
Lilah G. Hainer, business manager,
Sadie Cnossen, presidnt, and Alice
Smith, vice-president, acted as a re-
ception committee.,

I Northcliffe Reported Worse

CURTISS DELIVERS
LECTURE ON STARS
Stressing the relative diminutive-
ness of our own sun in comparison
with the seemingly unlimited magni-
tude of the universe, Prof. R. H. Cur-
tss of the astronomy department, de-
ivered a lecture on "Our Sun and
Others," in Natural Science auditor-
ium last night. He illustrated his talk
with slides of the sun, moon, stars,
and nebulae.
, ITU. MEN TO WEAR
--- I
NEW STYLE UNIFORMS1
TWO MORE OFFICERS ASSIGNED
TO UNIT; MORE THAN 500
MEN EXPECTED
Tentative plans for the next acad-
emic year of the department of mil-
itary science and tactics were given
out yesterday by Major Robert Arthur,
officer in charge.
It is estimated that enrollment in1
the R. 0. T. C. will number betweent
500 and 550 students. With the pro-1
motion of men from the summer
camps, the enrollment in the advanc-t
ed courses will total 130. Approxi-
mately 400 men are expected to en-t
roll in the basic courses, 129 men1
having already registered.
No addition has been made to the
curriculum. One course for seniors,'
course 27, minor tactics, will be given
for the first time. Courses 6 and 7
will be interchanged, course 6 to bet
taken in the first semester of the sen-
ior year instead of the second semest-
er of the junior year.t
All men in the advanced courses1
in the R. 0. T. C. will be provided with
new uniforms, for which the contract
has just been let. The uniforms will
be forestry green, similar in color
to those of the United States marine
corps, and will consist of trousers,
blouse cut like the English officer's
coat, and a United States militaryI
cap.
Each uniform will bear all war
service and wound chevrons, service
stripes, and decorations to which the]
wearer may be entitled. There will
be no marks to distinguish between
different branches of the corps.
Two kiew members, Capt. I-. P.
Faust and Capt. W. C Louisel, have
been added to thd staff. Captain'
Faust is a graduate of the United
States military academy at West Point.
and was on duty at Ft. Ilancock, N.'
J., until this summer when he was
engaged as R. O. T. C. summer camp
instructor in coast artillery. He will
instruct freshman classes in the fall.
Captain Lousell, who is a graduae
of the Alabama Polytechnic institute.
comes directly from the United States
infantry school at Camp Benning, Va.
He was one of Walter (amp's first All-
American football team selections from
the South. Captain Louisell was in-
fantry instructor at Camp Custer this
summer, and is now on duty at the
Civilians Military Training camp. Be
will instruct'sophomore and junior in-
fantry classes.
STUDENTS TO VISIT PLANT
OF PARKE, DAVIS & COMPANY
On the thirteenth excursion of the
Summer session tomorrow students
will be extended the opportunity to
visit the pharmaceutical laboratories
of Parke, Davis and company, De-
troit. Extensive arrangements have

been made by the company to ac-
commodate the party, including spe-
cial guides to conduct the visitors.
These manufacturers have a nation-
al reputation. and distribute their
products throughout the world. Al-
though the trip will be of special ap-
peal to students in pharmacy, it is ex-
pected to be of general interest.

PRESIDENT ASKS
MEN TO RETURN
TO RAIL SHOPS
SENDS STRIKERS PROPOSALS TO
RESUME OPERATIONS ON
ROADS
EXECUTIVES ASKED TO
TAKE EMPLOYES BACK
Union Spokesmen Indicate They Will
Not Accept New Offering
for Settlement
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Aug. 7. - As "a final
call" from the government for an
immediate settlement of the rail
strike, President Harding today com-
municated to railroad executives and
heads of the striking shop craft
union proposals that the men be sent
back to work, that the managements
take them back, and that adjustment
of the crucial seniority issue be left
to decisions of the railroad labor
board.
Though the President was said to
cjonsider this the only practical
course the government could take,
union spokesmen indicating its re-
jection, summoned their associates to
meet here Wednesday to pass upon
the proposal.
The rail executives had made no
response to the White House tonight,
though press dispatches indicated that
they also would meet to frame a col-
lective answer.
HAINES TO PUBLISH
N E W NOVEL SOON
"Skyline Inn" is the name of a new
novel by Donal Hamilton Haines,, of
the department of rhetoric and, journ-
alism, which will be published next
spring by Houghton, Mifflin, and com-
pany.
"This is not a problem novel," says
Mr. Haines. "It is merely a modern,
uptodate yarn." Its setting in the
foothills of the Sierras in California,
the story deals with adventures which
occur to tourists residing at "Skyline
Inn." Readers of the Outlook during
1918-1920 will remember Theophile
Gelas, the inkeeper, a character whom
laines created then, and who was the
central figure in two series of short
stories.
Mr. Haines has been engaged in free
lance magazine writing since his grad-
uation from the University in 1909. He
is the author of one other novel, "The
Return of Pierre," which was publish-
ed in 1912, and several books for boys
which appeared serially in the Amer-
ican Boy. Mr. 1liaines will teach a
course in magazine writing, an addi-
tion to the University's journalism
curriculum, this fall.
HELEN NEWBERRY RESIDENCE
ALMOST READY FOR OPENING
Work on Helen Newberry residence
is nearing completion. This women's
dormitory has been closed during the
Summer session in order that the
fourth floor of the building might be
enlarged and more window space add-
ed by extending the dormers.
Many of the rooms on the fourth
floor have been made larger and will
be used as double rooms. Bookcases

have been built in several pf them and
window seats have been extended un-
der the front windows.
The installation of the new ice plant
which is to be put in the building is
well under way. The building will be
ready for occupancy with the opening
of school in the fall.

London, Aug. 7. - A bulletin is-
Denby Leaves for United States sued by the physicians attending Vis-
Manila, Aug. 7.- Secretary Denby count Northcliffe this morning said
and his party left here on the U. S. S. there had been a rapid increase in the
Henderson at daylight today for the patient's weakness, and that his con-
United States via Gaum and Honolulu. dition was considered very grave.

I

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"The Melting Pot" TMRS A
"The Rivals" FRIDAY*o
VSA1It AT EIGHT P. M., UNIVERSITY HALL
TICKETS AT WAHR'S RESERVED 75c, GENERAL 50c
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