100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 05, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-08-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE SUMMER MICHYdEAN DAILY

SATURDAY, AUGU

04r olamultr

tx t ttzc

:43ttt1 V

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER SESSION OF
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Moiday during the Summer
Session by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for re-
publication of all news dispatches credited to it or otkerwIsl
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
0ntered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
cas matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $i. 5.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signa-
ture not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of faith,
and notices of events will be published in The Summer Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Summer Daily
office. Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No
manuscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Summer Daily does not necessarily endorse the senti-
ments expressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR ................LEO J. HERSHDORFER
City Editor......-...........................James B. Young
Night Editors-
Howard A. Donahue Julian E. Mack
W. B. Butler
Women's Editor........ .....................Dorothy Bennetts
Editorial Board....................erbert S. Case, Ellen Nylund
Humor Editor..................................Donald Coney
Literary Editor................. ..............G. D. Eaton
Assistants

Portia Goulder
Janet Menges

C, R. Trotter
Thelma Andrews

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER ...................HEROLD C. HUNT
Advertising.................... ...........Townsend H. Wolfe
Publication..............................George W. Rockwood
Accounts....................................Laurence H. Favrot
circulation...................-.-..............Edward F. Conlin
Assistants

Philip H. Goldsmith

Katherine E. Styer

Alma E. Young
SATURDAY, AUGUST 5, 1922
Night Editor-HOWARD A. DONAHUE
Assistant-Robert Ramsay
FIGHTING THE SOCIALISTS
Believing that the wild-eyed, loud mouthed Social-
ist has duped the people of Michigan long enough
without any opposition, a new type of soap box
orator has made its headquarters in Detroit.
The Constitutional Defense League has begun
to start operations in this state. Its speakers talk
from the soap box on the curb and distribute their
literature among the pedestrians, using practically
the same methods as do the radical Socialists. They
preach doctrine of Americanism against Socialism of
social reform versus revolution, and they preach it
with vigor, challenging any Socialist to a public
debate at any time of night or day. They are skill-
ed orators who have made an extensive study of
the radical's philosophy and type of argument and
are capable of meeting its expounders in debate.
The League has been organized three years
and it has been doing some commendable work.
Such an organization most certainly has a service
to perform. Soap box oratory, though not very
convincing in name, wields a great influence over
the minds of many, and much dirty work has been
successfully carried out by the radical Socialists
through just such methods of getting at the public.
The Socialists in America have carried on extensive
and powerful propaganda, and their glib-tongued
expounders have not been unheard. But until the
Constitutional Defense League was organized, they
had none to refute their strong-lunged statements to
the people whose minds are swayed by what they
hear from the sop box pulpit. Now the soap box
audience has an opportunity to hear the other side
of a yellow propaganda that makes its appeal to
the working class.
Though the League's speakers are exceedingly
interesting and have a wealth of sound arguments
and good material in back of them, their business
need not carry them to Ann Arbor because the So-
cialists of this city are happily confined exclusively
to the parlor type.
SUMMER SPORTS
Gone are Joes' and the Orient, but in their place
as rendezvous for refreshment craving students has
arrived the pop corn stand. Pop corn unlike most
other things has had a revival out of all proportion
with any discoveries in its qualities. During the
period immediately following the passing of the
eighteenth amendment, students have sought, quite
unsatisfactorily it would seem, for a substitute for
their rolicking times at these places, and as a con-
sequence soda fountains and lunch counters have
sprung up in .vast numbers. The most satisfactory
solution yet discoveerd seems to be the pop corn
stand.
Like all modern industries that would keep and
increase their business vast improvements have been
made, until today the pop corn vender is as much
a business man as any other person who caters to
student trade. After the first lap of studying, or
perhaps getting ready to study, the fragrant scents
of freshly roasted corn which float up and down
State street tempt scores of students and residents
to desert their toils, in order to make purchases.
When one views the greatness of the throng
which stands patiently in line to get the corn, one
cannot help but wonder what the cause of this in-
creased consumption may be. It is possible that

there has been a resurrection of thrift in students,
but that is little credited. However, it is to be re-
gretted that the popularity of pop corn like other
summer delicacies will doubtlessly wane with the
departure of summer.
TAKING PART
(Ann Arbor Times News)
Carlton F. Wells, Ann Arbor's new state golf
champion, made several statements in his talk at
the Chamber of Commerce luncheon Tuesday noon
which are deserving of wider circulation.
Chief among them, perhaps, was the contrast be-
tween golf and football, which he brought out forci-
bly during his remarks. At a football game, said
Mr. Wells, not one person in ten in the stands plays
the game. In golf, although the galleries are far
smaller, practically every person in the gallery plays
the game.
This is a new way of pointing out one of the
big reasons for the rapid spread of interest in golf.
Everyone who is not actually crippled can play the
game. Young children are learning to play on three
of the courses near Ann Arbor, while on the same
links enthusiasts well past middle age may also be
found.
The great stimulus in golf is in bettering your
own game, rather thon in beating some one else,
and in this difference from many other athletic con-
tests, also, probably lies some of the fascination of
the links.
That interest in the ancient Scotch game is grow-
ing in Ann Arbor is apparent from the steadily in-
creasing memberships of the local clubs. The bring-
ing of the state championship to this city will add
to the keenness with which local enthusiasts will
take up golf.
There is no danger that golf will usurp the place
of baseball in American sports, for the national
pastime has as firm a hold as ever on the interest of
a million fans. But golf interest is growing and
will continue to grow through the even closer hold
which it exerts on the thousands of men and women
who actually play the game.
Pig league baseball will continue to reign su-
preme as a national spectacle, but golf is the com-
ing national pastime.
THE FRYING PAN
"-a flash in the Pan."
The teacher are a queerly crowd.
In winter nice and cool
It teach the moron loud
To mind the gilt-edge rool
But when the simmer come about
We education do without -
THEN the teacher go to school!
Gallows-Meat
The onion who says our imported cigarettes may
be all right in their place but their place hasn't been
dug yet.
"As dishonorable," says the answer to the eti-
quette problem in the Chi Trib yesterday, "as dis-
honorable as one who would deliberately open a let-
ter addressed.to another is a person who reads a
communication left unfinished."
Very dishonorable, and besides, the technique is
bad; you should wait until the letter is finished so
you can get all the dope.
"Smoking Taken Seriously by British Women."
So is smoking taken seriously by American wom-
en, especially members of the W. C. T. U., and the
old ladies of both sexes in the Prohibition party.
He'd been in Paris two weeks once;
His nerve was monumental;
And in that time he had acquired
A manner continental.
So when he left her at the door
His conduct was too shameless;

He deftly kissed her on each cheek-
The girl remarked, "How aimless."
VACATION BLURBS
A little breeze blowin' in off the lake; the farther
shore still blue with early haze. The sun just break-
in' up over the edge of trees and splashin' bold all
over the little waves. The rhythmic creak "of row-
locks from the cove: and the bang of the screen door
as you come out on the porch to splash the sleep out
of your eyes with cold water and gulp in the chill
morning air and the smell of cookin' coffee
That's vacation!
An' me here in Ann Arbor.
Well, fourteen more days.
In some towns the crime wave seems to be a
permanent wave.
"Students Imitate U. of M.: Jailed." When in
Rome, you know, one should obey the Roman speed
laws.
"What," said the guy who puts his collar on over
his head, "they have 'The Taming of the Shrew' on
the campus ? Gee, is that old chestnut runnin' yet ?"
The Hogan Prize of two hundred magnums of
rag-weed serum will be awarded the person who
discovered his reserved seat at the Campus Open Air
theater on the opening night.
CALIGULA.

YdU WILL FIND THE
Farmers
and.Mechanics-Bank
A pleasant, conven-
ient and SAFE place
to transact your
business.
TWO OFFICES:
101-105 South Main St.
330 South State St.
Nickels' Arcade
Member of the Federal Reserve

I -

-.

--.

-i

All Summer Hats
at August Reductions
1 lot $7.50 1 lot $5.00
1 lot $2.50 1 lot $3 00
1 lot $1.50
Puyear and Hintz
328 South Main Street

I-

Yf

v. --
__. _ .

i

i

1

-

rDO YOU WATA UT
At a Saving Of
r -
Buy the cloth by the yard at cost! Have your suit
made up in our own shop at cost. It means a
double saving to you-on the material and on
the tailoring.
J. KA RL M ALCOLM'S
_ 604 E. Liberty St. 604 E. Liberty St.+
- -
111111111111111ill 11111111111 llllnltlli11 111II HMIIIII III I II IIII I IIII1111111111 11111111I M111111111111111111111 till%
-- - - - -~ - -

I For Your Summer Reading

.....
.._.. .

from
GRAHAM'S
Both +ores

MONO

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan